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Hi Everyone

Our new family addition Murphy is now 11 weeks and this weekend will embark on his first trip outside the house on the lead

We understand that we have no control over any possible generic health issues when it comes to hips and elbow joints but want to ensure we do all we can to give him the best start, if we are right we understand the following guidelines for up to 12 months

For every month old he is he can have x 5 minutes x twice a day so at 3 months 2 x 15 minutes walk

No Stairs
No jumping in or out of cars /no high jumping at all (he does jump when playing or he occasionally jumps up our leg, is this ok ?

Is there anymore non negotiable rules for puppies in their growing development stage or advice when it comes to not over exercising or ensuring hips and elbows don’t get damaged

Thanks Mark
 

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If they have good joints, then there's little chance they will damage them, but yes, it's good to be cautious so that if there is a chance they could cause damage, then you are limiting that. They carry the majority of weight over the front end, so try to minimise the impact when they are jumping down or off things particularly, but yes, follow the exercise advice, but do let him play and enjoy him as a puppy.

Just a note, my now 13 1/2 year old girl Tau, was an absolute nightmare as a puppy. She used to run round the house like it was her own personal wall of death. I never thought in a million years she'd have good hips and elbows, so you could have knocked me down with a feather when she came back with 0/0 hips and elbows.
 

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We did as much research as we could both parents were 0 on elbows 3/3 and 3/4 on hips, good EBV and 5 generations also good, so we want ensure we don’t undo any hard work.

I understand what your saying you can only control them so much as pups he has his moments it’s like a switch turns into a maniac for 10 minutes Let’s of steam then back to being sweet and innocent 🙄

0/0 on hips and elbows is amazing you must have been so proud and happy, thank you for taking the time to reply
 

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There is so much you can do in the time you are out with your pup. It’s all about preparing him for the future. Initially it’s all about training and socialising, (Although socialising is a word which so often people misinterpret.) Socialising does NOT mean running up to every person and dog that you meet, expecting a fuss from the human or a game with the dog! Not all humans appreciate muddy paws and not all dogs want to play, in fact some will bite his nose off! Socialising means learning to meet and greet in a calm quiet manner, just as training means learning to walk nicely at heel, come when called, and sit quietly while you talk to people you meet. I never walk my pups to the park, the distance is too great to expect a pup to maintain concentration, so the heel suffers. I put them in the car and drive them to the park. That way I can do my heel training in little 10 or 20 second bursts, interspersed with little off lead runs, frequently calling pup back to heel, to be praised, receive a treat then released again or have the lead slipped on again for another 10 or 20 seconds of heel training. I also like to just sit on a seat in the park for a few minutes with my pup and let the world pass by. 1/ it teaches the pup patience, and 2/ it gives pup a little rest (And does not count as part of the 5 minutes. In fact any time that the pup is sitting or laying quietly does not count as part of the exercise time, so 15 minutes at 3 months old can easily take me half an hour!) Because my pups are destined to be working dogs socialising also means learning about all things they are likely to meet. Learning to leave sheep and cattle alone, learning to walk across foot bridges no wider than a scaffold board laid across a stream. Also of course learning to retrieve to hand. There is so much a young puppy needs to learn if he is going to grow into a well rounded adult, and the sooner you start the better. Make it fun and he will respond. The photo was Chloe's first run on the common.
 

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Invaluable advice as always John and very much appreciated... we have him booked in to a KC approved puppy class which will give us a strong foundation and we hope will help socialise with similar age dogs, we have already taken him to garden centres to get used to people and new noises he is only 11 weeks still

We are trying to calm him down as much as we can when he has that 10 minute nutty session but it’s difficult when it’s like he’s like a kid that’s been on chocolate or sugar😊

The picture is great John .. how old there?
 

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She was around 14 weeks there. At the time I'd just been diagnosed with prostate cancer, so sadly she rarely got to go out during her first year. But she gave me something else to think about, so was very good for me. But most of her basic training was done in the garden. Not ideal, but. . . . . . . . Below two vids, her learning steadiness and heelwork. And the third, a little older starting to learn to retrieve over a fence. All in the garden.



 
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