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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

So as the title says this could be a particularly stupid question however I'm concerned about Lilly being cold, she hates the rain at the best of times but I don't particularly know how thick her coat should be. My friends Lab puppy Marleigh who is younger than Lilly appears to have a much thicker coat, she is a beautiful black lab and of course Lilly is yellow, not sure if black labs have thicker coats than yellows.

Also Lilly is 7 months old now, and using the measurements on the equafleece site and a measuring tape Lilly fits into their small Lab coat.

So my main question is how on earth do you tell if your lab is chilly or if they need an extra jumper/coat when it's especially chilly?

I don't like being cold and I'd hate for Lilly to be cold and me not know that she is cold!
 

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I asked something similar not too long ago! Got some helpful replies! Here's the link to that thread, which will probably answer some of your questions until someone comes along and answers them specifically for you:

http://www.labradorforums.co.uk/ftopic-114441-days0-orderasc-0.html

I hope the link works since I'm on my phone! The thread is called winter attire :)
 
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So my main question is how on earth do you tell if your lab is chilly or if they need an extra jumper/coat when it's especially chilly?
When any of my dogs are cold, they stand tucked up, look miserable and shiver. If they are chilly indoors they will sleep curled in a tight ball, or try to dig to get under any soft bedding....or sleep all piled on top of one another (obviously your girl won't have this option). You just KNOW they are cold, as they look and act it.

The other way to tell if they are regularly cold, is if they drop weight. Keeping warm burns up calories, so if you find you have to feed your dog more to keep it's weight right, then it could be getting chilly.

Generally though, Labs have been selectively bred to work outside in the worst of weathers and live outside in unheated kennels, so reality is most won't be cold when living in a house with central heating, or when they are outside, moving about. Well not unless they are ill, old, or perhaps just come from a much warmer climate and they haven't adjusted yet.
 

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Agreed it's pretty obvious when they're but that's very rare for a Lab, I've only seen Mac shiver when he's been swimming in freezing cold water during the winter. Even then a little run around and he's fine again.
Personally I find it more of a problem when they get too hot.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the replies,

We have been spending most of the day without the heating on and at last check it was 12.5c in here, Lilly is currently snuggled up on my legs >.< We have started letting her on the sofa so that if she is cold she can snuggle upto us, and our sofa has a blanket on too plus the leather. I just wasn't sure if her coat was all that thick as Marleigh's coat seems super thick, compared to Lilly's. I'll keep an eye on her and see how she goes. Thanks again!
 
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My Pickle only has a fine coat. It isn't much thicker than a Greyhound's, but she still doesn't get cold. On the other hand my Poodles really feel the cold, even if I leave their coats quite long (and it's so dense you can't get your fingers through it). So I think there's more to it than just fur and I think the amount of body fat they carry helps insulate them. Even the leanest Labs probably have more body fat than the average Poodle, as they are more like Greyhounds under all the fur.
 
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After Runy had her cancer op and had a massive bald patch she really felt cold. She curled in a ball, dug under sofs cushions, under my jumper, shivered, and generally looked cold and unhappy.. we ended up buying her a coat until her fur grew back.
 
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