Labradors Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 6 month-old labrador, Misty, displayed some disturbing behaviour to me and my partner when we were out walking her the other day. She was off the leash in a park, and as we walked towards the golf course a man came out of nowhere with some clubs and Misty went crazy! She was jumping, barking and growling, and the hairs on the back of her neck were up. We restrained her but I was completely shocked afterwards. Misty has never done this before and I put in extra effort to socialise her from the day we got her - she has met nearly everyone in the community and normally wags her tail and gets excited when she sees other people! Does anyone know why she would have lunged at this man? I am very confused, I love her dearly and I dont want her to become an aggressive, biting dog. :(
 
G

·
Maybe she was just spooked!

Rueben loves everyone but if something makes him jump he does go all defensive (barking, hackles up etc)

Maybe this man just appearing from nowhere made Misty jump and her natural reaction was to bark.

I'm no expert though, I'm sure someone more experienced will be along soon with some better info/advice!

Anita & Rueben
xXx
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,336 Posts
it may be a one off but you are right in wanting to do something about it.

go to a GOOD dog club - and explain that you want to set up your dog meeting a lot of people - under control............

ensure that your control commands are good - recall - down/stop on the run etc

good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,124 Posts
It could be that if this man was carrying his golf clubs she didn't know what they were and saw them as a potential threat to both her and you.
So rather than just been aggressive maybe she was trying to protect you from this unknown threat.

If you say you've socialised her then it probably wasn't the man that upset her rather than the unfamilliar things her was carrying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,127 Posts
I have found that mine can get really spooked at around your pup's age if the siloette (spelling?) of a human isn't 'right'. Occasions that have caused over-reactions in my pups have been a person with a large backpack and a person wearing a hoody pulled down so that you couldn't see a face.

I wouldn't read too much into it. Maybe you can hang around golf clubs, or even start carrying one about for a while, just to show her that it's no big deal.

When it's happened with me, I've just calmly put the lead on the pup, explained to the person why she is barking and then ignore the pup until she's calmed down and is quiet. Normally, once they see that the object of their fear is ok, they look a little sheepish!

I would consider it as aggression - more like a rather OTT worried reaction to something that spooked them. At 6 months it's not uncommon for pups to start to see the world as a bit more scarey than it was a month or so again. Also, so could be coming up to her first season, which can make bitches rather silly!

Becs and The Gang
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,504 Posts
Seriously, this as the ladies say above is absolutely not an aggression problem, this is a, lack of socialisation to that one thing, problem. She was going 'Ohhhh my goooood its a bloody monster! A monster! Oh Christ I am scared and i'm going to try and sound REALLY fierce to make you go away Mooooonster!!!!!'

Sadly we can't find every single thing when socialisaing that the dog may come up against (and when something they haven't met before springs itself on them like the golfer they are even MORE taken aback!) so when this happens use it as a green light that you need to do a bit more.

We tend to get to a certain amount of months old and then stop finding new things for them to see. Its natural. But this is a wake up call that she has some gaps and you need to expose her to something similar in a positive way several times pretty soon. Or don't, but this will be her reaction next time tooo, if you understand what i mean. Take her back to the same place. Take some food, and sit and watch the golfers come and go, distracting her and playing with her. Its only a few minutes work but it makes a huge difference. Doing it a couple of times makes a MASSIVE difference.

Di
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,440 Posts
Luna's had the same response to things that shouldn't be in the woods we used to walk in. Once it was a wheelbarrow, then it was bikes tied up to a tree, then a little signpost directing a run. She's used to all of these things just not on HER woodland path walk!!!!!!!

I'd guess that Misty felt the same - the golfer was unexpectedly on her walk. You've had some good advice above that I can't add to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,164 Posts
I read this and it was very familiar to me.

Rosie did the same thing; we had her for a few weeks and although we had the usual problems with her being strong on the lead, she was very good off-lead when we were up at the park. One evening I was walking her at the field and suddenly, two tall teenage lads just came out of the bushes. They gave me a start as well, to tell you the truth! Rosie was off lead about 12 feet from me, and she dropped her ball, went into a very defensive stance, her hackles went up, and she set up a helluva growl; showing teeth, the works. She'd gone from a bouncing, happy girlie running back to me with her ball to a psycho dog within 2 seconds flat.
I have to admit I paniced and my first instinct was to shout her name followed by the command "DON'T!" which we use. It had no effect whatsoever, although I was glad she didn't advance towards the men. I gathered my composure a bit and gave her some calming words in a reassuring tone, and as the men made a hasty exit, she picked up her ball and trotted over to me. I was so shocked that I put her back on her lead and took her home at once; it really did spook me.

We had some more odd behaviour the following week, she was particularly wilful, a bit out-of-sorts, and even showed aggression to other dogs when she was on her lead. We were starting to get really worried and then hey-ho... her first season. She was spayed after her first season and we never saw any behaviour like this again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,224 Posts
Jane mentions exactly what I was thinking.
Most bitches get a little hormonal/emotional in the weeks leading up to their season.
This can cause behaviour which you don't usually see, and it can seem as though the personality of your bitch is changing - but it's just temporary.
At 6 months she will possibly be coming up towards her first season, so my first thought was that she could be a bit hormonal, and couple that with the shock of seeing a "monster" as described by Di, that could well be your answer.

Perhaps it's almost time to put a white sheet on her bed to keep an eye out for spots?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,009 Posts
Roo is prone to doing this at anything slightly unusual. Off the top of my head, it's been:

A boy bouncing a basket ball and coming out from a gap in a hedge just as we were there - startling both of us!

An oil drum on a walk that isn't usually there

A charity bag of clothes at the side of the road

A jumper tied to a fence and blowing in the wind

A man with a motorbike helmet on

A rambler with a massive rucksack and two walking poles

What a silly dog! As others have said, just take it as a cue to do more socialisation with the particular 'scary' thing. Try and think of anything unusual (use the things people have listed in this thread as ideas) and socialise to that too! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,191 Posts
Yes, Cadbury has had these moments too, I even asked my trainer (who knows him by now inside out) and she said it is the shape, as Becs said. Doggy eyesight is not as good as ours and they do go by the shape of things a lot. Odd shapes worry them.

A few things Cadbury has been spooked;
Stone pig ornament in next door's garden
Old woman with pullalong shopping trolley
Girl with long hair sitting on bicycle (I think because she was stationary instead of moving)
And once a man walking by.

My usual response is either take him up to the object (such as the stone pig) or walk off with him (this has always happened on the lead) and act nonchalant. He has never reacted to the same thing twice, so I guess I must be doing right. In fact saw the lady with the pullalong trolley the other day and all he wanted to do was go over and make friends.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top