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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Jagger is now 10 months old, walking with him on lead is becoming a massive chore, he constantly pulls!!! I have tried so many things he is currently using a double clip front and back harness which as helped a bit but he is still pulling. I have also tried stopping and walking in the opposite direction when he pulls but he still continues. Any help would be appreciated.
 

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Jagger is now 10 months old, walking with him on lead is becoming a massive chore, he constantly pulls!!! I have tried so many things he is currently using a double clip front and back harness which as helped a bit but he is still pulling. I have also tried stopping and walking in the opposite direction when he pulls but he still continues. Any help would be appreciated.
I feel ill equipped to answer this Scarlet as I have similar struggles with Jas, also 10 months.
I have read extensively on the forum about heel/lead training and like you have tried lots of different things, and maybe.......that's the problem? Other more experienced lab owners would probably say:
Be consistent
Use an ordinary collar and lead or a slip lead ( but make sure you know how to use it safely)
Stay calm and ensure that you are the focus of your dogs attention on walks
Be prepared to stop often.
Build 'waiting' into walks and reward for calm behaviour
Vary the route

When I feel that Jas will never learn to consistently walk nicely to heel I remind myself that, yes, she's still a pup and life is an exciting adventure. Also that she definitely does better on days that I feel positive about her training and ensure that I am consistent in how I behave and what I expect of her.
Best wishes
 

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Firstly, get rid of the harness. They just encourage pulling and you’re on the end of a harness attached to the strongest part of their body.

Mrs H A has hit the nail on the head, practice, consistency, don’t be afraid to go back to basics. I favour a slip lead with a double stop, one to prevent it coming too loose and one to prevent strangulation.
 
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Baymax, b.Nov2020
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I am losing so far against Baymax crazy behaviour in the first couple of minutes of the walk so here only to express solidarity :)

I did try using the retriever collar for the first 6-7 months but all I got was a coughing dog.

The most annoying behaviour he has right now is the "tug of war" routing in the first couple of minutes, meaning he takes the lead in his mouth and pulls backwards ike a locomotive. If you think a Lab is powerful when he pulls forwards have you ever tried a Lab in reverse? :)

When he wants to pull leading he grabs the leash in his mouth and off he goes, but he's a little more responsive to my voice and gait.

Had many dogs and this is the first one behaving like this and so far I'm not having much of a success.

Mr H.A tips are very wise but most don't work for me.

When we go out to walk not even food will change his focus from "I wanna reach the park and run free" and I cannot change the route to his walk.

Good luck my friend :)
 

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If the slip lead is in the right position you won’t have e a choking dog. In training it should be up high, just behind the ears. You have far more control that way and if the lead does tighten there’s less likelihood of choking.
 

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Baymax, b.Nov2020
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Thank @Maddie but he didn't choke because the the noose tightening, he did so simply by exerting an excessive pull on the leash with the from part of the noose pushing on his windpipe.
 

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This is it, if it’s correctly positioned, there is little pressure on the windpipe. I have a 42k puller that has pulled so much that I’ve ended up in hospital with torn muscles in my arm, I understand. You probably had the noose too low on the neck. It needs to be up behind the jaw at the very top of the neck (right behind the ears). This is what my trainer taught me, now Freddie walks quite nicely.

The correct placement of a sliplead
Working animal Dog breed Plant Liver Fawn
 

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My best boy ever, Jordi, gone 😪. Ace, 11 year old black Labrador and Bailey 19 month yellow Labrador
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This is it, if it’s correctly positioned, there is little pressure on the windpipe. I have a 42k puller that has pulled so much that I’ve ended up in hospital with torn muscles in my arm, I understand. You probably had the noose too low on the neck. It needs to be up behind the jaw at the very top of the neck (right behind the ears). This is what my trainer taught me, now Freddie walks quite nicely.

