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Hi,
I am new to this site as I am trying to cover all possible options for my beloved pooch! Skye, is 5 years and 9 months old, fox red lab.
When she was a little younger, perhaps 2 or 3 she started limping on and off not constantly. She would still happily run around off the lead no limping at all until we got home, she’d had a rest (sleep) and then got up to walk, she’d limp. I took her to the vets & they said she had an ‘abnormal conformation’ meaning instead of her paws both being placed down straight, her front left law would go out to the left slightly meaning that when she was running off the lead it would strain the ligaments & tendons hence the limp after running around & not normal walks. The vet said to rest up (no walks) for 7 days then keep to lead walks and walk her up & down hills to strengthen the ligaments & tendons in this leg. I did this with her and it worked! She has had this sporadically since so I repeat the process and she’s fine. Until this time, she started limping again so took her back to this same vets and the vet I have to say was appalling! He said he couldn’t touch her leg because she was aggressive I promise you this dog is THE most gentle soft natured dog in the planet. Never got aggressive with any humans or dogs her whole life. Anyway he said he couldn’t touch her leg but diagnosed her with inflammation on the joints and prescribed anti inflammatory liquid. How can he diagnose it if he hasn’t even touched it or felt the movement in her leg?! He said can give it her with or without food yet on the box it clearly states MUST be given with food. He also said she was fat and I’m not blinded by love for my dog, she is most definitely not fat. I asked him what to do with her walks he said whatever, it doesn’t matter. So I questioned again if I can walk her as normal, off the lead, long walks etc and only then when I put emphasis on it did her backtrack and say keep to shorter lead walks. I mentioned her previous problem that a previous vet at this practise had diagnosed (the abnormal conformation) and he said no I don’t think it’s that. She is on her 5th day of 7 days on this ant inflammatory liquid and still limping a tad here and there so I am not confident this is a cure. I was thinking of looking into hydrotherapy for her, one of my sisters took her previous lab there and it worked wonders for him in his older years. I have lost all faith in vets recently due to a nightmare I had with my dogs intolerances and turns out I sorted her myself through a free test at crufts and now she is happiest ever with her food/skin! Anyway that’s a whole other story! If anyone can has had any similar experiences with limping/hydrotherapy etc I would really really appreciate advise! Thank you! X
 

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I presume we are talking about a front limp? Has the limp ever been exrayed, or has the vet diagnosed by feel and eye? I ask because the abnormal conformation "could" be a cause, or an effect. For example, she could stand like that because thats the most pain free way to stand because of some joint problem. The only way of starting to get an idea is to exray to see whats going on inside. But even that may not show the problem, which could be either the wrist, elbow or shoulder. These joints are notoriously difficult to actually see problems and a scan is better. But few vets have the equipment to do that.
 

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Hi, yes it is her front left leg. She has never had an X-ray only been diagnosed by look and feel. an X-ray would be a good idea, I am going to take her for a second opinion at another vets after this course of anti inflammatory liquid to see if they also suggest an X-ray. Thank you
 

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I would suggest a new vet #1 as this one is lacking more than a poor bedside manner. I would have x-rays done. Rudy had stiffness and occasional lameness in his right front leg when he was six. X-rays showed he had arthritic changes in his elbows bilaterally (not elbow dysplasia); he is a very front heavy dog. My vet felt it was likely due to quick starts and stops during retrieving rather than jumping up & down. He is managed quite well with Cartrophen injections every 4-6 weeks, a good joint supplement and the occasional Duramax and rest if he is particularly sore. He will be eleven next month. Good luck getting to the root cause of Skye’s lameness.
 

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I would suggest a new vet #1 as this one is lacking more than a poor bedside manner. I would have x-rays done. Rudy had stiffness and occasional lameness in his right front leg when he was six. X-rays showed he had arthritic changes in his elbows bilaterally (not elbow dysplasia); he is a very front heavy dog. My vet felt it was likely due to quick starts and stops during retrieving rather than jumping up & down. He is managed quite well with Cartrophen injections every 4-6 weeks, a good joint supplement and the occasional Duramax and rest if he is particularly sore. He will be eleven next month. Good luck getting to the root cause of Skye’s lameness.
Thanks very much for your input, it really is helpful to know and hear of others who are/have experienced the same and the causes and then things that have helped. She has now finished her course of anti inflammatory liquid and still no better so I am taking her back to the vets. A different vet for sure! Thanks again!
 
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