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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all

So ive got an interesting question for you all, a friend has always wanted a Rottweiler its her favorite breed she loves them as much as i love labs and she doesnt want any other breed but rotties but she has been told by a few good breeders that you need experience before owning a Rottie and that there not a breed for the first time dog owner.

Now i like some breeders suggested she started with a lab and then get her Rottie but shes not in love with labs at all and doesnt know if she should go with a lab first or instead get experience through being a puppy raiser for guide dog ect.

Shes mainly concered that if she owns a lab that she will treat the Rottie more special as she loves rotties and feels its not right to own a dog or breed that you dont love.

Do you agree?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nothing at all wrong with a good temperament Rottie. If she likes Rotties, wants a Rottie then I would go for a rottie. I've handled plenty of rotties in the past.
Thanks John , she has spent the last 2yrs getting to know who the Good breeders are and who breeds for good temperments and health and all of the Good breeders have told her Rotties are not for newbies and that she shoukd own an easier breed first like a lab but as i Said she worried about having a breed she doesnt love?

I think she will be fine and once she has that little lab puppy in front of her she will fall in love with her lab even if she doesnt love the breed i still think she would love her own lab but shes worried about taking on any breed she doesnt love and thought of gaining experience through being a puppy walker for guide dogs?

Do you think she should not feel guilty of getting a breed like a lab first just to gain experience so she can have a rottie?
 

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Labrador pups can be hard work, yes they are pretty easy as adults, but the pups are like crocodiles and into everything. I don't think there is such a thing as an easy pup, all breeds will have different traits, Labradors are bred to retrieve so pretty mouthy, combined with puppy sharp teeth that doesn't make them an easy breed necessarily. Yes, they are a popular assistance dog because they are intelligent, but certainly not easy, not at least as pups.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So you dont agree with the advice that labs are easier and better for first time owners?

I dont by the way i think a dog is only hard if not suited to the person or the person has no clue what there doing
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I should also point out that the rottie breeders said labs ect are easier because there easier to train than a rottie and that labs are more forgiving of mistakes than a rottie and as a first time owner your going to make mistakes.

They also said if it goes wrong with a lab you just have an annoying out of control dog were with a Rottie you will have a dog who if it goes wrong it goes badly wrong and so having experience helps to raise a rottie to be a confidant happy adult.

The thing is she was going to get a trainer to help her from the beginning and was going to spend a few years around rotties abd even go on rotties walks to learn as much as possible before getting one
 

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I wouldn't say a well bred Rottie is any more difficult than a Labrador. Labradors are responsible for many more bites than Rotties, ok, so they are a much more numerous dog overall, but any dog is capable of biting, and there are a lot of poorly bred Labradors out there, so it can be a bit of a lottery when it comes to temperament.

Yes, Rotties are a guarding breed, but then Labradors and any other breed are capable of resource guarding, and that can lead to a dog that has the propensity to bite if pushed.

The only difficult breeds I'd think of are some of the older breeds, such as Basenji, the Akita breeds, and possibly dogs like the presa canario etc, which are pretty much bred for a poor temperament in comparison to other breeds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I fully agree with you i think she'd be fine as shes committed to putting the work in and is seeking help from the beginning as she said she'd rather prevent issues rather than fix.

Based on when ive met rotties out and about my impression is there big goofballs and ive always thought there similar to labs.

I can see why Rottie breeders before experience because of the poor reputation rotties have (unfair rep if you ask me) but like you said labs can be just as capable of what a Rottie can do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
She has asked on a Rottie facebook group who told her to get a Rottie if thats what she wants. One of the admins is a behaviorist and said that lab are not a starter breed and they can be harder than rotties if there not suited to you.

She said lots here have started with a Rottie and were fine And they told her she will be fine since she plans on doing the right training and socialization.

So a few told her labs are not easy people are misinformed about labs and think there getting a friendly well behaved dog but dont realise there a working dog who needs lots of exercise and training and socialization to be well behaved.

So they dont believe in the whole labs are easier than rotties and told her not to waste her or the labs time by getting a dog she doesnt want get your rottie.
 

