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Twig is now 5 months old, and has list a lot of his teeth. We went through a short period of time where he seemed to settle a bit. No launching, lunging, biting and generally being a boisterous pup. He's now reverted back to being bitey and launching himself at us. He's being walked, getting rest, going out for poos & we play to stimulate his brain. Weve also noticed his coughs his boy bits popping out more often . Are we now in the adolescent stage? He seems to be pushing boundaries, could this be testosterone related? He was about to start intermediate training school but C19 has scuppered that. (n):cry::cry: any help, advice, or gin would be welcome.
 

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I dont do gin, but I do have some lovely single malt!

Yep, training is not a straight line graph, it goes through ups and downs. At 5 months old most of the teeth will have broken through the gums, but will be still growing and still pushing the gums out of the way, so the mouth will still be a bit tender. Things to chew on will help there. The occasional frozen carrot.

Also yes, he is reaching the adolescent stage. If you were around bitches a six month old dog would be capable of siring pups, so his thoughts are moving on to higher things. He is moving into the age when life is quite complicated for dogs, just as it is for children.

It's a shame his classes have finished, but it's understandable and nothing we can do to change it. But really, training is the answer. It really does not matter what you train, it's occupying the brain what counts, giving him something to think about. I always recommend gundog training, because Labradors are gundogs, but it could just as easily be Heelwork to music or agility, (Although agility can wind them up so needs careful handling) With gundog work, sitting and waiting to be sent for a retrieve puts a little discipline into the exercises, the sitting and staying being the most important bit with the retrieve being the reward for waiting. As I said, it's all about occupying his mind.
 

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I feel for you. My boy is 28 months, we restarted classes after a long Covid break only to have them stop again just as he was starting to show some maturity and begin to excel in training.

Look for brain training ideas online, there’s lots of them. Continue with basic training at home (sit, stay, down, heel work, recall), you could do sit, down or stand and get pup to stay while you walk around them (easier said than done). One of the first thing I do with my pups is to teach a touch command. So useful in a multitude of situations.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I dont do gin, but I do have some lovely single malt!

Yep, training is not a straight line graph, it goes through ups and downs. At 5 months old most of the teeth will have broken through the gums, but will be still growing and still pushing the gums out of the way, so the mouth will still be a bit tender. Things to chew on will help there. The occasional frozen carrot.

Also yes, he is reaching the adolescent stage. If you were around bitches a six month old dog would be capable of siring pups, so his thoughts are moving on to higher things. He is moving into the age when life is quite complicated for dogs, just as it is for children.

It's a shame his classes have finished, but it's understandable and nothing we can do to change it. But really, training is the answer. It really does not matter what you train, it's occupying the brain what counts, giving him something to think about. I always recommend gundog training, because Labradors are gundogs, but it could just as easily be Heelwork to music or agility, (Although agility can wind them up so needs careful handling) With gundog work, sitting and waiting to be sent for a retrieve puts a little discipline into the exercises, the sitting and staying being the most important bit with the retrieve being the reward for waiting. As I said, it's all about occupying his mind.
Thank you John, as always really useful advice & suggestions
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I feel for you. My boy is 28 months, we restarted classes after a long Covid break only to have them stop again just as he was starting to show some maturity and begin to excel in training.

Look for brain training ideas online, there’s lots of them. Continue with basic training at home (sit, stay, down, heel work, recall), you could do sit, down or stand and get pup to stay while you walk around them (easier said than done). One of the first thing I do with my pups is to teach a touch command. So useful in a multitude of situations.
Thank you so much. When he does do activity that makes him think he does seem to be more tired than normal.
We try and vary where we walk to ensure he has different things to sniff at. We will continue to ( try) to train him 🙄🤣🤣
 

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One thing I would say is DON’T rely on physical activity to tire him out. Mental stimulation can be just as good. The downside with physical activity is the more they get, the more they need. I vary...physical (walkies, retrieving, tracking, ring training), a ride out in the car (a half hour drive out to the shops whacks them right out...being alert in the car watching what’s going on around - I do have a lockable, crash tested crate in my car), brain games. I do varied things every day but one thing is an absolute must...an afternoon nap in their crates from around 3pm for a couple of hours. That’s a big bonus if they need to go to kennels or we need to leave them...they know if they’re in their boxes, it’s time to sleep.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
One thing I would say is DON’T rely on physical activity to tire him out. Mental stimulation can be just as good. The downside with physical activity is the more they get, the more they need. I vary...physical (walkies, retrieving, tracking, ring training), a ride out in the car (a half hour drive out to the shops whacks them right out...being alert in the car watching what’s going on around - I do have a lockable, crash tested crate in my car), brain games. I do varied things every day but one thing is an absolute must...an afternoon nap in their crates from around 3pm for a couple of hours. That’s a big bonus if they need to go to kennels or we need to leave them...they know if they’re in their boxes, it’s time to sleep.
Hi,

Yes someone else has said that to us re physical activity. Whilst it's required, other stimulation is a must!
 
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