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Well Molly seems to enjoy runnig after her toys in the house...you can throw a sofr frisbee/tennis ball etc and she will at least pick it up and come back to you (well your area-ish) with it,
but when out in the park she will run after whatever you've thrown. then completely ignore it when she gets there..and will turn around and come back!..

Is it something that she will develop with time? or should I be doing some work on retrieval?
 

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hi jibber :)

rosze retrieves quite well and depending on her mood or what she has will bring it back to me and drop it..lol..she is 7 1\2 mnths old

brandy on the other hand is 6yrs and i have to just say to her find it and she goes running and brings me back her toy.
i found putting her favourite toy down somewere and telling her to *find it* was pretty good as soon as she touched the toy i praised her loads then moved onto pick it up if she picked it up another =huge fuss was made of her..then i moved onto to bring it here and she did..

rosze seems to do it naturally although she will not go hunt for her toys like brandy does..lol.


the other day i was being lazy and couldnt reach my sons sock so for a laugh i picked up his other sock rubbed it around brandys nose and told her to go find and to my utter amazement she brought back my sons sock.. :lol: :lol: ....
 

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Hi jibber...

The only way i an get Frodo to retrieve is by bribing him ( offer him a treat for every retrieving act :roll: ) .... NO treats wud mean he just run around with whatz thrown or cud not be bothered...

Secondly i noticed outside our house there is so much distraction and these guys are just so curious....(treats fail here) :cry: whoever said that labbies wud do anything for food lolz

Smiles
Vidhya
 

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Hi again Jibber. At 6 months old you have all the time in the world. Let me just describe to you how I set about training the retrieve. Bear in mind that my dogs are going to be worked so the retrieve is maybe a little more formal than what you may be looking for. So saying, although I want it right it, should and must still be fun.

I start very young, 8 weeks old in fact. Nothing stressful, just good fun. Because it is going to be a job of work I don’t use a toy, even at this early stage. As the puppy is soon going to be retrieving a gundog dummy then I want to use something which looks something like this. I stuff an old sock with other socks then sew the open end down to form a sausage approximately two inches diameter by about seven inches long and it is with this dummy that I start the training.

The next thing is where to train? Because I want 100% attention I choose the calmest quietest place I can find, my living room! I move the furniture away from a corner and position myself about four foot out from the corner and equal distant from each wall. I shake the dummy around to get the puppy’s attention then toss it into the corner. I don’t restrict the puppy at all at this stage. (Remember, a moving target is more interesting than a stationary one.) Done right the puppy wont be able to resist chasing it and having picked it up I can call the puppy back. Positioned as I am, sitting or kneeling on the floor I can reach both walls so can “Gather” the puppy up without allowing it to run past me. I never take the dummy away from the puppy until after I have praised it. Just think about this. “I go and get the thing and as soon as I get hold of it that Damn man pinches it! Next time I’m not taking it anywhere him!” More problems are caused by taking the dummy quickly than about any other part of the training! Tel him how pleased you are and how happy he makes you, then quietly and gently take the dummy. Do two or three retrieves then finish and put the dummy away. Don’t leave the dummy laid around. You want to finish leaving him wanting to do more and you want him to look upon the dummy as something special.

During this time I am also working (Separately) on the recall. I use a confined space, a hallway in my case, so that the puppy cannot get it wrong. In common to most working gundog trainers I never use food or titbits in training. What I use is well timed praise, quiet for the boisterous puppy, more exuberant for the quiet laid back puppy. Timing is everything. If you are working on the recall then praise the pup AS SOON AS IT GETS TO YOU! Don’t wait for it to sit first or you wont in fact be praising the recall at all!

As the retrieve starts to become more reliable I will start to move a bit further out of the corner. But remember, if the puppy starts to try to slip past you, move back until you are in a position to be able to prevent it. Later still, when the puppy is really enjoying it I will move outside onto the lawn. Again, if things go wrong I don’t hesitate to move back a stage and build it up again. Even when I finally take the retrieve out into the field or park I choose a time and place when I can be pretty sure of peace and quiet. If I get there and find the conditions are not to my liking they I just go for a walk instead. I never work if the conditions are not right. I want success and if I don’t get it then I have nothing to praise my puppy for and that’s a situation I try at all cost to avoid!

As soon as I see the puppy is changing to it’s adult teeth I stop all retriever training. It is too easy to catch a loose tooth and hurt the puppy, and if that happens, it could put the puppy off retrieving and put me back weeks! During this time I’ll concentrate on stays, recalls and heelwork, only returning to retrieves when all the adult teeth are through.

The break between loosing the puppy teeth and finishing growing the adult teeth forms the ideal break between a puppy play retrieve and a formal retrieve. From now on there is no running in after the retrieve, it is sit and wait until sent. By this time, (about 6 months old) most Labradors can hold a full size 1 lbs gundog dummy so this again is the right time for the change. Gradually we move on to retrieving more than one dummy, blind retrieves (Retrieves where the dog did not see the dummy thrown) Directional control, water retrieving, the variations are endless!

All through training we have attempted to make the area around us the most interesting place to be. This is where all the fun happens. A by product of this is that we now have a dog who, when out, only want to be where we are.

Hope you have found this interesting.

Regards, John
 

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John.....Thanks a Million.... IT WAS VERY INTERESTING......I just love the way you make it sound so easy and simple....

I fear Frodo wud fail but i'lls till try... but since hez used to retrieving for treats i have doubts he'd care for the praise.... :?

I realised a mistake in our tarining...I pull the toy off his mouth 8O ... No wonder he takes the toys and runs around.....

JOhn this also brings my attention to a game that frodo plays....He picks up a toy in his mouth and wants us to run behind him.... So we have frodo with a toy in his mouth runing and we following.... This is done in the hall and he runs behind out sofa... IS THIS HEALTHY GAME?????

I've also realised that he has no value for his toys....coz he has them whenever he wants :( .... Just gets bored of them so fast....

John i gotta change my the way of upbringing frodo... and yes you said it so right...i gotta makes things so interesting around me...... I fear he wud be considering me a BIG BORE :lol: ......

Thanks once again John
Vidhya
 

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Here's a couple of thoughts for you Vidhya. Although Anna is a working girl she has a total of 11 toys scattered around the floor! The only thing missing is the dummy. That makes the dummy special! It only comes out on special occasions, TRAINING!

One reason I never use treats is because it messes up the timing! I cannot reward her until I've taken the dummy away. In other words, I dont get to reward her for bringing it to me at all! I would be only rewarding her for parting with it and the sooner she drops it the sooner shes able to take the treat!! It's actually encouraging her to drop the dummy! Now imagine she was bringing me a pheasant which was not dead. If she dropped that it would be three fields over before I could get to it.

As to games of chase, I never chase my dogs. The reason being, I dont want them realising they can run faster! As long as they think I can always get to them they are far less likely to try it on. Obviously they soon realise dogs are faster than humans but by then I hope the behaviour patten is set.

Regards, John
 

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Thanks John.....

I've saved your advise wud need to read it again,,,, at this moment i have greater worries....can you pls read a post with topic "Chasing Kids" and help me out... You just seem to know their pychology so well....

Kind Regards
Vidhya
 
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