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Hi all, never had a dog before, my sister has had black labs for 17 years and provided some assistance, I know opinions differ, so I thought I would do a kind of checklist to see what more experience owners think and if generally I have it right? Any comments would be appreciated.

1) Carry puppy home in the car, in a small-is carry box, with a toy and a blanket with familiar smells. Cover carry box so he can only see out of the door and my 6 year old son can talk to him. Our journey is about an hour in total. Not sure if dog will need a toilet break? We will have a couple of chew toys for him.

2) Breeder will provide us with food for 2 weeks. He will eat and drink 4 times a day. I will keep buying the same brand and food as he is used to.

3) We have two crates, one for the house and one for the car. While he is not going to be traveling in the car my sister who has two black labs has suggested putting one in our bedroom and one in the lounge. He will be better behaved and feel more comfortable if he is around people, especially at first when he isn't used to being on his own. Is this right, or should we leave the puppy downstairs at night right from the start? Also a hot water bottle and ticking clock in the crate during the night.

4) Toilet training - Take puppy out into garden every hour, to do it's thing in the same spot in the garden, make a big fuss when he does it right. I plan to get up during the night about every 3 hours to take him outside for the first week and gradually reduce this.

5) Important to take the puppy out, either carrying or on a lead almost immediately to get him used to seeing things he has never seen before, but being mindful to stay away from other dogs you don't know and other dog mess. Don't go too far from home, just to familiarise the dog with the local surroundings. We do also have a big garden.

6) I have a 3 year old daughter and 6 year old son. Both very excited about puppy arriving but we are concerned about the puppy 'biting' them. I'm not bothered about my own hands and know it's natural and to be expected, but concerned for my kids, especially my daughter than she might get scared of the puppy. Any tips or does anyone use gloves that doesn't pierce the skin?

If dog does bite, yelp like like it's siblings would and turn your back on dog and walk away to suggest you aren't playing anymore.

7) Insurance - Expensive but will cover you if something bad happens. Some thing insurance is too expensive and should just put money aside each month for any vet bills.

8) We live in the country side village, plenty of dogs around and nice country walks right from our house. Important to socialise the dog with others pretty much as soon as possible.

9) We have a log dog trainer that will help us train the puppy initially and we can learn from her as well. Very reasonable rate.

10) Rule of thumb for walking - 5 mins for every month he has been alive, twice a day. So 8 weeks is 10 mins twice as day.

Anything else ?
 

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Hi all, never had a dog before, my sister has had black labs for 17 years and provided some assistance, I know opinions differ, so I thought I would do a kind of checklist to see what more experience owners think and if generally I have it right? Any comments would be appreciated.

1) Carry puppy home in the car, in a small-is carry box, with a toy and a blanket with familiar smells. Cover carry box so he can only see out of the door and my 6 year old son can talk to him. Our journey is about an hour in total. Not sure if dog will need a toilet break? We will have a couple of chew toys for him.

2) Breeder will provide us with food for 2 weeks. He will eat and drink 4 times a day. I will keep buying the same brand and food as he is used to.

3) We have two crates, one for the house and one for the car. While he is not going to be traveling in the car my sister who has two black labs has suggested putting one in our bedroom and one in the lounge. He will be better behaved and feel more comfortable if he is around people, especially at first when he isn't used to being on his own. Is this right, or should we leave the puppy downstairs at night right from the start? Also a hot water bottle and ticking clock in the crate during the night.

4) Toilet training - Take puppy out into garden every hour, to do it's thing in the same spot in the garden, make a big fuss when he does it right. I plan to get up during the night about every 3 hours to take him outside for the first week and gradually reduce this.

5) Important to take the puppy out, either carrying or on a lead almost immediately to get him used to seeing things he has never seen before, but being mindful to stay away from other dogs you don't know and other dog mess. Don't go too far from home, just to familiarise the dog with the local surroundings. We do also have a big garden.

6) I have a 3 year old daughter and 6 year old son. Both very excited about puppy arriving but we are concerned about the puppy 'biting' them. I'm not bothered about my own hands and know it's natural and to be expected, but concerned for my kids, especially my daughter than she might get scared of the puppy. Any tips or does anyone use gloves that doesn't pierce the skin?

