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After waiting so long and getting a puppy from a reputable breeder, she just informed me that her VET advised that my puppy has an overbite. The puppy is the biggest within its litter, strongly built but had this fault in the jaw.

She is saying that that should not be a problem and asking if I still need to get the puppy?

Any experience with this issue?

What are the disadvantages?

Would the jaw rectify itself in the coming few weeks knowing that my puppy is just 6 weeks now?

Would the overbite be more pronounced in the future?


Thanks,
Mo
 

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My friends have a puppy with an overbite. He's lovely, no problems with his temprament at all - he's a lab through and though! He looks a bit goofy if you pull his top lip back but apart from that you wouldn't know. He pushes into his food bowl more to get the kibble because he's obviously not got the easiest time of it to hoover food up but it's caused him no problems. I asked on here if it would cause problems but the consensus was that he'd not be able to be used for breeding. Will find the thread for you...
 

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Hello Mo,

I've seen many overbites in my time, some really extreme. Yes, maybe in the wild it might cause a problem with catching and killing dinner, but with a domestic dog it will not be likely to evercause a problem.

But saying that, I presume that by overbite you lean that it is the top jaw sailing too far over the lower? In fact most vets are not breed specialists so do not always have experience in how a Labrador puppy develops as it grows. In fact head shape changes quite a bit during the first year, so what appears incorrect at a young age can often come right later.

Regards, John
 
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My Mojo has and undershot jaw (bottom jaw shorter than the top) and it causes her no problems at all. It was more pronounced when she was really tiny but as her jaws grew it became less so.

The vet did tell me she may have to have her adult canine teeth removed because they may grow into her gums but this never happened and no one would really notice her goofiness unless they opened her mouth to have a look.

Obviously if you are intend Showing the pup, then this is a fault...but if not, then it's not anything to worry about. :wink:
 

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Jules' post has just reminded me - Dexter's adult canines didn't grow in directly above the puppy ones because his upper jaw is long. They grew in slightly in front of the baby ones, which now means he's got to to to the vet to have them out.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the responses.

I can see here one major limitation for me besides the dental issues/Show limitations. Is it true that this male would not be good for breeding?

I surfed the web and caught info that overbites are hereditary traits and can pass on to the next litters!

Does that seem right?

Mo
 

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i think overbite can be a bit or a lot...
you could also go to the dog dentist, like we do for the children.
if you wanna buy him as a stud dog.
it is true, he hardly will be used...
but as a family dog...
the other one with the correct bite can have a bad hip.

so if you like the pup, may be the breeder sell him cheeper, and you put that money into a dentist....
if it disturbs you or the dog...
lg evelyn
 

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I would imagine its possible the overbite is a heriditary thing, in which no, it wouldn`t be advisable to use him for breeding as it could be passed on, but you would also need to do all the other health checks prior to considering breeding with him anyway.
 
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Mohammed said:
I can see here one major limitation for me besides the dental issues/Show limitations. Is it true that this male would not be good for breeding?
There is always the possibility that the problem could be hereditary, so it should not be used for breeding.

However if you are thinking of buying a dog purely to use at stud, you may find these threads interesting.......

http://www.labradorforums.co.uk/ftopict-54217.html

http://www.labradorforums.co.uk/ftopict-29299.html
 

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Hello Mo,

I've seen many overbites in my time, some really extreme. Yes, maybe in the wild it might cause a problem with catching and killing dinner, but with a domestic dog it will not be likely to evercause a problem.

But saying that, I presume that by overbite you lean that it is the top jaw sailing too far over the lower? In fact most vets are not breed specialists so do not always have experience in how a Labrador puppy develops as it grows. In fact head shape changes quite a bit during the first year, so what appears incorrect at a young age can often come right later.

Regards, John
 

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Hello John, I was interested in your reply. My daughter has a 4 month old Labrador who has an overbite. The breeder did make us aware of this when she bought him and said he’d be fine unless we wanted to show or breed him, which we don’t. Our vet however is really pushing dental corrective treatment costing in excess of £2000 - not covered by insurance as it’s a genetic fault. He is a happy healthy pup and to put him through this with no guarantee it will work seems to me wrong. She says his teeth are already cutting in to his gums but we see no sign of this - my daughter is distraught, doesn’t have this kind of money and not sure what to do. What would you advise?
 

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Sorry Buddy Mac, but I have to ask "Why?" Dogs dont have to catch and kill their food these days. An overbite is rarely a problem. The only teeth which might catch the gum are the canines, and if this did happen then the simple (and relatively cheap option would be to extract the canines. The function of the canine teeth was to aid in the tearing apart of the meat of the animal it had caught for dinner. But with the domestic dog it's unusual for people to feed whole animals so really this does not apply. I'm sorry, I dont like criticising vets and obviously I cant see the extent of the problem, but I have to say, it really sounds like your vet is more concerned with making money!
 

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Thank you John I appreciate your honesty - I to, don’t like to criticise someone who has trained for years in vetinary medicine But I am interested in others who have experienced this particular issue and on balance people like yourself are saying leave well alone the pup is happy healthy, will not be used for breeding or showing he’s just a gorgeous family pet! Watch this space 🙂
 
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