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Our 20 week pup has been fed Lilys kitchen Chicken&salmon puppy food since we got him, without any problems. He is a typical hungry little lab and has been putting about a kilo a week on. The feeding chart for weight - age is saying to feed him less now that he is 20 wks & 16.6kilo.
Does anyone know the rational behind this?
He scoffs his meals within seconds despite using a ‘bumpy’ bowl and will happily chew just about anything he can grab whilst walking.
Obviously we can’t keep increasing the food amount indefinitely but to decrease it seems almost cruel !😱
 

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The feeding chart for weight - age is saying to feed him less now that he is 20 wks & 16.6kilo.
Does anyone know the rational behind this?
With a young puppy the food has two uses, firstly it provides fuel rather like petrol in a car. But secondly it also fuels growth. As puppies get older the growth rate gradually slows until finally finishing at a year or so old, so the need for food to fuel this growth is gradually reduces. The best thing I can say to you is to feed to the dog, not the food bag. All dogs are different in both size and metabolism. My old Beth was a ball of fire where Lucy, who I had at the same time was a very calm quiet dog. Beth, although the same weight, needed nearly twice as much food as Lucy. My Chloe, nearly 10kg lighter than my Amy needed nearly a third more food. At the very best, the feeding amounts on feed bags is only a very rough approximation.
 

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Your first link goes through to a website advertising Harringtons, and the second is to Royal Canin, so I'm not sure which one you're promoting. Of the both, I'd personally opt for Harringtons, since Royal Canin use a lot of fillers in their food, and a known carcinogen as an anti oxidant.
 

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Royal Canin use a lot of fillers in their food, and a known carcinogen as an anti oxidant.
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Which one? This is the first time I hear it ...It is very interesting. Is this indicated on the packaging?
 

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BHT (Butylated hydroxytoluene, also known as dibutylhydroxytoluene,) and BHA (Butylated hydroxyanisole) are anti oxidants used in animal feeds, to prevent meat going rancid. And both are believed to be carcinogenic. We went into this some time back but it's difficult sometimes to know if it's in there or not. The regulations state that if a manufacturer puts it in their food they must list it amongst the list of ingredients on the packaging. But the manufacturers buy their meat from the wholesaler and if the anti oxidants have already been added when they buy it then they do not need to list it because THEY did not put it in. So although a manufacturer does not list it does not necessarily mean it's not in there!


 

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But the manufacturers buy their meat from the wholesaler and if the anti oxidants have already been added when they buy it then they do not need to list it because THEY did not put it in.
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What can I say ... controversial, but nevertheless thanks for the information.
 

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They tell us that modern foods are tailormade for dogs. But I brought my first dog in 1955 and at that time, so soon after the war, everything was scarce. Dog food was almost non existent. He lived mainly on our leftovers, and to this day he is still the oldest dog I've ever owned. We used to get knuckle bones for him from the butcher, and sometimes there was quite a bit of meat on them so mum used to boil them with onions carrots and peas, and we had beef stew that day while Monty got the bones. This was him.

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I emailed RC some time ago now to clarify which anti oxidant they used, and they confirmed it was BHT.
 
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