If dog does bite, yelp like like it's siblings would and turn your back on dog and walk away to suggest you aren't playing anymore.

7) Insurance - Expensive but will cover you if something bad happens. Some thing insurance is too expensive and should just put money aside each month for any vet bills.

8) We live in the country side village, plenty of dogs around and nice country walks right from our house. Important to socialise the dog with others pretty much as soon as possible.

9) We have a log dog trainer that will help us train the puppy initially and we can learn from her as well. Very reasonable rate.

10) Rule of thumb for walking - 5 mins for every month he has been alive, twice a day. So 8 weeks is 10 mins twice as day.

Anything else ?
Hi Yorkshirelabpup, I'm also in Yorkshire, in fact I've lived in every riding.

1. An hour is fine without a break, your puppy will probably sleep.

2. I would say that depends on the brand, if it's something really diabolical like Bakers I might be tempted to switch, but if it's a good brand and suits your pup then I would stick with it.

3. What works for you is really the answer to this one, if the pup is struggling to settle on their own downstairs, you might be better having a crate upstairs. What I would say is do pop him in the car for short journeys so he does get used to it.

4. Rather than every hour, I would say after any 'event', so when he wakes up, outside, when he's eaten, outside, when he's just had a play, outside. Encourage him to have a wander and sniff, and when he pees/poops praise with the trigger word you're going to use later to tell him to go to the loo. I use 'busy', so that's a good busy, what a good busy with young pups, and then later, when they associate busy with toileting, I tell them to go for a busy, or does anyone need a busy before I close the door, most of that sentence they don't understand, but as they associate 'busy' with toileting, they oblige by going out and doing one.

5. I would say a no to that one, yes it is important to get a puppy used to every day things, but I wouldn't walk a puppy on a lead down the street where I live, because you just don't know who vaccinates their dogs, who doesn't, is the area one in danger of your puppy coming into contact with parvo etc. I do take pups out, but I tend to pop them in the car, and take them to a quiet place, if there's not a lot of dogs about then I pop them on the ground, if it's a popular dog walking area I don't, I just carry them. And then gradually once their vaccinations are done and I'm a bit more confident if they come across something nasty they are protected, I start taking them to busier places and let them get used to everyday sights and sounds. The important thing is not to ingrain at this age that it is ok for them to go up to everyone and every dog they meet, socialisation is getting them used to the world out there, but not implanting the idea they are allowed to embrace it all every time they go out.

6. Consistency is key, if your children are giddy around the puppy, this will likely result in the puppy getting giddy, and of course they don't have hands, they use their mouth. So teach the kids to keep calm around the puppy, and encourage calm play. To this day, my past pups remember my high pitched 'puppies, puppies, puppies' call from feeding time, and they go ballistic, so high pitched excited noises excite them, low calm helps to calm them down. Also, it's fine to say 'No', obviously a puppy doesn't understand the word, so if they persist I remember them and stop interacting, they soon work out what behaviour ends the fun.

7. I currently have 5 dogs so insurance is a no for me, but it did come in very handy when I started out in dog ownership, as one of mine needed extensive surgery, and this was all paid for by the insurance. However, if I totted up all the insurance payments I would have made over the years, I doubt if it would have been of benefit long term.

8. No, and I'll explain why. Yes it is important your dog is used to other dogs, but if you put the idea in their head that they get to meet every dog they see, then you will have a recall problem in a few months time. Introduce your puppy to dogs you know are calm and tolerant, but train your dog to look to you first. I have a 'go play' when I take their leads off, ie they're not allowed to just bolt off and do what they want, and if I see another dog I recall them back so they don't make their own decision to go and say hello. You won't know if that other dog isn't tolerant, or is perhaps recovering from an operation, etc.

9. Make sure any trainer you use doesn't punish your puppy, and by that I mean uses positive training methods. That doesn't mean you can't tell your puppy/dog off, but it means setting them up for success, rather than failure, and then punishing that failure. So, for example, if you are training a sit/stop and building up distance, if you know you can take one step away, and back, don't take ten steps away and then punish them for moving, build up success over time with more and more distance.

