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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all

It's been a while since I've been on here but have recently seen loads of articles people have posted via Facebook etc about new warnings on the dangers of feeding raw bones to dogs.... I thought you weren't supposed to feed COOKED bones but raw was ok?

Monty has a couple of chicken wings or pork ribs once a day and I'm now wondering if this poses a danger to him?

Have a read and tell me what you think
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/09/17/give-the-dog-a-bone-vets-warn-pet-owners-not-to-do-it/
 

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It's a case of your wrong if you do and your wrong if you don't.

So, the facts. Cooked poultry bones are a big No no, end of statement. By and large these are small easily broken bones which when cooked are hard and brittle. These bones can easily pierce the throat, stomach, intestines or bowel. THEY ARE DANGEROUS!!!

Fed raw these bones are relatively soft and chewable, particularly chicken wings which many people feed. But they are still not without risk, although the risk is not from the bones themselves, rather from what they may carry. Salmonella is the biggest risk here.

Possibly the same thing applies to other bones. Cooked chop bones are brittle like chicken bones and should never be fed. Beef marrow bones are probably better raw, although in the days of my first dog at the time of food shortages at the end of WW2, if there was any meat on the bone they went into a beef stew along with any other meat we had before my dog got a look in. Again there is a risk, but not as great as poultry.

But then, bones are not needed in a dog's diet. Yes they are great for keeping a dog amused, but food value is minimal. I've not fed bones to my dogs for the last 50 years.

Regards, John
 

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"Latest figures from the PDSA showed that last year its hospitals treated 59 dogs who swallowed bones, although no figures for injuries or fatalities were available."

Considering the several million dogs in the country I'd say the risks are rather low! Particularly when they cant even tell us how many of that 59 were serious cases. I'd guess the Telegraph was running short of news to print that day!

John :)
 

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The article mentions a ham knuckle bone and I wonder if it was smoked? Here, Canada, knuckle bones (don't know if ham or beef) can be found smoked at butcher shops and pet stores and I've found some sales staff think that equated to raw. I tried one, it splintered as my dog was gnawing on it, no more smoked for us. I cannot find a raw knuckle bone.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Wowser-that looks like a dinosaur bone!!

John, it would seem as you say, you can't do wrong for doing right. We feed raw mixed with dry diet purely as we'd read the benefits to clean teeth (especially with chicken wings) and we've found bones help firm up his stools. Perhaps we're wrong?

So far, no issues apart from one mishap where a bone got stuck between his teeth (easily fixed). We do watch him and he adores his evening bone!

Perhaps a bigger bone that can't be ingested but just gnawed at would be better?

Hmmm, smoked could be the case-we never feed cooked for all the dangerous things we've read
 

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But they are still not without risk, although the risk is not from the bones themselves, rather from what they may carry. Salmonella is the biggest risk here.
Take a look at this, small numbers I know and from one side of the fence so probably slightly biased too!

http://www.rawfeedingrebels.com/can-you-get-salmonella-e-coli-raw-dog-food/

But then, bones are not needed in a dog's diet. Yes they are great for keeping a dog amused, but food value is minimal. I've not fed bones to my dogs for the last 50 years.
Great for keeping the teeth clean! And coming from a different angle, what do you think is in your chicken kibble, finest chicken breast? ;)
 

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I suspect more dogs are taken in for kibble related issues ;)

I feed raw. However, my George will tear though a huge raw bone -- and end up bunged up. So I get what the French call "os à moelle" (sliced marrow bone). They get a chop but not enough bone to bung him up. That said, no issues with Alfie.
 

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But then, bones are not needed in a dog's diet. Yes they are great for keeping a dog amused, but food value is minimal. I've not fed bones to my dogs for the last 50 years.

Regards, John
Don't you need to feed bones, whole or ground up, for the calcium content if you feed a raw diet?
 

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Possibly for a raw diet, but I think in most cases this is where people feed chicken wings. But then again, we also need calcium, but we don't eat bones, so do dogs fed raw really need bones??

In the old days the old gamekeepers used to chuck a dead Pheasant or Rabbit into the kennel for their dogs. They swore the dogs needed everything including fur and feathers.

But then again, the only raw diet I know anything about is a nice salad for me on a summer's day. :)

John
 

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We give Judy a raw marrow bone about twice a week; also sometimes some raw rib bones or oxtails.
Our butcher has now started charging (on and off) citing that offal now very desired by the East Europeans and trendy set!!!!!

Shame these aren't from tyranasoriusrex as pictured above

We never give chicken bones, raw or cooked
I must confess to her getting the odd cooked rib chop now and then - maybe we'll stop that from now on???

Judy loves bones and we think they do her good plus entertain / knacker her out. So she will continue to have them!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I guess it would seem there's no clear or definite opinion on this and 'experts' can land on either side of the fence.

So far we've had no problem with frozen chicken wings and ribs and I've not read any horror stories from raw. I find it helps keep Monty regular and I'm always getting comments that his teeth are nice and clean, despite us never cleaning them ourselves.

I think I'll therefore continue but perhaps reduce it from daily to three times a week.

Monty seems to love them regardless of what the experts say and if it were up to him, he'd live on chicken wings!
 

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Graham doesn't have bones very often just because he is kibble fed and we don't tend to go to the butcher that often and I wouldn't go especially for him as the nearest is about 10 miles away!

We did get a bag full the last time we drove by, and Graham seemed to enjoy them but was never interested enough to finish them/didn't understand what he was meant to do so after a day sat in the garden untouched each one was eventually binned.

I think they do pose a risk in terms of swallowing fragments, choking etc but that's just like any other chew or even kibble.

I think the dental benefits or gnawing on a good bone is far more natural than having a dog put under GA to have it's teeth cleaned, or sticking your finger in their mouths with some foul tasting 'toothpaste!'.
 

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I think the dental benefits or gnawing on a good bone is far more natural than having a dog put under GA to have it's teeth cleaned, or sticking your finger in their mouths with some foul tasting 'toothpaste!'.
The late Wendy Boorer, who kept Affenpinschers, wrote a book some years ago, and in it she wrote that bones were very abrasive and wear the enamel on dogs teeth thus allowing decay to creep in.

John :)
 

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I think i'd rather take that risk than plaque and tooth decay arising as a result of bad dental health! Surely the scraping/sanding down that vets do to get rid of it would do more harm than a bone every now and then.
 

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These days many vets use ultrasonics to clean off the plaque, same as dentists, so no contact. I never clean my dog's teeth and have only had one dog with any problems in the last 60 years, and without giving bones. Back when I started in dogs dog tooth cleaning was just not considered necessary.

John :)
 

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I don't think it is either, our family dogs have never had teeth cleaned! The only issue we've ever had was with a 17 year old Jack Russell who had quite bad plaque build up but when they get older these things do tend to happen, he was too old for them to be cleaned but it never affected him nor his eating habits :)
 
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