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We are about to embark on a vigarous training program of leash training for Bradley.

Has any one got any hints and tips they could share on best methods of this ?

Bradley tends to really pull hard on the leash sometimes, we have been told to pull back hard on the leash to tug him back next to you accompanied with a firm NO ??


We have also purchased a halti collar, has anyone used one of these before ?
 

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have a longer lead than nessasary and use the extra bit as a windmill infront to stop the dog going forward.
it does work :wink:
 

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We are in the same boat with Kane, wanting to make the right start.

Alfie who sadly died was very strong willed & we had purchased a halti lead but regretably never had the chance to try it on him. The halti lead was recommended by a mate who swore by it.

Let me know how you get on, I will do the same.... 8)
 

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The halti lead was recommended by a mate who swore by it.

Let me know how you get on, I will do the same....

Well, so far so good..

We put the halti on Bradley to allow him to get used to it first, and we are popping it on him for 15 mins at a time inside before going out on his walk, several times a day. He's not keen on it, and tries to have a boxing match with himself trying to get it of! We are going to be doing a lot of training with him this week, and have also bought a clicker, so it will be halti & clicker time! I shall promise myself i can have a large martini by the end of the day, as i think i'm gonna need it! lol. I'll let you know how the walks go, we're taking him out on the halti today.

Anyone else have any more tips on using a halti?

Much appreciated... :wink:
 

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I don't know if you can purchase one of these, but have you thought about a prong/pinch collar? It is a very effective TRAINING tool. I know some places do not allow them to be sold. I have used them on both my labs when I started training. I don't use it any more on my YF. My BM still has one on occasionally because he gets really excited about meeting new people. If I take him some place where there is a large crowd I will use it. Normally he is on a flat buckle collar. While a prong collar looks a bit medieval, they are quite humane when used properly. :)
 
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lead training

Hi
The best type of lead to use for heel work is your common or garden slip lead, this is all that is needed to start him off use no collar just the slip lead, basicly it is a rope with a ring fitted to one end that the main part of the lead passes through and another larger loop spliced at the top for a handle it is very important that you fit the lead correctly other wise it will not release when you slack off, the lead is fitted to the dog with the metal ring passing under the dogs throat and pointing to the left knee with the main body of the lead going down the left side of the dogs neck under neath his throat.
The lead is carried in the right hand across the front of your body with a slack part of the lead hanging,the pup should be by your left side with his head level with your left knee, when he try's to pull forward snap the lead back with your left hand so that he receives a sharp shock, at the same time strike your thigh and tell him heel.
the reason that you strike your thigh is that in time this will become the signal to come to heel with no words spoken, the secret of heel work is to not let your dog go in a straight line for long ie. keep changing your direction and as you do give the dog a sharp tug and tell him heel, as you can see this part off training can be carried out all most any where away from traffic a back garden or lawn is ideal, this is the first serious training that I start my dogs on this will take approx six weeks to instill in him what is required IE. where I go he goes when I stop he sits sitting can be carried out at feeding time by making the dog sit while his food is placed in front of him/her and making them wait a few minutes and not allowing the dog to feed untill you tell him to sit the dog step back a few paces place the food bowl in front of the dog step back a few more paces with your right hand raised in the air and look your dog in the eye this will unnerve him or her showing the dog that you are the master do not let the dog get the food untill you say so, if he moves put him back you will be surprised how quickly they pick this game up when you are ready lower your right arm approach the dog make a fuss of him and tell the dog to get on, I hope this is of some benifit to you if you get stuck you can all ways buy a good dog training book, there are lots on the market but not all tell you the little secrets.
www.callestr-labradors.co.uk
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thx for the tips callestr, we have been doing one thing lately that seems to have sorted Bradley out and that is to walk with him very close by and just slightly to the rear of us preferably near to a wall or something that impedes one side of us, if Bradley tries to step in front we make sure that he cant get past, if he does get past we stop immediately, saying a stern no, and make him sit, we then pause reproachfully and then continue. This is having wonderous effects :)
 

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My lab Troy is not yet allowed to go outside as he hasn't had his 2nd injection but when he does we will have him on a slip lead as the breeder reccomended this for heel work!
 
