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I did a quick search and couldn't find anything from the past 5-6 years !

We have our puppy coming in 3-4 weeks and we are busy reading this forum about all manner of things from brining him home, to food, too crate and toilet training him.

I would like to get comprehensive insurance for him and I was wondering which companies and plans are the ones most recommended by the owners on the forum?

Thanks you
 

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Oh dear! Insurance! OK, I'm not the best person to talk to about this. I date from the days before vet insurance existed and have never insured my dogs. (or for that matter anything other than my car and house.) I consider insurance is an expensive option. In the early days vet insurance was touted as a means of the poor being able to effectively spread the vet bill over a period of time. A great idea. But then the so called "Super Vets," realising that there was money to be made came up with more and more exotic treatments, in some cases surpassing even whats available for humans. Yes, these vets are exceedingly clever, but make no mistake, if the money was not there then they would never have bothered developing these techniques, techniques which have carried over into human treatment! So yes, it does have had it's good side. But what it has done is to price insurance out of the range of the very people it was designed to serve, because these techniques are exceedingly expensive. Vets have not been slow jumping in on the band waggon, the golden goose was there, ripe for plucking, and pluck it they have, to the extent they are killing the goose that laid the golden egg!

But then look at the insurance company. The premiums it collects have to pay the vet's bill, but thats not all. It also has to pay for the insurance companies office space, rates, lighting and heating, the staff salary bill, dividends to share holders, and at the end of the day, supply a profit!

From that you can see, the average pet owner is going to pay far more than they will ever get back. A better plan is to open a bank account and pay your premium into that, keeping it strictly for vet bills. OK, I've been around a long time and most problems my dogs get I can deal with myself without recourse to my vet. But many run to their vets for the least little thing thinking "I wont be paying this, my insurance will." But of course they will be paying it, and the insurance companies overheads in the premium. Think first, "If this happed to me, would I go to my doctor, treat it myself, or give it a little time to see if it clears up?" Dont take chances, but just be sensible.

So there you are. I did say at the start that I was not the best person to comment on this. ;)
 

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Insurance companies are businesses out to make their share owners a buck. Put the money aside every month. I have a credit card too expressly for big, unexpected vets bills.
 
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Oh dear! Insurance! OK, I'm not the best person to talk to about this. I date from the days before vet insurance existed and have never insured my dogs. (or for that matter anything other than my car and house.) I consider insurance is an expensive option. In the early days vet insurance was touted as a means of the poor being able to effectively spread the vet bill over a period of time. A great idea. But then the so called "Super Vets," realising that there was money to be made came up with more and more exotic treatments, in some cases surpassing even whats available for humans. Yes, these vets are exceedingly clever, but make no mistake, if the money was not there then they would never have bothered developing these techniques, techniques which have carried over into human treatment! So yes, it does have had it's good side. But what it has done is to price insurance out of the range of the very people it was designed to serve, because these techniques are exceedingly expensive. Vets have not been slow jumping in on the band waggon, the golden goose was there, ripe for plucking, and pluck it they have, to the extent they are killing the goose that laid the golden egg!

But then look at the insurance company. The premiums it collects have to pay the vet's bill, but thats not all. It also has to pay for the insurance companies office space, rates, lighting and heating, the staff salary bill, dividends to share holders, and at the end of the day, supply a profit!

From that you can see, the average pet owner is going to pay far more than they will ever get back. A better plan is to open a bank account and pay your premium into that, keeping it strictly for vet bills. OK, I've been around a long time and most problems my dogs get I can deal with myself without recourse to my vet. But many run to their vets for the least little thing thinking "I wont be paying this, my insurance will." But of course they will be paying it, and the insurance companies overheads in the premium. Think first, "If this happed to me, would I go to my doctor, treat it myself, or give it a little time to see if it clears up?" Dont take chances, but just be sensible.

So there you are. I did say at the start that I was not the best person to comment on this. ;)
Thanks for this. My sister had a dog who jumped a fence and fell on it's shoulder, hand to have multiple surgeries that would have cost her a fortune, so thats why I quite like the safety net of having insurance.

Money set aside tends to get spent in my house too :censored:
 

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Insurance companies are businesses out to make their share owners a buck. Put the money aside every month. I have a credit card too expressly for big, unexpected vets bills.
But you have to pay off said credit card if something did happen. My worry is £25 a month set aside is only £300 a year ! If something that required surgery did happen , that won't touch the sides unless 5+ years in.
 

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My worry is £25 a month set aside is only £300 a year ! If something that required surgery did happen , that won't touch the sides unless 5+ years in.
It's a choice we all have to make. As long as you are aware that over time Insurance WILL cost you more then thats your choice. Trouble is, once you have stepped onto the treadmill it's impossible to step off, because your "float" will never build up. Also changing to an insurance offering cheaper premiums is impossible because once a dog has had a problem it becomes a "Pre existing condition" so no other company will cover that in the future, so the companies know that they can increase the premiums and you have no choice but to pay up. The whole system is loaded against the dog owner.

PS. You will be lucky to find a company offering a premium of £25 per month which provides sensible cover. Agria lifetime cover is £43.23 for £6500 cover or £56.46 for £12500 cover.
 

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I’ve never had a bill I’ve felt I needed insurance to cover, I’m not rich. I’d still rather put money aside and have a credit card on standby than line the pockets of an insurance company. In that way I’m in control. Also I spent most of my life working in the insurance industry...say no more 😉

I’m lucky enough to live in a country where vets bills aren’t inflated because of pet insurance and where vets allow payment in installments.
 

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My old dog is uninsured and has had health issues since he was 3, he's 11.5 now. Any money pot I had saved was unfortunately spent long, long ago on his ongoing vet fees. For the last 3yrs I've worked extra evening jobs cleaning offices just to pay for his meds. He costs me, give or take, £300 per month. Would an insurance policy have worked out cheaper??? Who knows....
Needless to say the younger Lab does have a cheap lifetime policy and will stay on it until such time as I can put some money back in the kitty. He's with Pet Protect. It is cheap and you need to read the policy very thoroughly as they don't cover everything fully, ie. will only pay out £750 towards an MRI, but for me that's an acceptable risk.
 
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