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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

I visit here most days and love how good the community is and the pictures are fantastic, one thing everyone says is how quick they grow up

Murphy is now 14 weeks old and can do the basics sit, shake his paw, stay when in our garden not tried it out with distractions.

We start puppy classes in 10 days time which I hope goes better than at the vets last week when he thought he would put his big paw on a 12 week old Beagles head but they did play

What training would you suggest to start with or wait now till the puppy classes?
 

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I concentrate on three main things, recall, sit/stop, recall, manners on lead, and recall. Guess which one most people complain about going out of the window first.

As well as those three, I try and get my pup used to being handled, having claws clipped, putting things in their mouth (syringe or tablets, you can substitute yoghurt or milk in a syringe, and just a piece of kibble to pretend it's a tablet), and also having their eyes and ears cleaned.
 

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Probably heelwork is the most important, to the extent I normally start the day my new puppy arrives.

I usually start off lead. Remember, it's normal to walk a dog on your left, (probably due to the fact that most people are right handed so it left the right hand free) But whichever side you choose, the important thing is that you stick to it. A dog continually changing sides will eventually trip you up!!

Arm yourself with a nice smelly treat, call your puppy to you and take a few paces forward giving the command "Heel" and telling pup what a good boy he is! Make sure he knows you have the treat, it acts like an invisible lead and can be used to guide him to where you want him. After just a few paces, break off, play with him and give hip the treat. 4 or 5 paces is plenty initially so it's easy indoors or out in the garden. Do this two or three times a day, gradually extending the distance, but only by a pace or so.

Straight lines are boring so as distance increases start adding turns in. (This is where I start using a lead.) Try to keep the lead loose all the time controlling the position with the treat and footwork. If your pup is getting in front turn across in front of him. Don't stand on him, but what you are trying to let him know is, "You don't know where I'm going so stay back!" If he is a little behind then turn away from him which puts him even further behind, putting the onus on him to catch up. I also walk in circles, the direction depending on whether I want my pup to drop back a bit, or move forward slightly. Squares or triangles are also good for keeping attention on you. But whatever you do, make it fun and make it interesting. Training should be a great game you play together.
 

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Thank you both, we will start that today he certainly is a very intelligent lad like all labs.... any preference on the treats? we was using his food but then got some Coachies?
 

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Thank you both, we will start that today he certainly is a very intelligent lad like all labs.... any preference on the treats? we was using his food but then got some Coachies?
I just use anything small enough that isn't brightly coloured, it doesn't have to be 100% natural for my lot as they are only getting a few. At the minute I've got some mini bonio type treats and milk bones.
 
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