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Hello,
So I own a black male 11 week old lab, he's adorable most of the time however these past few days he's REALLY changed. He bites, not nips, bites! So much so he draws blood :( every website says to give a yelp or "ouch" and if that doesn't work to leave the room. However if I yelp he bites harder and then growls. Its when I leave this is where it hurts cause he goes for my feet/legs/ankles. I've neen told he's "playing" but I've never known a puppy to be like this. I really need to stop this, as today he attempted to bite my face!
Im only concerned as his mother didn't exactly look after her pups as after 4-5 weeks or so she stopped caring for them. So im trying my best to teach him bite inhibition. He takes treats gently which is good.
One last mini issue, toilet training! He pees in his crate, as in he'll actually walk into his crate to wee. Is this normal? He loves his crate he'll walk in to sleep on his own yet sometimes he fools me and wees!
Im going to find a puppy class to help socialise him with dogs which I've been told will help with bite inhibition.
 

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They can be right odd balls and challenges these little lab crocs hey?!

Biting or mouthing is pups way of exploring the world and testing limits. Consistency is the key in showing him its unacceptable

On the peeing front we used positive reinforcement with Judy, praising her like mad when peeing in the garden of her own accord. This was coupled with closely watching her inside and almost developing a second sense as to when she was abouts to pee. We never scolded her for accidents but had her outside just before, during or after the act. She soon learnt to tap the back door or stand by it (even giving us a little yap if we didn't open the door promptly for her!!)
Again consistency the key but she did push my buttons for a while when she realised getting someone away from the footy on the tele was as easy as tapping on the door ever 2 minutes!! We had to follow it through and open it every time though or mixed messages would've gone out
She learnt fast and learnt good; star pupil I reckon

So if you're looking to buy a ready made effort off the shelf I'd pop down the shop for a bag of patience, a box of calmness and a lifetime supply of consistency!!!!

Good luck and I'm sure others will have better advice
The mantra is they are worth it
 

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Puppy biting is normal - but, of course you need to protect your hands! If you squeal loudly and walk away, all play stopped, he will learn to stop (but not immediately!) so have plenty of chews and toys at the ready to substitute for hands and furniture. We used to put toys next to the places Tatze tried to chew to head her off at the pass, it worked 99% of the time.

Lab pups are crazy crocs!!

enjoy your bundle of energy!

:)
 
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I've neen told he's "playing" but I've never known a puppy to be like this. I really need to stop this, as today he attempted to bite my face!
Yep he IS playing. I've had my face bitten a few times (my own stupid fault for having it too close to the Crocopup) and to look at my arms, I've looked like I've been self harming. Some pups are just worse for this than others. Often it's linked to how old they were when taken away from the litter; the older they are, the less likely they are to be so bitey.

The worst one I had was a pup who came to me at 6 weeks old. She was like an angry Tasmanian Devil for the first few weeks, but we got there in the end. Yelping never worked with her, so I used to hug her tight if she had got herself into a real state, until she had calmed right down. Most often she was at her worst when she was tired, so after a few seconds of wriggling like a stuck pig and trying to eat me alive, she'd fall asleep in my arms. Eventually, as she got all cross and bitey, she'd just take herself off to bed, but she was just so young when I got her, she needed someone to take control, before she could calm down.

He pees in his crate, as in he'll actually walk into his crate to wee. Is this normal?
It is pretty normal if the pup has had paper or puppy pads put in the crate to start with. Did you do that? Also if pups have been left in the crate for so long, they have no choice but to go in the crate, sometimes they will then just think this is the place to go.

If I were you, while he was out of his crate, I'd shut the door, so he can't go back in to pee. If you see him trying to get back in the crate, take him outside to toilet before allowing him back in the crate. If you haven't already, then make the crate smaller, so he can only just lie down flat, so if he does go to the toilet in there, he'd have to lay in it (most don't want to do this). Only have bedding in there, no paper or pads, as these only ever encourage the dog to toilet in the crate and wash that bedding and crate with Bio washing powder/liquid, as the non bio stuff doesn't get rid of the pee smells completely.
 

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All good advice above. But just so you know things do get better, my Amy was about as bad as it gets. And this is what she grew up into:-

Regards, John

 
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Awww Lovely Amy :love2:

Forgot to mention, my Tasmanian Devil pup grew up to be a wonderful working Guide Dog, so they do all grow out of this bitey phase. 8)
 

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There's a very old saying, which my old boss regularly used, which applies particularly well to Labradors. Cleaning it up slightly it goes like this:-

"When you are up to your backside in alligators, It's difficult to remember that the object of the exercise was to drain the swamp!"

Regards, John
 

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Milo was terrible for biting and my hands were a mess with those needle teeth but he is now 6 months and im fully healed.

I used to stop play if he got too much but mostly I switched to a toy as in phsyically putting the toy into his mouth to redirect him, Pull toys, Chew toys balls etc etc anything that was more fun than my hands/arms.

I found that standing up and turning my back on him when he bit used to stop him but at times it seemed like he would NEVER stop biting, When his puppy teeth dropped out the biting stopped too.

He will still start to bite when playing but it is more of a play mouthing but he still gets told to go fetch a toy which he does.
 

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I have to say the nice thing about Alfie (dog #2 in the house) is that George bore the brunt of him. :p

George, on the other hand, brought me to tears (and I'm a big bloke.) He's now a softie.

It does get better! It doesn't seem it now, but it does and treasure those puppy days - he'll be big before you know it.
 

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16 years ago, we had Cassie at 6 weeks and she was so little and cute and also was like a "flying gremlin" with teeth!!!! and, of course, she calmed down. Then we had her little sister, Sophie, when she was 17 months and I found myself protecting Cass from the new "flying gremlin"!!! :lol:

The nicest time I can remember was when Cassie was about two, we had a lot of pals round and I was cooking loads of cheese on toast cut into fingers :D I caught one pal putting a finger of cheese on toast halfway into his mouth and Cassie was taking her half so gently, without ever touching his lips :D but he didn't quite trust Sophie to do it!!!! :lol:

It does get better, promise :wink:


Chel and Dilys xxx
 

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I used to think it wouldn't get better but it does they just sometimes get too excited - I remember reading on here the 'croc' term and thought at least it's not just us which helped. Cooper is three now and we still have play fights with him but he knows now how far to go. :)
 

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I remember my friend, who is an experienced breeder or miniature shnauzers, calling round to see puppy Tatze. I said "don't let her bite your hands" as she put her hand in Tatze's mouth.

She said "Oh, I'm used to puppy teeth, I like them mouthing ...... OUCH!!" She soon stopped!

Lab teeth are not like other pups' teeth!

:)
 

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Just to add to what others have already said - it will stop.

I'd owned dogs all my life but posted on here feeling desperate in October when I got my new pup for exactly the same reason as you - she bit hard and drew blood every day! I agree that while some people find yelping helps, it didn't work for me - just made her more excited. As someone else has suggested, I just kept stuffing toys in her mouth.

In our case Molly stopped biting hard around 12 - 13 weeks of age. She's now 6 months and although sometimes grabs my hand, it no longer hurts (Partly because she has adult teeth and has learnt not to press too hard.)

I got Molly at 7 weeks old (I thought she was 8 weeks, long story...) whereas my last lab was 10 weeks when he left his mum, and not nearly so croc-y, so I think that may contribute.

Hang on in there!
 
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