The correct placement of a sliplead
View attachment 26944
Wow, thanks Maddie, I’ve obviously had the positioning incorrectly on Bailey’s slip lead. He pulls like crazy so I’ll try this later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So I brought a cheap flat collar today and tried Jagger on it, only walked around the block. But he honestly walked like a dream no pulling walked nicely beside me!! The harness is definitely going in the bin 😂. I want to get him a really good quality collar if anyone has any good suggestions on where to buy one that would be great! And thank you everyone who said go back to basics I would be lost without this forum thank you again 😊😊
 

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At 10 months old he will be pretty much full size by now so it's worth getting a decent collar. But he is still likely to put on a little more body yet, so I'd get one with a little more growing room in it. Red Dingo collars seem popular
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
At 10 months old he will be pretty much full size by now so it's worth getting a decent collar. But he is still likely to put on a little more body yet, so I'd get one with a little more growing room in it. Red Dingo collars seem popular
Thanks John I will take a look
 

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To be honest, it's nothing to do with the equipment as such, it's to do with the handler's ability, or lack of it. I use slip leads as they are convenient and easy to use, but there's no magic cure to pulling, it's just lots of training and as before, the experience of the handler.

For my birthday I was recently treated to a training session with someone who trains and works dogs for a living, a well known name in Labradors and huge amounts of experience. I've only really done some basics with Branta, her desire to retrieve is pretty good, so we don't do much of that, and I've tried to concentrate on her recently getting her steady so she dosn't assume every retrieve is hers. The training session consisted of myself, and one of my puppy owners from a previous litter, both taking it in turns to walk with our dogs at heel technically off lead (very short, light training lead on) and asking for a sit whenever they weren't at heel. The theory is, instead of telling your dog off or 'No', apply the brakes (sit) and start again. It all went very well until I couldn't quite get what I was being asked to do, so the trainer took Branta's lead off me to show me, and the first words out of their mouth were 'what a mummy's girl she is', and yes, she is a real wuss and a mummy's girl. However, the trainer took Branta off down the track with her perfectly at heel, sitting when asked, and not diving to get back to me at the end. It's all down to the experience and handling ability of that trainer that they are able to do that, which is why it's always worth going to a good trainer, who will not train your dog, but will train you to train your dog. Branta was sitting pretty steady by the end, walking away from a seen retrieve, at heel for a good distance, to make it a memory retrieve, so I reckon the trainer did a good job training me!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
To be honest, it's nothing to do with the equipment as such, it's to do with the handler's ability, or lack of it. I use slip leads as they are convenient and easy to use, but there's no magic cure to pulling, it's just lots of training and as before, the experience of the handler.

For my birthday I was recently treated to a training session with someone who trains and works dogs for a living, a well known name in Labradors and huge amounts of experience. I've only really done some basics with Branta, her desire to retrieve is pretty good, so we don't do much of that, and I've tried to concentrate on her recently getting her steady so she dosn't assume every retrieve is hers. The training session consisted of myself, and one of my puppy owners from a previous litter, both taking it in turns to walk with our dogs at heel technically off lead (very short, light training lead on) and asking for a sit whenever they weren't at heel. The theory is, instead of telling your dog off or 'No', apply the brakes (sit) and start again. It all went very well until I couldn't quite get what I was being asked to do, so the trainer took Branta's lead off me to show me, and the first words out of their mouth were 'what a mummy's girl she is', and yes, she is a real wuss and a mummy's girl. However, the trainer took Branta off down the track with her perfectly at heel, sitting when asked, and not diving to get back to me at the end. It's all down to the experience and handling ability of that trainer that they are able to do that, which is why it's always worth going to a good trainer, who will not train your dog, but will train you to train your dog. Branta was sitting pretty steady by the end, walking away from a seen retrieve, at heel for a good distance, to make it a memory retrieve, so I reckon the trainer did a good job training me!
You are exactly right! Jagger is doing really well on the days I am focused and feel like I am in control. Other days are not so great but I have come to realise it is more about me than him, off lead he walks perfectly to heel but on lead I think I am the the problem expecting him to pull so therfore that is what he does, we will get there like you say it is lots of training and patience, everything is fine when it is just us but as soon as he sees another person or
dog that's when it starts again that is probably down to me! I become more tense and in effect makes Jagger tense if that makes sense.
 