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leash work and heeling

hi labadmin
What happens when you run out of walls
regards callestr
 

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My last lab was trained on a choke chain and off the lead in parks.

she ws pretty good but we would never thave won any prizes for heal work becasue she was never required to be tidy. she was superb at heeling - in a sloppy way - but consistantly and close.

a particular training course i bought over the net recommends a regular lead and a policy of stopping immediately that your dog pulls, ignoring them completly until the stop pulling and repeating the process.

It makes no bones about the fact that your first walks will end up being very short (15 yards in 20 minutes !) but apparently th dog soon realises that it gts absolutely nowhere as soon as it pulls.

i can see how this approach would prove unbearably impractical for most owners but I can see the logic. All too often I suspect owners want to take their dog somewhere specific from day one so the dog ends up being dragged or pulling the whole way there rather than specifically going out to learn how to walk on the lead regardless of where you end up and how far you "walk".
 
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lead training/heel work

Hii stanley
What you have just stated is very true
most owners want to take their dogs for awalk and end up walking in a straight line for to long, the idea of taking and exercising their dogs at the same time as training does not occur to most owners.
Start your heel/lead training in a field, park, car park any small open space will do I use my back yard, away from distractions is always the best, as I have stated never let the dog pull in one direction change your direction give the lead a short sharp tug this will pull your dog of balance some thing they do not like. You may look a fool at the moment wandering around in all directions getting no where fast but I can assure you you will have the last laugh, when the compliments start coming in,on how well behaved your dog is. Ten minutes a day is all it takes to train, I think that to be sitting around for twenty minutes is time that could be well spent doing other things think of the proffesional trainers who may have ten to twenty dogs in their kennels in various stages of training I am quite sure they would not adopt such practises as it would take to long to achieve any thing, many people sell many things over the net a lot of it is just to make money.
What you are aiming for in the long term is to have what is called a no slip retriever one that will follow you around whilst at heel without its lead on, will not chase is steady to stock and will not leave your side untill told to do so, this I might add is only allowed away from traffic, any where there are roads or traffic then your dog should be on the lead at all times.
 

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Thanks for the advice.

I have plenty of time so for scientific interest I am going to try the stop till they stop pulling method.

If she doesn't get it firly quickly - its the chocke chain ! 8O
 

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what does everyone think about the choke chain i was toying with the idea of getting my black lab dylan one but other people who i talk to say that thet are cruel ? please help :p
 

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Semi choker

The guy who takes our obedience class trains all the police dogs and bomb dogs around our area. We were all supplied with a collar that has a triangular chain at the top of the collar like a small choker, all police dogs use these kind of collars.

The difference this made to Jess and her pulling was noticeable the minute we put her on it. When we walk her we hold the lead about 4 inches from the collar and give it short sharp tugs and tell her to heel the minute she walks past my knee.

They pick it up soon enough that when they walk past the knee they get pestered by the tugging.

The only thing i would say about the full choker is that it can rub away at the hair on the dogs neck which leads to bald patches, not very good for the dog!!!!

Hope this helps
 

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help!

We live in a very rural area- farms and fields and the beach- and consequently our 7mnth bitch Jet has become used to having walks off the lead. She is excellent at coming when called and various other commands but, since she was very small she has been a nightmare on the lead. Having taken her swimming almost every day since we got her, she is now very strong for an unusually small lab. The pulling is getting worse and im now panicking. Half choke chains have been tried, but she pulls so much she hurts her neck and makes that hollow choughing sound. Any adivce would be greatly appreciated :roll:
 

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Hi Daisydoodle
To give you more control as a temporary measure there are a number of collars / harness which will help you - Halti, Gentle leader, Lupi etc. If you decide to get one of the headcollars, make sure your dogs gets used to having it on before using it. I like the new Halti Harness that Roger Mugford has brought out. www.companyofanimals.co.uk
I’m not sure if prong collars and ecollars are illegal in the UK (don’t think so), but they are generally frowned upon.
They should give you more control, but it won’t replace training, so you will need to train her to walk to heel. I use the change direction, stop, change direction method already mentioned above. If you can get to training classes great, but remember, it needs to be practised and learnt everywhere.
The Walk With Me booklet is good too. http://www.learningaboutdogs.com/shop/books&vids.html
HTH
 

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Jet's pulling

Thankyou so much for the advice! I purchased the Halti lead and, after a few minutes where she resembled a bucking bronco, Jet is now getting better on the lead! No pulling! At least thats another problem out of the way, now for another plea for help: Im a virgin bitch owner. any tips for when Jet comes 'into season'?
Any advice greatly appreciated
:wink:
 
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