Labradors Forums banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Now that Bolli is "nearly" grown up we are thinking of getting another Girl. We took all the advice on here about not getting two Pups at the same time, but we would like to have another. I would like a rescue but OH says NO - He wants a Pup - So first question is there anything we need to look out for so Bolli doesn't feel anxious about a new Baby in the house. She is great with other dogs (if slightly over excitable - as we don't meet many here in the countryside!)
We are going to get her Spayed In January - should we wait until after that before getting a Newbie?

She is an incredibly loving dog and I just want to ensure that she doesn't feel displaced - so any advice from people who have done this would be hugely appreciated.

Many thanks
Denise & Mrs B
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,809 Posts
You will never know if she feels displaced until you do it. Some dogs won’t like the newcomer regardless so you have to make sure YOU want a new dog.

I’ve got 5, one is 15 months, 1 7 months. It’s hard work, boy, is it. But they get on brilliantly.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,519 Posts
Now that Bolli is "nearly" grown up we are thinking of getting another Girl. We took all the advice on here about not getting two Pups at the same time, but we would like to have another. I would like a rescue but OH says NO - He wants a Pup - So first question is there anything we need to look out for so Bolli doesn't feel anxious about a new Baby in the house. She is great with other dogs (if slightly over excitable - as we don't meet many here in the countryside!)
We are going to get her Spayed In January - should we wait until after that before getting a Newbie?

She is an incredibly loving dog and I just want to ensure that she doesn't feel displaced - so any advice from people who have done this would be hugely appreciated.

Many thanks
Denise & Mrs B
As Maddie says, you won't know until you do it, whether or not Bolli will feel like she's having to share you. In my experience, and I have six bitches currently, as long as you put the time in then they are fine, Labradors don't seem to mind sharing their owners as much as some breeds.

Just about the spaying bit, I would say if you can hold off until she's at least 18 months then I would, personally. There's a lot more evidence now that early spay/neuter, before they are fully physically mature can cause health issues. As they are still growing at 1 year of age, this could potentially cause problems with growth plate closure, and, in turn, cause problems with their joints. The advice is more and more towards allowing dogs to mature fully before spaying/neutering these days xx
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,590 Posts
In all the Labradors I've had I've only had 2 who did not take to the addition straight away. But in both cases after a couple of weeks all was fine. Labradors are a happy gregarious breed, they naturally like both people and other dogs. Particularly bringing a pup in you have a natural leader and follower.

John :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,519 Posts
In all the Labradors I've had I've only had 2 who did not take to the addition straight away. But in both cases after a couple of weeks all was fine. Labradors are a happy gregarious breed, they naturally like both people and other dogs. Particularly bringing a pup in you have a natural leader and follower.

John :)
It has amazed me how well Nettle, my foxhound, is with the pups. She is a natural nanny dog, I know they are sociable as a breed as well. Nettle plays with Branta and any of the pups that come back, she is a lovely character really.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,952 Posts
How I recognise this dilemma

Really wished we'd got Cooper years before we did.

I was always concerned how she'd react as she's such a boss lady and took a lot of my affection.
Our dog walker at the time said Jude would be fantastic as she's just that sort and how right she was.
My current paranois is Cooper annoying her too much but when you study them closely I'd say more often tha not it's Super Jude who initiates the rough play just to prove she'll still the guv'nar!!!

If you're ready then your whole house is ready.

Good luck
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks All for your advice - We will wait until next year and get over the Xmas festivities 1st then think about our Newbie. I know how much Bolli loves to be the centre of attention and she always will be - But we have enough room for two!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Hi Tarimoor - Thanks for the advice on Spaying - I understand that 18 months is recommended now - I will speak to our Vets and see what they think. I have to be honest I haven't noticed any growth in the last month which is a bit weird as she seemed to grow weekly! and her knobbly Growth plates seem to have disappeared.. Maybe she is almost there anyway?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,519 Posts
Hi Tarimoor - Thanks for the advice on Spaying - I understand that 18 months is recommended now - I will speak to our Vets and see what they think. I have to be honest I haven't noticed any growth in the last month which is a bit weird as she seemed to grow weekly! and her knobbly Growth plates seem to have disappeared.. Maybe she is almost there anyway?
It's growth plate closure that happens later as I understand it, which is triggered when they meet sexual maturity. It will depend on the individual dog how much you can physically see them grow, one of my now oldies seemed to be all legs until she was three years old, then she suddenly filled out.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,590 Posts
Long bone growth plates in Labradors tend to close at around 14 months, so 18 months is a safe margin. But there is really no rush, tackled with just a little thought seasons are no problem. These days I tend towards 5 years old.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thank you All
I am afraid I cannot wait 5 years!! Bolli was a complete Fruit Cake on her On-lead Street walks despite me hoping it would be good for her to spend more time on-lead. We still have the Complete Great Dane Next door... He is now nearly 2 and I just don't want the risk of him getting through our fencing - Which is secure for Bolli - But no idea if it would hold back a VERY LARGE Dane if he really wanted to get through. But we are limited as to what we can put up due to all the Trees/Bushes etc.