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You are exactly right! Jagger is doing really well on the days I am focused and feel like I am in control. Other days are not so great but I have come to realise it is more about me than him, off lead he walks perfectly to heel but on lead I think I am the the problem expecting him to pull so therfore that is what he does, we will get there like you say it is lots of training and patience, everything is fine when it is just us but as soon as he sees another person or
dog that's when it starts again that is probably down to me! I become more tense and in effect makes Jagger tense if that makes sense.
Branta has such focus on tennis balls/dummies I can easily get her attention, but that is one thing I have worked on, ie to get that focus. Because the reward is a retrieve, it's becoming easier to get her to understand that I want her to sit steady rather than run in every time, the key is training with another person who can pick the dummy up if she does run in, and that then removes the self rewarding. The same sort of training can be applied to when they see another dog, if they pull, go the other way, if they walk nicely and sit when asked then they eventually get a play date. Change directions with him so you're not walking in a straight line, get a friend with their dog to help out (a calm dog if possible) and if he does as you ask, reward with a bit of an off lead play.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Jagger loves tennis balls but never thought of using them when on lead I am going to try and work on his focus with tennis balls maybe that will help, he is absoulety perfect in every other way if I can master the lead work then I will have the perfect best friend 😊 thank you for the advice it is very much appreciated. I am sure I will need more along the way.
 

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Just thought I'd share this picture of Branta with her heelwork training lead on. I had a really interesting training session recently, where instead of getting my grumbly voice out when Branta pulled, I sat her. The thinking behind doing this is that the sit is your brakes, so if she starts getting away from me, instead of saying 'no', ask her to sit, ie apply the brakes, get her attention and then onto heelwork again. The heelwork leads allows you to have them technically offlead, but if they start to go you've still got something to grab hold of.

Dog Plant Working animal Carnivore Sunlight
 

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I start heel training with a very young pup off lead, but thats only a few paces. When I start with a lead I use the lightest collar and a piece of string as a lead. Ideally I dont even want my pup to realise she's actually on a lead. All this is in the garden before my pup can even go out of the gate.

Below is Chloe on early heel training in the garden. She has progressed to a slip lead by this time. Amy was still around at that time and joined in.

Chloe heel 1 - YouTube

The second vid is again Chloe, but progressed to heel on the pavement.

Chloe Heel - YouTube
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Just thought I'd share this picture of Branta with her heelwork training lead on. I had a really interesting training session recently, where instead of getting my grumbly voice out when Branta pulled, I sat her. The thinking behind doing this is that the sit is your brakes, so if she starts getting away from me, instead of saying 'no', ask her to sit, ie apply the brakes, get her attention and then onto heelwork again. The heelwork leads allows you to have them technically offlead, but if they start to go you've still got something to grab hold of.

View attachment 26957
Branta is a beautiful girl ❤ I have been doing the stop and sit when jagger pulls and it is working!! Thank you, very much apperiated x
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I start heel training with a very young pup off lead, but thats only a few paces. When I start with a lead I use the lightest collar and a piece of string as a lead. Ideally I dont even want my pup to realise she's actually on a lead. All this is in the garden before my pup can even go out of the gate.

Below is Chloe on early heel training in the garden. She has progressed to a slip lead by this time. Amy was still around at that time and joined in.

Chloe heel 1 - YouTube

The second vid is again Chloe, but progressed to heel on the pavement.

Chloe Heel - YouTube

Amazing heel work, hopefully one day I will get to this stage, just wish I had worked on it a lot sooner as Jagger is so strong now but we are making progress in the right direction thankful :)
 
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