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Hi all. We have Two labradoodles one has no doodle just lab . They are both fantastic 10 month od dogs brother and sister from the same litter. They are crated at home for bed etc and in the boot with a guard . However Olive the lab has eaten 4 rear seatbelts .I Could cry. They have toys etc loads of exercise .I have had to put the crate in the boot also but they look cramped . Any suggestions !!!!!
 

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Of course, it depends on the size of your car. I have a Volvo 940 (25 years old, had from new!) and have a Barjo car crate in the back. Plenty of room for two dogs and I know they are safe.

Within reason, the smaller the area the better. In the event of an accident they will not be thrown around so much. But I have to ask, if they are behind a dog guard how do they get to the seat belts?
 

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Crate every time but make sure it’s a crash tested version not just a wire crate. A little cramped isn’t a problem for just short journeys.
 

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I'm assuming your crate isn't a custom fitted one?
Although they're rather expensive a custom fitted crate would be your best option, they give the most room yet keep the car's fittings safe from chewing dogs.
I have a TransK9 in my car, which I would highly recommend, but there are plenty of other makes, Lintran, Barjo, Guardsman.
 
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Grille Dog Automotive lighting Vehicle Motor vehicle

Another vote for TransK9
 

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Our pups are about to hit 14 weeks. At present we use an Ellie Bo boot crate however it’s quite flimsy. It’s one on loan to us and pretty soon they will both have outgrown it. We are looking to get the Travall system which consists of a rear guard and also a divider which you buy specifically for your make of car (www.travall.co.uk). We intend to use a short seatbelt connection from the back seat, which will pass through the ski-panel (nope we don’t go skiing!) to then connect to their harness. One dog will do in each side.

However, it’s interesting seeing the reinforced crates shown on this post, as do worry about someone rear-ending the car. Have had that happen whilst stationary at traffic lights because someone was not paying attention. I think I will so’s check these out, thank you
 

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A thought for you Toosh1054. Rear dog guards must be reported to your insurance company, otherwise it can invalidate your insurance. When I first heard about this I phoned my insurance company to check the facts and was told that as rear dog guards have to be attached then they are considered to be a "Modification" to the car, so as such yes, they do need reporting. Dog crates such as the Barjo which I use, because they are not attached and can be slid out, are considered as "Luggage" and dont need reporting.

As a question, why would you secure your dogs to the seat belt? When in the cage they only have limited room to move about in so it should not be necessary.
 

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A thought for you Toosh1054. Rear dog guards must be reported to your insurance company, otherwise it can invalidate your insurance. When I first heard about this I phoned my insurance company to check the facts and was told that as rear dog guards have to be attached then they are considered to be a "Modification" to the car, so as such yes, they do need reporting. Dog crates such as the Barjo which I use, because they are not attached and can be slid out, are considered as "Luggage" and dont need reporting.

As a question, why would you secure your dogs to the seat belt? When in the cage they only have limited room to move about in so it should not be necessary.
Hi John, that's a great point you make there regarding insurance. I have taken a look at the K9 crates and they did not appear to be bolted into the car, but I might have missed something.

Regarding your seatbelt query, the Trav-all system isn't an enclosed crate as such just the usual grill above the rear seat to block access, with a divider attached to create two separate areas. I didn't consider these areas to be as snug as a crate would be, especially as still young puppies, so thought of using the seatbelts to give more stability for the dogs. It's also a consideration to stop them leaping out of the boot when it is opened. I appreciate we can train them to remain in place, though at present they are crated.

On a more concerning note, we heard of a recent experience of someones boot not being closed properly, resulting in it popping open and the dog falling out as they started to drive up the road, which is horrendous. Luckily they lived on a quiet road and the dog wasn't hurt.
 

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I personally like crates, for the reason I can easily slip it out if I want to carry something large. But in my case, Having a Volvo 940 estate space is not a problem. I also carry a padlock so that on a hot day I can lock the crate and leave the back of the car open so the dogs have plenty of ventilation but nobody can steal them.
 

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The transK9 aren’t bolted because they’re quite heavy and designed to fit snugly, they are crash tested and also have an escape hatch at the back of the cage in the event of the you not being able to open the boot/rear door. Mine is a double crate with a sturdy but removable central panel, two doors which are lockable. Best investment I ever made. I’ve had soaking dogs in there, vomiting dogs too. My car has stayed clean and I can just lift it out and hose it down if it gets dirty on the inside.
 
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