10. Spot on, and actually the person who coined that phrase will probably help with advice as well.

Just to add to that, and I'm not hugely experienced but I do like to watch and see what is going on with pups/dogs, the two things I see fail on a regular basis as pups grow up are recall and manners on lead. I see so many posts saying my puppy can do sit, stay, down, come, heel, roll over, paw, spin etc, etc, and a few months down the line they're asking for help about which harness or head collar to buy as their puppy has grown and is pulling. The other one is recall, pups want to come to you when they're young, but going back to socialisation, if you teach them early to meet and greet everyone, then that's what they will do when they gain in confidence.

I concentrate on three things with pups, recall, manners on lead, recall, sit/stop and recall, and guess which is the one that is the biggest fail.

Good luck with your pup, hope to see some photos.
 

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I agree with pretty much Tarimoor has said. I'll just add,

1/ Put a piece of polythene in the bottom of the car crate, then several layers of newspaper, then a piece of vetbed type fleece, just to soak up any "accidents" on the way home to protect your car seat.

2/ As to food, choose a decent quality food which you can obtain locally, and if different to your breeders food start mixing it with the food the breeder supplies. Example, for every handful you take out of the breeder's bag, replace it with a handful of the new food, mixed well in. That way everyday the percentage of old food reduces and new food increases so there is no sudden change.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I agree with pretty much Tarimoor has said. I'll just add,

1/ Put a piece of polythene in the bottom of the car crate, then several layers of newspaper, then a piece of vetbed type fleece, just to soak up any "accidents" on the way home to protect your car seat.

2/ As to food, choose a decent quality food which you can obtain locally, and if different to your breeders food start mixing it with the food the breeder supplies. Example, for every handful you take out of the breeder's bag, replace it with a handful of the new food, mixed well in. That way everyday the percentage of old food reduces and new food increases so there is no sudden change.
Great, thank you !
 

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Thank you very much, Tarimoor, very helpful. We are in North East Leeds and puppy is coming from the Dales !
One of my pups from my last litter went to Kent, and the litter before that to Germany. You'd be surprised how far potential puppy owners are willing to travel for a pup.
 

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Not as far as Tarimoor, but I'm Bucks and Amy came from Suffolk and Chloe from Norfolk.
 

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My last two pups were in carrier in the car (a cat type carrier/size is usually okay for a puppy) for over 8 hours (Geneva to the Spanish border) with just me driving. Only one did a pooh in the crate, 5 minutes from home 🤣🤣. I had one who “sang” for about the first 45 minutes, the other who “sang” for the entire journey. Make sure the breeder doesn’t feed puppy before you pick it up if you’re really worried. Newspaper is a good option, if you don’t have vet bed, a towel would be fine. One from Sussex to the Spanish border poohed spectacularly in the carrier within 5 minutes, then spent the rest of the 11 hour journey on my husbands knee.

For an hour journey, I’d not worry too much. Just keep things quiet and calm.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Oh, one more thing, should I move my nice brown leather chair from the downstairs lounge to an upstairs room where the dog is not allowed? I'm guessing it will be eaten if I don't?
 

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Oh, one more thing, should I move my nice brown leather chair from the downstairs lounge to an upstairs room where the dog is not allowed? I'm guessing it will be eaten if I don't?
It's more likely to become a very expensive dog bed. My lot are allowed up on furniture, obviously with a pup you don't want to encourage them to get up and (particularly) off chairs and sofas etc, also worth blocking off the stair case with a baby gate if you haven't already. I have a favourite spot on a sofa, and the girls (I've currently got 5 in total) arrange themselves accordingly, one of them prefers sitting upstairs on a chair.
 

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I’ve never had a dog eat furniture. Hog it, yes, eat it no. 🤣🤣🤣
 
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It's more likely to become a very expensive dog bed. My lot are allowed up on furniture, obviously with a pup you don't want to encourage them to get up and (particularly) off chairs and sofas etc, also worth blocking off the stair case with a baby gate if you haven't already. I have a favourite spot on a sofa, and the girls (I've currently got 5 in total) arrange themselves accordingly, one of them prefers sitting upstairs on a chair.
Yes we have two gates that will stop the puppy getting to the stairs and into the kids playroom, where there will be small toys we don't want puppy going near !

How often will the puppy sleep when he arrives.
 

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Yes we have two gates that will stop the puppy getting to the stairs and into the kids playroom, where there will be small toys we don't want puppy going near !

