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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

My 3 year old chocolate lab is my first ever dog. He started limping about 6 weeks ago and would make a clicking sound and struggle to get up after exercise. I took him to my vet who felt his knee and diagnosed a twisted ligament. He put him on a 2 week course of rimadyl and told me to call in 2 weeks with an update. I called and told the receptionist that Dyson had improved a little but the lameness had returned once the medication had run out.

The receptionist said that it was likely the vet would recommend continuing with the medication so she would get 30 days worth ready for me to collect. When I collected I was told the vet recommend Dyson would now be on these tablets for life.

The vet didn't re-examine Dyson and he has taken no xrays or anything and I was just wondering if this is normal?

I would really appreciate any advice from experienced dog owners as to whether I should accept the decision and keep my dog on this medication for life, as he is still quite young and I've read that rimadyl can cause renal issues with long term use.

Many thanks for reading!

Dyson's Human
 

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No, that's not normal, and I wouldn't want a dog on rimadyl for any length of time either, particularly one so young, I could understand it with an oldie where it may help but rimadyl has known side effects and starting a younger dog on it with the intention of keeping them on it for a long period of time isn't a good option. For NSAIDs I prefer metacam, there are still possible side effects as there are with all drugs, but rimadyl has been documented to affect some breeds more than others, retrievers being one of them.

Personally, I would change vets and ask for your boy to be diagnosed properly so he can be treated, if he has injured his cruciate then it may be that rest and medication and a rest will sort him out, but you need to know what the damage is so you can be sure that rest and medication will sort it out, and not just delay treatment for something that hasn't been diagnosed properly. My old girl, now sadly no longer with us, fully ruptured her anterior cruciate ligament as a youngster, and the vet just left me with her leg dangling. After 4 days I self referred to another vets, as I wasn't willing to wait for the specialist they were trying to get hold of, to pick up the phone. She was treated within 24 hours and had a long recovery of six months, but with careful management she had a good life right up to when I lost her at 14 1/2 last year. She did have problems with her other knee years later, and this is because once one knee becomes injured, they favour the other leg, and so eventually that one is also prone to injury.

So if you're not happy with the service from your vet, remember, you are a paying customer, you either push for the service you want or you take your custom elsewhere.
 

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Before even considering medicating for life I'd want to know the reason for the medication. I know about covid and all that but thats no excuse for half hearted diagnosis. A twisted ligament?? Where exactly? I doubt luxating patella's, thats something that can come and go. I once handled a Japanese Spitz at a show. Half way across the ring the patella popped out and he started to limp but when I turned it went back in and the limp was gone. Thats typical for luxating patella's. My thought is more likely Cruciate Ligament, and depending on how bad that can be complete rest to an operation. But whatever, you need to know what you are dealing with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No, that's not normal, and I wouldn't want a dog on rimadyl for any length of time either, particularly one so young, I could understand it with an oldie where it may help but rimadyl has known side effects and starting a younger dog on it with the intention of keeping them on it for a long period of time isn't a good option. For NSAIDs I prefer metacam, there are still possible side effects as there are with all drugs, but rimadyl has been documented to affect some breeds more than others, retrievers being one of them.

Personally, I would change vets and ask for your boy to be diagnosed properly so he can be treated, if he has injured his cruciate then it may be that rest and medication and a rest will sort him out, but you need to know what the damage is so you can be sure that rest and medication will sort it out, and not just delay treatment for something that hasn't been diagnosed properly. My old girl, now sadly no longer with us, fully ruptured her anterior cruciate ligament as a youngster, and the vet just left me with her leg dangling. After 4 days I self referred to another vets, as I wasn't willing to wait for the specialist they were trying to get hold of, to pick up the phone. She was treated within 24 hours and had a long recovery of six months, but with careful management she had a good life right up to when I lost her at 14 1/2 last year. She did have problems with her other knee years later, and this is because once one knee becomes injured, they favour the other leg, and so eventually that one is also prone to injury.

So if you're not happy with the service from your vet, remember, you are a paying customer, you either push for the service you want or you take your custom elsewhere.
Thank you so much for the advice, I will ask the vet to investigate further or I'll get a new vet. Thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Before even considering medicating for life I'd want to know the reason for the medication. I know about covid and all that but thats no excuse for half hearted diagnosis. A twisted ligament?? Where exactly? I doubt luxating patella's, thats something that can come and go. I once handled a Japanese Spitz at a show. Half way across the ring the patella popped out and he started to limp but when I turned it went back in and the limp was gone. Thats typical for luxating patella's. My thought is more likely Cruciate Ligament, and depending on how bad that can be complete rest to an operation. But whatever, you need to know what you are dealing with.
Thank you, I'll ask my vet some specifics so I have the information to make a proper decision. Thanks for taking the time to advise me.
 
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