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Vogue is learning flyball at the moment, every Monday we go to the racecourse to the arena we use for flyball. They usually train the dogs by their owner standing at the end and encouraging the dog to get the ball then running back over the jumps with them, that method doesnt quite work with a wheelchair and so I sat midway thru the course encouraging Vogue, she ran to the end, got the ball ran round the outside of the jumps (which have a fence either side for dog who are learning) over the fence and sat in front of me!


The other very funny thing was one of the other dogs, chipper struggled out of his harness much do his owners dismay, however instead of running riot he ran a perfect flyball course and came back proud as punch!

Anna
 

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Hi Anna,

Sounds like you & Vogue had a great time at the arena - flyball sounds like fun!

I haven't heard of it before, so looked up some info on it on the net, i've added it here just for those who don't know what it is. :wink:

I'd love to see the dogs in action, maybe in the future we can get Bradley into some form of agility training. Not knowing much about it, i've always wondered how their joints would take it - have you any info/tips for me?

I'm sure like Vogue, Bradley would soon be cheating his way around! :lol:

Here's a little info on flyball as taken from www.petplanet.co.uk

Flyball Racing

by Margaret McCabe



Imagine a sport which is a combination of hurdling, sprinting, baseball and the ever popular relay race. Sound impossible? Well, an ever increasing number of dog owners around the UK are discovering that not only is it possible, it's great fun too.

It's called Flyball, and it's accessible to just about anyone who has a dog.

For those of you who have never seen flyball, here is a brief description:

The dog jumps over a row of four hurdles, at the end of which is the flyball box.
The dog bounces on the box, causing a tennis ball to be launched into the air.
The dog now has to catch the ball and return to the start line, jumping the hurdles on the way back.

Sound exciting? Add three other dogs, all barely containing their excitement as they wait their turn to play this cool game, along with a crowd of wildly enthusiastic, cheering spectators and you begin to get a taste for the pleasures which await you.

Flyball originated on the West Coast of America over quarter of a century ago. A man called Herbert Wagner went into his garage armed with his dog's obsession with tennis balls, and emerged with a mechanical throwing contraption which the dog could operate itself. Of course, you can't keep that sort of thing to yourself and soon dog enthusiasts were exploring its possibilities as a new sport.

The word 'flyball' reflects the fact that initially, it was the throw and catch that was important - boxes were designed to throw the ball up to 10 feet in the air. However, the sport developed into a contest of speed, with racing boxes now combining the throwing mechanism with a turning surface for the dogs to maximise their speed.

Dog clubs around Britain are beginning to offer flyball classes. They range from the serious competition classes, which really favour the faster, more agile breeds, to classes which encourage fun and games in a non-competitive environment. Some even use alternatives to the flyball box, throwing a selection of soft toys, for those dogs who can't get excited about tennis balls!

Flyball is open to everyone. Unlike agility, the dog does all of the work, so you don't have to be an Olympic athlete to take part. The hurdles are low, so your dog doesn't have to be an Olympic athlete either. Also, the hurdles are normally solid, so you don't have problems with dogs running underneath the poles. It helps if your dog starts with a passion for retrieving, although it is possible to teach dogs this skill.

If you would like more information on this exciting activity, get in touch with the British Flyball Association. They can be contacted at:

The British Flyball Assocation
PO Box 109
Petersfield, Hants
GU32 1XZ
Telephone: 01730 828269
Website: www.flyball.org.uk
 

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Vogue is certainly good at bringing things back to you :lol: Sounds like flyball is fun, I've only watched it on Crufts, but maybe one day will see dogs doing it at a show for myself.
 

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anna said:
Vogue is learning flyball at the moment, every Monday we go to the racecourse to the arena we use for flyball. They usually train the dogs by their owner standing at the end and encouraging the dog to get the ball then running back over the jumps with them, that method doesnt quite work with a wheelchair and so I sat midway thru the course encouraging Vogue, she ran to the end, got the ball ran round the outside of the jumps (which have a fence either side for dog who are learning) over the fence and sat in front of me!
Anna
Anna
From you recent post on Chat about the 40m straw bales hurdles , it sounds like you don't need any ways of cheating at flyball!!! :lol: :wink:
 
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