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Discussion Starter #21
Hi all, just joined & so glad I found this forum & this post!!!
We pick up our beautiful 8 week old girl at the end of the month & I’ve read so much stuff about having the crate in your room with you initially that I was starting to feel guilty that we’ve never had any of our pets sleep upstairs & didn’t intend to with our new puppy. We have the crate in situ now (so our cats get used to a few doggy things in the run up!) and it’s at the bottom of the stairs in a big, safe, room with a tiled floor which is at the centre of the house, where she will have most supervised access to during the day to begin with. We will be easily be able to hear her during the night so keeping everything crossed that this works out ok!
As you can see this was my post and I’ll be honest I’m not an experienced lab owner so can only pass on my findings as opposed to giving sound tried and tested advice. But I would say as a newbie this forum has been most helpful on a number of topics I have posted! Our boy is now happily sleeping downstairs with no problems whatsoever and there was no issue in the transition from our room upstairs to downstairs but I would suggest following the advice of the more experienced owners out there! Good luck with your pup and enjoy!
 

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Never heard of juvenile vulva before. Is it something that’s present or obvious from very young? How is it diagnosed? How do you manage it & can it be treated
A Juvenile Vulva, or Recessed Vulva is pretty much how it sounds, the vulva, instead of standing outside the body is actually recessed into the Vagina. It's not a common thing, but it does occasionally happen. Because the Vulva swells when the bitch is on heat, it often pops out and the problem goes away.

The real problem occurs if the vulva does not pop out. Because it does not radiate the body temperature as much as normal the higher temperature becomes a breeding ground for infections, Vaginitis and Pyometra being two such. It's so important to keep the area clean, possible using wipes, and watching very carefully for any signs of infection, (The first sign is often smell.) Any muddy brown discharge is an immediate vet appointment!! (The normal season discharge varies from blood red to watery pink.) In the absolute worst situation there is an operation.

My one recommendation to anybody who's bitch has this, "Don't panic and get the bitch spayed before the first season." If you do that then you wont be giving her the chance for it to sort it's self out during the first season. Give nature the chance to sort it out first.
 

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It’s exactly how John describes. The vulva is recessed, looking like a tiny button. In itself it’s no a big thing however it can lead to UTIs and inflammation. We had that problem which lead to difficulties with toilet training. The senior vets at my practice were aware but one of the juniors hadn’t seen it before. I had to keep the vulval area clean with a wet wipe daily (and my male dog helped a lot too 🙄🙄). My vet said not to spay until she’d had at least two seasons, to ensure the vulva went back to normal. It has, after one season but she’s not going to be spayed anyway. There is also surgery that’s possible if the issue doesn’t resolve itself and I’d found a specialist vet who could have done it.

Not the best photo, but you get the idea.

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Same bitch after one season. 🤣🤣

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