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I noticed that Buster is limping. Brought him to the vet and did some tests on him. After a week, his results came out. The vet said that Buster has an ACL tear. Idk what to do! I also went here TPLO Surgery in Austin, TX | TPLO Austin for a 2nd advice. Same results :( They advised me that Buster should undergo TPLO Surgery.

Does anyone here have their lab undergo a TPLO Surgery? My baby is only 4 years old!
 

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Was weight a factor? Not sure why your thread is titled overweight Labrador otherwise?

As far as cruciate tears/ruptures go, they can do very well with repair or even just crate rest. My old girl, now gone sadly, had a cruciate rupture aged about 2 1/2, which required surgery and because the meniscus pad had folded over following the repair, she needed a second operation and it was a slow recovery over six months. She went on to live to 14 1/2 and was pretty fit most of her life, she suffered a partial tear to the cruciate on her other knee when she was about 9 years of age, which healed well with just rest and recuperation.

From my understanding cruciate problems come about from two main factors, either a sudden twist or turn, or incorrect angulation of the knee joint which leaves them prone to injury. It's also considered a bilateral condition, and certainly if it's due to incorrect angulation then the other knee joint will obviously be prone to the same injury. However, even if angulation is good, because of the tendency to favour the good leg, this puts a lot more strain on that knee joint, which can then cause a similar problem.

With careful weight management (I kept Indie nice and trim and kept her fitness levels up) and exercise, they can still lead a very full and active life. Indie didn't have TPLO, she had a lateral suture put in to stabilise the knee joint, but both surgeries have good success levels from what I understand.
 

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Cruciate Ligaments. Weight in it's self wont cause it, but can exacerbate the healing problems. Sudden turning, such as when chasing a bouncing ball is to often the cause of the ligament tearing, particularly if there is a weakness. A sloping Tibial Crest can provide the weakness by putting an abnormal load on the ligament. More contentious, some years ago I was reading an American working gundog site when a person mentioned the number of CL tears from dogs jumping fences shortly after the routine vaccinations. Dr Jean Dodds got involved, stating that it was known in humans that at least one human vaccine caused temporary loss of flexibility of ligaments, leaving them prone to tearing. There had been no studies done over this with canine vaccines, but that there was a possibility. OK, it's unproven, but I never do too much work with my dogs for a couple of weeks or so after vaccinations on the grounds of "Better safe than sorry!"

As to treatment, this depends on the severity of the tear. Total separation is an operation to re-join, there is no option. But a small tear will often repair it's self given time, but depending on how badly it's torn this can vary from complete cage rest just taking out to toilet in the garden on leash so the dog cannot rush about, to simply taking it a bit easy for a few weeks. Only a vet can advise on this after investigating just how bad the injury is. But as a warning, often when a CL goes there will be an ongoing weakness, with the possibility of it going again.
 
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