We also go abroad for a few weeks in Spring & Summer We have Bolli/House -
Sitters that will look after her - It isn't fair to expect others to have to deal with it. I will wait until the Vets think she is ready - But really appreciate your comments
Thanks Again
CHeers
Denise
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,519 Posts
I don't walk my in season girls, which solves that problem. They are used to being confined to the house and dog yard, which is not a bad thing, I've had to rest dogs due to injury before so they are fine, Rhuna is the worst for sulking if she can't go out.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,590 Posts
Something I wrote some time back.

The first thing to remember is that all bitches feel their seasons differently so making hard and fast rules of both identifying the start and the finish difficult, but saying that, there are plenty of little signs if you know what you are looking for.

Starting at the beginning, if you are around males at all, they can often tip you off up to 6 weeks before by increased interest. Not wild interest but a bit more sniffing of her than usual. I’ve had bitches who get very slap happy in their working on the run up to seasons, not really got their mind on working, but others would work right up to the day! (But by the same token I’ve had bitches who will start working happily the day the season finishes but others who always finish up with a broody 60 days!) You often find bitches will start urinating more just before or during the season, in effect they are scent marking, a sort of, “Hi boys, I’m here!) Add to those symptoms, the vulva swells, usually a few days before the season begins. (Although very occasionally not until the season actually starts.)

OK, I know all that sounds a bit vague, all maybe’s, occasionally’s and sometimes, but such is the nature of ladies! What I’m saying is, look out for the subtle differences, particularly from around 6 months on. As soon as I start to get the feeling that the season is imminent I start on the “Toilet tissue test.” When a bitch is in season she starts losing a bloody discharge from her vulva. In the initial stages there is not a lot of discharge, but when sleeping it collects inside, to drain out when she stands. So shortly after first standing after sleeping I give her vulva a wipe with a toilet tissue. This makes it so much easier to find. But remember, it does take a minute or so to drain out, so don’t be in too much of a hurry to wipe her.

The season it’s self lasts for approximately 21 days, although on rare occasions it can drag on for 28 days. The bloody discharge normally builds up during the first week, usually becoming paler and more watery during the second week and at this point the discharge may stop, or might continue for the entire time. But don’t be fooled! Even if it does stop she is still in season and is actually reaching her peak! In fact, if you were mating her then it is the 12th to 14th day when they are usually at their most receptive. Don’t be surprised if she is rather quiet during her season. It is not always the case but some can be very subdued. They often drink heavily. (Natural really when you remember they are losing body fluids.) They also tend towards rather more urinating. It’s all perfectly natural and nothing to worry about.

During the season it’s safer to not take her out, and certainly NEVER off lead. If I do take mine out during the early part of the season I put them in the car and drive a way down the road to break the scent trail back to the house. I walk them on lead around a local industrial estate where I know there will be no other dogs. But I never take them out during the second week to the end of the season. In fact many bitches really don’t want to do much during that time so it’s no great hardship.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,809 Posts
I never took mine out when they were in season, no biggie at all. I’m hoping Freddie will give an indication if my only entire girl is coming into season. He checks all his girls several times a day. Boys! She has a juvenile vulva at the moment, with no real sign of it emerging significantly so I think we’ll be safe for a while. The vet assurés me it will emerge when she comes into season.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tarimoor

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,519 Posts
I never took mine out when they were in season, no biggie at all. I’m hoping Freddie will give an indication if my only entire girl is coming into season. He checks all his girls several times a day. Boys! She has a juvenile vulva at the moment, with no real sign of it emerging significantly so I think we’ll be safe for a while. The vet assurés me it will emerge when she comes into season.
It's funny how people get squeamish talking about 'bits', a lot of people even squirm when I refer to the girls as bitches. But yep, the vulva can really swell, some more than others, Tau was like a baboon when she was in season.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,809 Posts
F2614866-5854-49FB-8F90-CA370594C3CD.jpg

Pops vulva is an innie rather than an outie. I’ve never seen it before, nor had one of my vets. The downside is multiple UTIs and real issues with toilet training. It’s much better now but still not an outie. Thankfully I have Freddie to help keep it meticulously clean. It’s like a little button, sometime barely visible. Here it’s about as visible as it gets.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,809 Posts
That is odd, I've never seen anything like that before either!
Apparently, it’s more common than we realise. It’s the first time I’ve actually heard a vet advising not to spay!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,590 Posts
It's not common, but not that uncommon. Usually it pops out during the first season, and then stays out. :)

It's always best to use the correct name for parts particularly when talking about medical matters, because it eliminates possible confusion. I remember at school, in the very first engineering lesson, our teacher said, "Right, we will get all the sniggering out of the way on this first lesson. This is a ******* file," (A ******* file is the correct name for a particularly rough file,) "And this is a ball joint." I've always remembered that lesson and since then have always endeavoured to use correct names. :)
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top