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Hi,

Winston has always been a fussy eater and recently has been sick a few times. We have been back and forward to the vets and today, after blood tests and x-rays and various other investigations he has been diagnosed with pancreatitis. The Vet has explained that we should put him on a low fat diet from now on. We now have to stop his Skinners food and only feed him Chappie.

Has anybody else had a dog with this condition? And as he is only 8 months old and still a puppy, will feeding him adult food chappie affect him in anyway? Is there a better food we can feed him or should I add some supplements? If so - which ones? Any advice greatly received.
 

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Poor chap :( ...sorry to hear that..no experience at all...but someone will be along soon ...I hope you get him onto a diet that suits him..keep us posted :)
 

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I have had a look on the web as I have had dealings with this with humans but not dogs. I feel it is just a need to keep the fat content down and I would have thought that there may be better alternatives to Chappie :?

I have copied the information that I have found for you.

Hope it settles soon..

Hayley x

What is Pancreatitis:
The pancreas is a V-shaped organ located behind the stomach and the first section of the small intestine, the duodenum. It has two main functions: it aids in metabolism of sugar in the body through the production of insulin, and is necessary for the digestion of food materials by producing pancreatic enzymes. These enzymes help the body promote the digestion and absorption of fats. Acute pancreatitis is a sudden onset of pancreatic inflammation
Causes of Pancreatitis:
Multiple factors can contribute to the development of pancreatitis. Certain medications, infections; metabolic disorders including hyperlipidemia (high amounts of lipid in the blood) and hypercalcemia (high amounts of calcium in the blood); and trauma and shock can be associated with the development of pancreatitis. Middle-aged dogs appear to be at increased risk of developing pancreatitis; as a breed, Schnauzers and Yorkshire Terriers appear to be more prone to pancreatitis. Nutrition also plays a role. Dogs with diets high in fat, or dogs who 'steal' or are fed greasy 'people food' seem to have a high incidence of the disease.
Symptoms:
Common symptoms of the acute form of pancreatitis in dogs include a very painful abdomen, abdominal distention, lack of appetite, depression, dehydration, a 'hunched up' posture, vomiting, diarrhea and yellow, greasy stool. Fever often accompanies these symptoms. Animals with more severe disease can develop heart beats sepsis (body-wide infection), difficulty breathing, and a life-threatening condition called disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), which results in multiple points of bleeding in the body If the inflammation is severe, organs surrounding the pancreas could be 'autodigested' by pancreatic enzymes released from the damaged pancreas and become permanently damaged.
Diagnosis of Pancreatitis:
The diagnosis of pancreatitis is made through information obtained from the history, the physical exam, and laboratory testing. Dogs with pancreatitis generally have an increased blood levels of the pancreatic enzymes called amylase and lipase. If the liver also becomes inflamed, liver enzymes as measured in the blood may be increased. A rather new test, serum trypsin-like immunoreactivity, may prove to be a valuable diagnostic aid. The white blood cell count is generally increased in acute pancreatitis. Radiography (x-rays) and ultrasound can also help in making the diagnosis. Biopsy can result in a conclusive diagnosis, but is not commonly performed.
Treatment of Pancreatitis:
The goal of treatment is to rest the pancreas, provide supportive care and control complications. Treatment always begins with a withholding of food, water, and oral medications for at least 24 hours. The lack of oral intake stops the stimulation of the pancreas to produce digestive enzymes. Depending upon the animal's response, food intake can be started again after a few days. The dog is generally fed small meals of a bland, easily digestible, low-fat food. Over the course of a week or more, the size of meals and quantity of food fed are increased. The dog may need to stay on the special diet for life, or it may be possible to gradually reintroduce the former diet.

The second major component of treatment is fluid therapy. Dehydration and electrolyte imbalances are common in dogs with acute pancreatitis, and water intake is often restricted so fluid therapy is usually needed. Fluids are either given subcutaneously or intravenous.

Dogs who are experiencing severe pain can be treated with pain relievers such as meperidine or butorphanol. Antibiotics are often administered prophylactically to protect against infection.

If the pancreatitis was caused by a medication, the medication should be stopped. If it was caused by a toxin, infection, or other condition, appropriate therapy for the underlying condition should be started.

In rare instances, where there are intestinal complications or the development of a pancreatic abscess, surgery may be necessary.
 

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Monty was diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis a few months back (diagnosed by our holistic vet) . He is currently on a home-cooked diet of chicken breast, potato, and vegetables, along with homeopathic remedies. He's also on Garcinia and Aloe Vera, and low-fat live yoghurt.

Like Winston, Monty was always a fussy eater and often vomited (from being a puppy).
He is still having "flare-ups" - usually he has a noisy tum for a couple of hours, then refuses his dinner. Later in the day he begins to eat again. The low fat diet is essential.

June and Monty
 

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oh poor winston , that is a very painful thing :( . We have, thankfully not had a dog with this so am not able to give any personal experiences of it but do hope he gets better soon .

There is one thing that I can say is that friends of ours had a German Shepherd which had an over growth of bacteria in it's gut and had real problems ( this was only about 6mnth at the time ) and they too had to use a low fat diet ( chappie by the large tin full !!) for quite some time and although he was not a really good weight ( a bit on the light side but not drastic :wink: ) he did not suffer any long term effects and had a good hip score and went on to live a full and active life .
 

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Sorry no advice, Cori has the problem of not being able to digest food properly and we are struggling to get weight on her

No advice, but just to let you know thinking of you and best of luck for your boy :?
 

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Can't help with any advice but hope that Winston feels better soon and you can manage the problem through diet.
 

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No advice I`m afraid but wanted to say I`m sorry to hear about Winston, I would though think he needs solid food as well as the chappie, what I mean is biscuit type meal, if he has to stay on wet food for the rest of his life you`ll need to keep an eye on his teeth too.
 
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