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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I really hope I can get some help here.
I have two Labs both bitches.
One is 10 months and the other is 20 months, neither spayed but will be early next year.
The problem I have is walking them together they pull on the lead hard especially the 10 month old. When I walk them separate they are fantastic and no pulling whatever.
I've tried halties, harness etc which work to a degree but haven't removed the issue when together. They know how to walk correctly as they demonstrate that when walked singly.

Any advice or tips greatly appreciated.
 

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Two young Labradors with the usual problem walking together. COMPETITION! What happens is, one tries to lead the way then the other tries to get in front of the first and so on, with the poor owner getting dragged along behind.

There's an old saying, "If I wanted to go to there I'd not start from here!" I like around 3 years between my dogs. so I really have the training for the first nailed before the second arrives. Not only that but the first is truly adult before the second arrives, and really helps to train the pup. (See my video below of Amy joining in with Chloe, setting an example.) But we have to work with what we have rather than what would be the ideal, and that is a puppy and a very young adult.

You can get what are called "Link leads," where a single lead branches out like a Y with one dog on each of the legs. But personally I could never get on with them, particularly during training. I preferred two separate leads so I could control either dog independently. And the type of lead, a gundog slip lead. I like a fairly long lead, around 4 foot, which is long enough to convert into a figure eight lead if you need it. I always walked them both on the left with the young dog on the inside and the older on the outside and the leads held in my left hand.

In all training you go through a number of stages. First without distractions, then gradually upping the distractions. You say they walk OK on their own, so thats the "without distraction" sorted, do now you have added a distraction so it's back to training. Remember it IS training, you are not going any place, purely training, concentrating on the dogs. Walking in squares, circles and triangles, turning left and right. Dont walk far enough in a straight line for them to decide they know where they are going. That way you keep the concentration on you. Turning into them when they start to get in front tends to push them back, turning away from them when they get behind helps to encourage them forward. Remember, you set the order they walk in. As I said, I prefer the oldest on the outside, but thats just me, but if you done enforce a rule on this you will find they keep swapping over and the leads get tangled. Humans have to make the ground rules and dogs have to obey them. Really it's all about training, and the more you train the easier it gets.

Chloe heel 1 - YouTube
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Two young Labradors with the usual problem walking together. COMPETITION! What happens is, one tries to lead the way then the other tries to get in front of the first and so on, with the poor owner getting dragged along behind.

There's an old saying, "If I wanted to go to there I'd not start from here!" I like around 3 years between my dogs. so I really have the training for the first nailed before the second arrives. Not only that but the first is truly adult before the second arrives, and really helps to train the pup. (See my video below of Amy joining in with Chloe, setting an example.) But we have to work with what we have rather than what would be the ideal, and that is a puppy and a very young adult.

You can get what are called "Link leads," where a single lead branches out like a Y with one dog on each of the legs. But personally I could never get on with them, particularly during training. I preferred two separate leads so I could control either dog independently. And the type of lead, a gundog slip lead. I like a fairly long lead, around 4 foot, which is long enough to convert into a figure eight lead if you need it. I always walked them both on the left with the young dog on the inside and the older on the outside and the leads held in my left hand.

In all training you go through a number of stages. First without distractions, then gradually upping the distractions. You say they walk OK on their own, so thats the "without distraction" sorted, do now you have added a distraction so it's back to training. Remember it IS training, you are not going any place, purely training, concentrating on the dogs. Walking in squares, circles and triangles, turning left and right. Dont walk far enough in a straight line for them to decide they know where they are going. That way you keep the concentration on you. Turning into them when they start to get in front tends to push them back, turning away from them when they get behind helps to encourage them forward. Remember, you set the order they walk in. As I said, I prefer the oldest on the outside, but thats just me, but if you done enforce a rule on this you will find they keep swapping over and the leads get tangled. Humans have to make the ground rules and dogs have to obey them. Really it's all about training, and the more you train the easier it gets.

Chloe heel 1 - YouTube
Thank you so much for the reply.
I'll start this training straight away and let you know about the progression we hopefully make over the coming days/weeks.
 
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