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I know it’s still very early but we have had our 14 week old chocolate lab for three weeks now and she is showing no signs of knowing her name and no progress on recall. The only way to get her to come in after her last wee before bed is to sit on the floor and suggest I’ve got something or run outside and get her to chase me in.
any tips?
 

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Golden rule of recall, don't recall unless you know they will. Otherwise they are learning how long they can ignore you for. If she isn't going to come to you, and you know this, then go and get her.
 

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Golden rule of recall, don't recall unless you know they will. Otherwise they are learning how long they can ignore you for. If she isn't going to come to you, and you know this, then go and get her.
100% right!

Remember, the command you use for the recall is just a sound to your pup, it has no meaning. So the first job is to teach your pup to associate that sound to an action. The way I used to explain it to my class, If I was English and you were French, and you spoke no English, If I said "Sit" to you then you would have no idea what I was saying. But If I put a chair behind you, said "sit" and gently eased you down onto the chair, I would not need to do it many times before you would start to get the idea as to what the sound "Sit" meant. And so with your dog.
Command, Action, Praise.
 

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We played a good game for this at training.

Throw a treat about 1m away and as soon as the puppy gets it, call her name, and reward her (excited voices, lots of fuss, more treats) when she comes back to you. We used basic kibble to throw out, and higher value treats when Freddie came back. As she gets the hang of it you can throw the treats out further each time.

Freddie has always been relatively good at it, but we often take really good treats like a little bag of raw meat out on walks with us and practice recall just for the sake of it.
 

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I know it’s still very early but we have had our 14 week old chocolate lab for three weeks now and she is showing no signs of knowing her name and no progress on recall. The only way to get her to come in after her last wee before bed is to sit on the floor and suggest I’ve got something or run outside and get her to chase me in.
any tips?
When we have a pup with this type of personality, we use long lines for training. We have them in three lengths for daily use (along with a 20' for beach trips and so on). The lines are 6 inches, 3 feet and 12 feet. They are very light and don't get caught up in furniture and other hazards like tree roots and shrubs.

Whenever the pup is outside, the longest line is on them. When we are ready to bring them inside, we either walk up and first step on, then pick up the line and begin to walk saying "this way", "heel" or "inside" or whatever command is appropriate. If this is not feasible, I have a piece of foil in my pocket that I will grab and begin to make noise with as I kneel down looking at the ground....the puppy will inevitably become curious about what it is I am so focused on and will come over. I pick up the line and do the same as if I'd stepped on it. Using this technique, the puppy never gets to be the one who is in control because once they learn it - i.e. once you have chased them - they learn who it is that really is in control when they are "free".

In the first weeks of training, the middle length line is used inside the house; it simply trails along behind them and can be used to get them out from under a piece of furniture, stop the puppy ignoring a command and so on.

Once we nearly have the voice trained, we switch to the 6 inch length inside the house. This one is simply when you need to get their attention.

This technique is not always needed, but for some of the more independent pups, it speeds up their understanding of what it is we want from them, which is the most important part of training anything.
 
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