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Interesting - letter to KC re "silver" labs (cross-posted)

http://notosilverlabs.wordpress.com/...nnel-club-u-k/

Open Letter to The Kennel Club (U.K.)
Posted on January 8, 2014 by Jack Vanderwyk
The Kennel Club
Attn governance

Copy to: the Labrador Breed Council; the Labrador Clubs in the United Kingdom

"Dear Board members of The Kennel club,

The Kennel Club maintains the studbook of the Labrador Retriever and has the task of ensuring that only purebred Labradors are registered in the studbook .
In that respect, it seems that the registry of the Labrador Retriever is about to go wrong, or has already gone wrong. This concerns not only me, but also the Labrador Clubs in the United Kingdom and abroad.

The cause of these concerns lies in the fact that more and more dogs are imported from the United States, with pedigree certificates from the American Kennel Club (AKC), which state that the dogs are Labrador Retrievers with the colours black, yellow or chocolate, while in reality these are dogs that are carriers of the so-called “dilute” (dd) gene. The dd gene is characterized by a “diluted” coat colour and light eyes, which are called “charcoal” or “blue” if the base colour is black, “champagne” if the base colour is yellow, and “silver” if the base colour is chocolate. In particular, the “silvers” are becoming more and more popular with the general public and substantial amounts of money are paid for puppies and adult dogs.

On first sight it seems that there is nothing to worry about these practices, because these dogs are imported with the recognized colours on their pedigree certificates, and as such they can formally be entered in the Kennel Club studbook. However, the duties of the Kennel Club as keeper of the studbook surpass that of formally administrator. One can not pretend that nothing is wrong, only because of the fact that the paperwork looks okay.

The fact is that the “dilute” (dd) gene or locus is alien to the Labrador Retriever breed. This gene is simply not present in the breed as we know it. In order to keep the studbook closed, and maintain the purity of the Labrador Retriever breed, the Kennel Club should ensure that no genes alien to the breed are entering the breed. Covert operations like opening a closed studbook in a sneaky way is not what the public expects from a respectable organization like the Kennel Club.

In the United Kingdom it was never possible to register dogs with the “dilute” (dd) gene as Labrador Retrievers. Until recently. The “dilute” (dd) gene surfaced in the United States in the late forties and early fifties of the last century. In those years there were no DNA tests available, and unfortunately these dogs were registered as Labrador Retrievers. The breeder who produced these dogs, Mayo Kellogg from Kellogg Kennels, was an important customer of the American Kennel Club (AKC). Kellogg bred several breeds, including the Weimaraner, a breed which carries the “dilute” (dd), and the dogs often ran free. Initially these dogs were registered as “silver”, until the Labrador Retriever Club Inc. (LRC), the parent club of the American Labrador Retriever clubs, objected against these practices. From that moment the “dilute” (dd) dogs were registered with the recognized three coat colours of the Labrador Retriever.

More than half a century later we sadly have to observe that the American studbook of the Labrador Retriever, as maintained by the American Kennel Club (AKC), contains more than 35,000 dogs that carry the “dilute” (dd) gene. Not all carriers are also phenotypically affected. However, these dogs that only carry the gene are passing it on to their offspring. This means that we simply can not be satisfied with a phenotypical (” by eye”) check, let alone by simply looking at an AKC pedigree certificate. Genetic research of these dogs by means of DNA tests will need to take place to make sure that the stud book stays closed. Any presence of the “dilute” (dd) genes in the Labrador Retriever is unacceptable.

Three renowned genetic laboratories, Vetgen, Laboklin, and the Van Haeringen Group, have confirmed to me in writing that it is perfectly possible to show the presence of the “dilute” (dd) gene. These studies have already been developed and can be used today. The costs are about 50 pounds.

Now science has progressed, it can be shown that the DNA of a dog contains genes which are alien to the Labrador Retriever breed, which means that such a dog CAN NOT be a purebred Labrador Retriever. Kennel Clubs, including the AKC, are increasingly under fire because of these extremely bad and dangerous developments, which need to stop here and now. It’s only a matter of time before the first lawsuit in the United States against the American Kennel Club appears, as the AKC in their pedigree certificates quite wrongfully gives the impression that these “dilutes” are purebred Labrador Retrievers. If the National Kennel Clubs are not willing or able to effectively guarantee or monitor the purity of a dog, then who is? And what is the value of a pedigree certificate?

The National Kennel Clubs have the means to prevent non-purebred dogs to enter the studbooks. If in doubt about the presence of the “dilute” (dd) gene in Labrador Retrievers, one should require the applicant of a pedigree certificate to proof that this particular dog or litter is free from the “dilute” (dd) gene, by means of DNA testing by accredited laboratories.
I would like to ask the Board of the Kennel Club to require that any Labrador Retriever that is imported in the United Kingdom has to show the results of a DNA test proving that the dog is free from the “dilute” (dd) gene. This should also apply to any Labrador Retriever when there are doubts about the purity, regarding the presence of the “dilute” (dd) gene.

Finally, I would like to ask the Board of the Kennel Club to look into the practices of registering “dilutes” with the remark “Colour Not Recognized”. Although these practices might seem to be effective, they are not. Breeders and owners of “dilutes” are clever enough to register their dogs with the recognized colours black, yellow and chocolate, and some Kennel Clubs, like the AKC, willfully cooperate with these frauds. A “silver” Labrador is not a chocolate Labrador, a “charcoal” Labrador is not a black Labrador, and a “champagne” Labrador is not a yellow Labrador, not even when a foreign Kennel Club has registered the dog as such. They are simply not purebred Labradors. The task of the Kennel Club is to guard the purity of the breed. This is a very serious task .Should it turn out that the Kennel Club is not willing to take this task seriously (enough), then there is always the possibility to let the Courts decide about these issues.

