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Hi all

I decided on the lab 2years ago and was set on getting a puppy but last year I was diagnosed with tinnitus (ringing in the ears) and I found out constant dog barking can make it worse/louder and I checked on several lab Facebook groups and found labs are not a Barky breed but that a lot who have tinnitus have labs and have helped them beat the depression that comes with Tinnitus and there's a huge suicide rate with those who suffer tinnitus and I myself have really struggled to live with the ringing but so many said there labs have helped them stay alive and are only here thanks to there labs.

So now I know labs are not a Barky breed and are easy to train them to not bark i know there still right for me.

But I'm conflicted on which route to go down and I'm not ready to get one just yet I'm looking about in a year or so ( I'm moving then it will take awhile to do the house up and get it dog safe)

I myself still prefer a puppy as there a blank canvas and he will get used to my routine and I can train him from day 1 to not be vocal ( if he was) ect but a few on Facebook have said go for a rescue as they can match you to a quiet lab but I'm unsure on a rescue dog as my mom rehomed a golden that was quiet as the foster home but once at mom's became very vocal so I just feel a puppy would be better?
 

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I have to say I would always prefer a puppy, but then, I work my dogs so find it better starting young. I can train a young pup and have it in the field working by 18 months. I can then have it working with me for probably another 9 years. Where if I adopted an adult, say 2 years old, it would take longer to train and would probably be 4 to 4.5 before ready and it's working life would probably be over in 4 to 5 years. You also have to think about why the dog is in rescue, It may be a beautiful dog who's owner has developed a medical problem and no longer able to look after it. On the other hand it may have belonged to somebody who never bothered with training so that it has developed into a complete hooligan which they cannot handle. If you go for a puppy then you have all the training to do, plus sleepless nights when it is a baby. Believe me, puppies can be really hard work. So there you are, the choice is yours.
 

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I have to say I would always prefer a puppy, but then, I work my dogs so find it better starting young. I can train a young pup and have it in the field working by 18 months. I can then have it working with me for probably another 9 years. Where if I adopted an adult, say 2 years old, it would take longer to train and would probably be 4 to 4.5 before ready and it's working life would probably be over in 4 to 5 years. You also have to think about why the dog is in rescue, It may be a beautiful dog who's owner has developed a medical problem and no longer able to look after it. On the other hand it may have belonged to somebody who never bothered with training so that it has developed into a complete hooligan which they cannot handle. If you go for a puppy then you have all the training to do, plus sleepless nights when it is a baby. Believe me, puppies can be really hard work. So there you are, the choice is yours.
Thank you John so much for your advice , this will be my first dog but I have been easier around dogs ( always from puppy's) and when I was in high school mom was a puppy walker for guide dogs and I always helped her so know first hand how much hard work puppies can be but they were always worth it in the end even when your pulling your hair out;)

I personally still feel a pup would be better for me and I can always find a pup whose mom and dad and any other dogs that live there are relatively quiet. And training I know will be key along with socializion and giving enough mental exercise and when old enough ,enough physical exercise too
 

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I would say definitely a puppy as well, you can get to know the characters of the parents and what they are like, which may help you decide. My girls are generally quiet, and if they do bark I tend to call them away from whatever it is they're barking at, either the window or out in the dog yard. Added to that you have some security in the knowledge that mum and dad have good health test results when you take the time to find a good breeder, they will plan the litter to give the best chance of happy, healthy pups that are good examples of the breed.
 

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Definitely a puppy and make 100% sure you know precisely the characteristics of the parents. The breeder of my dogs had a stud dog from Russia stay with her to cover one of her own dogs and making him available to others too. He barked constantly, initially put down to being in a new environment. He was mated to one of her own dogs and a puppy from that litter she kept. The puppy was the only dog of all the dogs she’d ever bred that barked constantly and owners of the other puppies from that litter also commented on their barking. The stud dog was sent home after a few weeks rather than the several months he was due to stay.

I’ve got an oldie that barks but my youngsters rarely do.
 
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Baymax, b.Nov2020
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Tinnitus and Lab owner here :) Welcome my friend!!!
I think that the exercise and outdoors you'll experience to raise your pup, the "distraction" of caring for these high energy minions will help you with your tinnitus.
Mine is now nesarly 5 months and have heard him bark only an handful of times. Once when he saw himself reflected in an house mirror, once when he heard a dog barking in a TV series episode and a couple when the neighbour's dog barks. Given that he's constantly chewing something (and the higher the value the stronger he chews) he can't bark much :)
So good luck.
PS I still would also keep my mind open to adopting a young adult of mild character if its owners could not keep him for any reason and would maybe ask to have him a few days on observation with me before committing.
 
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