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Rang the vets last week about Murphy as he had been unwell for a few days, as they couldn’t see him they prescribed him antibiotics and steroids for his breathing. He didn’t get any better, and today we dropped him off, his hearts and lungs are clear, they say he is stressed with the heat. He has a lot of lumps and bumps but they don’t seem to be bothering him. He also has arthritis is in his hips and is now on anti Inflammatory tablets. They also classed him as obese and have put him on royal canine satiety food. I would just like your opinion on the food and what else I can do.
 

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He has a lot of lumps and bumps but they don’t seem to be bothering him.
As a 12 year old that's not unusual. They are usually fatty tissue, and tend not to be a problem unless they occur on a joint, where they can affect movement. Even cancer at that age is often slow to grow. My Amy first developed a cancer at 12, but it took until she died at 2 weeks short of 15 to really start to affect her.

They also classed him as obese and have put him on royal canine satiety food.
Which I bet they sell! Sorry, I don't like disagreeing with vets, but generally simply reducing slightly their normal food is enough to do the trick. You can add a little greens, cabbage and the like too it to bulk it up, so he thinks he's still getting a full meal, but in fact there is no food value foe a dog in the greens. ;) I have to say, it can make some dogs a little windy, but it's never affected mine. :) Labradors are inclined to middle age spread, and particularly if they are neutered. My Chloe was spayed in February this year at 5 years old, (I'm never in a hurry to neuter) and since then I've noticed her starting to get a little portly, so have reduced her food slightly, and with Murphy at 12 years old he has no doubt slowed down slightly, so is not burning up the calories to the extent he was in his younger days.
 

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As a 12 year old that's not unusual. They are usually fatty tissue, and tend not to be a problem unless they occur on a joint, where they can affect movement. Even cancer at that age is often slow to grow. My Amy first developed a cancer at 12, but it took until she died at 2 weeks short of 15 to really start to affect her.



Which I bet they sell! Sorry, I don't like disagreeing with vets, but generally simply reducing slightly their normal food is enough to do the trick. You can add a little greens, cabbage and the like too it to bulk it up, so he thinks he's still getting a full meal, but in fact there is no food value foe a dog in the greens. ;) I have to say, it can make some dogs a little windy, but it's never affected mine. :) Labradors are inclined to middle age spread, and particularly if they are neutered. My Chloe was spayed in February this year at 5 years old, (I'm never in a hurry to neuter) and since then I've noticed her starting to get a little portly, so have reduced her food slightly, and with Murphy at 12 years old he has no doubt slowed down slightly, so is not burning up the calories to the extent he was in his younger days.
Thank you very much for replying so quick.
 

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Cut food back, serve it swimming in water. I mean awash. He’ll need to drink in order to get the kibble which will make him feel full.
 
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