Yours sincerely,

Jack Vanderwyk"
 

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Just to show how some people view these colours, there was recently a litter advertised in this country, silver Labrador to a champagne Labrador, pups £1500 each!!! Whichever way you look at it that price is totally unjustified. It is simply aimed at rich fools who know no better than to pay extortionate prices for pups with poor pigmentation (As shown by the one featured in the advert.)

Regards, John
 

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Silver labradors

Hi, I've just joined the forum as we have a 6 month old gorgeous chocolate labrador pup from the same breeder selling the champagne labradors for £1500.
We are first time labrador owners, although my husband has had Dobermans before, and I've had terriers.
We saw our pup's mum but we were told the father was an American silver labrador, which meant nothing to us at the time, and we saw a photo of him.
One of the other pups that we were offered had a pink nose, and the breeder said this was rare, but we thought there was something wrong as all the other labradors we'd seen have black or brown noses.
We're certainly not rich at all, we paid £600 for our pup, maybe foolish for not researching the breed enough, but we found the breeder from the Kennel club list of labrador breeders, and we were shown the hip, elbow scores and eye tests which were all fine.
We've noticed our puppy has long legs, a long muzzle, she's quite tall and slender, and she has a single thin coat.
We're madly in love with her but she's very highly strung and hyperactive, so training her has been quite a challenge, she goes to classes now, but we've also been seeing a trainer every week.
Could I ask if anyone on here has experience of dogs with American or silver parents?
We mistakenly thought all labradors looked the same, think there should be more information available for prospective puppy buyers.
 

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Hi Juliette, £600 is about the right price for a top quality Labrador.

Pink noses, and light eyes like the pup in her advert are thankfully quite rare and as I said, are due to poor pigmentation. That does not make them any the less loveable, but to point to it as a selling point is being dishonest. Below is a photo of my Beth, (The lightest of the two) illustrating the poor pigmentation. One thing to bear in mind, dogs with poor pigmentation on their noses tend to get more problems with sunburnt noses.

Regards, John

 

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I see the pups are now on sale for £2000!!! Someone is having a laugh!

Regards, John

Edited to remove link.
 

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They're obviously aimed at people with more money than sense :evil:
 

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Have only come across two silver labs, both young dogs from the same litter. I didn't realise they were Labradors until I started to talk to their owner. He had payed quite a lot of money from them and was planning on breeding. They did have a lot finer coats and more pointed muzzles. Training wise they seemed bouncy but they were quite young and full of beans. It's also more difficult to train two pups together.
 

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Almost certainly Weimaraner in there somewhere The ears and colour point to it. As you say Lynda, "A fool and his money." But I hate to see people conned.

Regards, John
 

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silver labs

Buy a nice black lab at the going rate wait a few years and everyone can have a silver lab (all be it a bit of a patchy one)but still a highly desirable and well loved old gentleman.
Rach
 

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Now i stand fairly alone in the breeding community in not really giving a stuff that these idiots are registering probable crosses as 'special colours'. But what does annoy me is how the public are being ripped off in the main... But then i see so little difference between flogging labradoodles and pugadors and other such stupid purely 'marketing slogan' dogs that the whole silver/champagne thing just makes me feel are there really people out there so stupid to buy one? To not do the smallest bit of research and discover there is no such thing...? And the answer is yes.... Lol.

i think these silver/champagne people are crafty, clever and going to be driving a better car than me in the next year ... Lol lol. Its total b*ll*cks if course... But then so much in marketing is. If you believed macdonalds, their grub is almost healthy... 😊😊😊

i just cant wait to meet a 'silver' owner out, and ask them how much they paid for their crossbred dog. Wink.

Di
 

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John, could you delete the link to the ad, pretty please? Would hate to think of such a breeder being given free publicity here Sad
Done Angela. I only put it here to show people what we were talking about.

John :)
 

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I've posted these before, Tau is one of the palest chocs I have come across, but she's definitely chocolate. She bleaches to an even paler colour as well.





 

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Jo, dogs of Tau's colour definately will be flogged as silvers for sure. Especially in the pic with the flash bouncing off her. people are so nieve that chocolate doesn't HAVE to come in dark 'Bourneville' tone, they probably will like believing anything but is something 'different and special' and then some clever soul will grab that with both hands and charge more for it - :)

Di
 

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:twisted:

Couldn't resist looking at the "LINK" John!!!,(looked quick before it disappeared) there is also an AD for the cheaper ones, only one and a half grand 8O, they are "laughin' all the way to the bank" :twisted:

If anyone wants a dog that looks "unusual", go to a rescue and get a mongrel, then get its DNA checked to find out what it is :D


Chel and Dilys xxx
 

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Hi Wendy
Can I ask you if your lab with the American sire has a calm nature?
Not bothered about the looks so much, though I have been asked if my dog is a full labrador because of her long legs, lean body and long muzzle.
I couldn't upload a photo on here.
Rose
 

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Diana said:
Jo, dogs of Tau's colour definately will be flogged as silvers for sure. Especially in the pic with the flash bouncing off her. people are so nieve that chocolate doesn't HAVE to come in dark 'Bourneville' tone, they probably will like believing anything but is something 'different and special' and then some clever soul will grab that with both hands and charge more for it - :)

Di
I've seen a couple *like* Tau for sale as chocs Di. I've not come across one in the flesh ever, but she's a medium choc colour when her coat isn't bleached.



The photo shows her half way through a moult.
 

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No sorry I phrased that badly. I meant, yes most of tau's colour will be bred by honest people who sell them as chocs... but yes, her exact shade probably WILL be, by the few cunning individuals, flogged as 'silvers'. She is exactly the shade *they* would be able to just about pull the wool over eyes because she's 'unusual'.

Di
 
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