How often will the puppy sleep when he arrives.
They sleep a lot, more than you'd think, and the rest of the time is playing or eating interspersed with peeing and pooping. The last litter of pups I had 18 months ago now, there were 11, you can imagine the racket that lot made when they got going, and how much cleaning up it took. Even now my girls spend a lot of the day asleep, I work from home when I'm not out on site, and the girls just curl up and sleep for most of the day, either on the sofa, or as I posted a photo yesterday, on my bed (two of them are there now), it's the life of Riley for them!
 

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The problem arises when you have a young family, puppies find that exciting and want to join in with the play. Trouble is, they then get over tired, and just like over tired children they can get fractious. Dont allow this to happen. If need be pop pup in it's crate for an enforced rest. You will probably find pup will complain volubly to start with then fall asleep.
 

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Thinking of your comments about raising a large litter Tarimoor I can only imagine the work and patience that took!
 

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Thinking of your comments about raising a large litter Tarimoor I can only imagine the work and patience that took!
It is a lot of work, but it has it's moments. It is by far worse losing a pup, and, thank goodness I've not lost any of my girls, although they have had moments where they've needed help, but sadly some breeders do lose a bitch when deciding to have a litter, so it's never a decision I take lightly.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Max arrived on Saturday !

He's such a lovely little puppy. He arrived pretty much toilet trained, he's had two little wee accidents inside, but both human error not letting him out quick enough, but other than that all wee's and poo's are done in the garden, no particular spot.

He's sleeping through the night without any toilet issues. First night 11.30 to 5.30am and last night 11.45 to 6am.

No whining, no barking, no noises at all. This morning he was obviously holding his wee as when I opened the door he didn't quite make it to the grass and did it on the wooden decking.

He's eating well and drinking plenty of water. His routine seems to be pretty manic first thing in the morning, then about goes in shifts of 60-90 mins followed by the same amount of sleep.

Issues

He is chewing the sofa and trying to jump on it all the time. He also keeps going under the sofa and whinges as I think he finds it harder to get out.

He's a little bit bitey with my 2 year old daughter and 6 year old boy, but nothing out of the ordinary. My little girl is far more forgiving and patient with him even though it's her he targets the most.

Trying to teach the kids to be calm and less manic around him while result in him not thinking they are playing games, is tricky, but we'll get there.

He loves the garden. He can see / hear sheep, squirrels, big kites, goats and horses form the garden which he likes. Tricky stopping him eating grass, and old fruit from the trees - but he loves being outside.




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Sounds like you are getting on wonderfully well! You will find that a routine develops then like gets easier because you start to learn when you can relax and when you need to be aware.
He is chewing the sofa and trying to jump on it all the time. He also keeps going under the sofa and whinges as I think he finds it harder to get out.
You must decide the rules, whether you allow him on the sofa or not. Personally I do, but I'm on my own and if Chloe didn't use it then nobody would! But if you decide you dont want him on it then the easiest way is to make it difficult for him, put something on it so there is nowhere for him to get comfortable. OK, it makes the room look a bit of a jumble, but it's only until he gets the message so it's worth a jumble now to have what you want later. As to going under, block his access! I had to with Chloe, but they grow so fast that within a couple of weeks she was too big anyway so the problem was over. As to chewing, there are "Anti chew sprays" Bitter Apple and the like, but check on a piece out of sight first that there is no staining.
He's a little bit bitey with my 2 year old daughter and 6 year old boy, but nothing out of the ordinary. My little girl is far more forgiving and patient with him even though it's her he targets the most.
Sadly this is pretty much a Labrador thing. Maybe a puppy pen to limit his access to the children. (Particularly when he gets overtired and fractious?)
Trying to teach the kids to be calm and less manic around him while result in him not thinking they are playing games, is tricky, but we'll get there.
As above
He loves the garden. He can see / hear sheep, squirrels, big kites, goats and horses form the garden which he likes. Tricky stopping him eating grass, and old fruit from the trees - but he loves being outside.
Eating grass in it's self is harmless. Most dogs enjoy "Grazing" but a blade can get stuck in the throat and make them sick. So yes, discourage it, but dont worry over much. Old fallen fruit can be a problem, particularly in summer when the wasps are around. I had a lovely Victoria plum in the garden which my dogs loved!
 
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