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At least she's got some good common sense advice from experienced Rottie people. Interestingly (and I only know this as I'm a bit of a nerd) the name comes from red roof, something to do with the red clay tile roofs that were associated with where the breed originated, I think they were brought over when the romans invaded Europe.
 

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Wow, I think that’s a bit OTT and a bit sweary too 🤣🤣. Yes, they’re walking dustbins but none of mine are hyper and spend 90% of the day asleep or sitting or lying at my feet. A well bred Labrador is certainly not hyper. I’m sure John will tell you that even when they’re working they spend more time sitting around and need to remain calm and quiet. With training you get out what you put in, as with any dog. I love them, I’m on my 8th and have 4 currently. I find them versatile, so many things you can do with them in the way of doggy activities...agility, Flyball, obedience/rallyO, scent work, tracking, retrieving, canicross even doggy dancing. Something for everyone.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
She did say after that hes not as hyper with her as she does more with him but her mom doesnt listern and thats why hes hyper.

None of that put me off , i know labs are not easy like everyone says but i also dont believe any dog is easy just like labs i coukd find them easy because there perfect for me but my friend could find labs a nightmare because there not for her.

I do agree with her saying labs are not a starter breed but I'd add i dont believe any dog is , it only works if you are suited to the breed and the breed to you and If you put the time and effort into training them ect
 

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Hyper can be « created ». The more exercise they have, the more they need and expect. A mistake many make. From the start I teach mine that there’s down time, usually a couple of hours in the afternoon where they go in their boxes/crates and they learn to relax. I try to do brain exercises too.
 

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Completely agree with Maddie, although I have a very giddy youngster who would retrieve all day, if I did that with her, then I'm creating the problem. In actual fact I do very few retrieves when I train my dogs, you shouldn't have to train a retrieve, as this is what they do naturally. What you do train is the control, so the sit/stop, manners on lead and of course, the recall.

I would say they can be mouthier than some breeds as pups, simply because they are bred to use their mouths. Tau was terrible as a youngster, she didn't really calm down until about 3 years of age, and at points I looked like I was self harming, but she was the worst of mine.

When it comes to socialisation, again, if you let a dog meet and greet everyone and their dog(s) then that's what they expect, I purposefully don't allow this, and instead, try to get them to focus on me as a pup/youngster when anyone else is about. You need that so that when you're working them, they don't just think it's a great day to go and say hello to everyone else, and focus on you and what you're asking them to do.
 

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This is how a working Labrador spends most of it's working day. But being hyper is a training matter just like any other. I spend a lot of time siting on a seat in the park with my pup sitting beside me watching the world pass by, simple teaching my pups to sit quiet.

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
After speaking with her again i have found out that she didnt tell me everything. She might not want a lab but she said she did like Golden retrievers but she was told there more barky and whine a lot compared to labs and the reason this would be an issue is because she has a condition called hyperacusis which means loud noise causes pain in her ears and exessive or constant dog barking can make it worse smaller dogs especially cause issues for her. Rotties shes been ok with as there not massive barkers and tend to be quiet dogs who only bark for a reason and they have a deeper bark , Goldens she got mixed awnsers on some said they dont bark much and that as part of there job they had to be quiet or they wouldn't have been a very good gundog and others said theres is noisy and barks at everything which worried Her.

I told her that my limited experience of Goldens is that there not a Barky breed and ive not know then to be whiny and surley training can help with this and a good breeder with quiet parent's ect.

So i wanted to ask if it was between a Rottie or a Golden as a first dog which would you choose for a newbie and what are you inpressions or experience with Goldens?
 

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My gut would say Goldens but, as we’ve already discussed, it depends how much work you put in. I suspect, like with labs, barking can be genetic. The breeder of my dogs usually uses her own stud. She brought in a stud for a short while who turned out to be a barker. Puppies born from the mating with this dog proved to be barkers too.

You can’t tell and there’s no guarantees.
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
And again is suppose as shes committed to putting a lot of tine and effort in it wont make much difference if she picks Golden or Rottie as long as she picks the right one for her
 
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