Labradors Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Many people will know that James Hindley of Cornlands died aged only 46 after a very sudden and short illness in 2018. He and Peggy Rae lived for their Labradors, and I was the unseen partner of James and the unseen third person since the nineties. James and I lived together for 22 years and I decided early in my bereavement to continue Cornlands as a legacy to both James and Peggy. I am still looking after our dogs at Cornlands and the campaign by the executors and their hangers on has failed. We were needlessly stll in probate when James died in 2018.

I shall Continue with Cornlanlds Labradors as a legacy to both James and Peggy. James should not have left us so young. I know the breed well and both ackowledged my ability as a farmer's son and stockman's grandson to understand the essentials of this special breed. It will launch when legal procedings are fnalised and be a Not for Profit legacy venture.

It is an honour to have spent my 22 years with James, and I have until now kept in the background. Cornlands is an historic breed of dual purpose black and yellows. After over seventy years of breding, it would be sinful not to allow the continuation of this loved strain of dogs. I am Angus McGregor and my professional angle is through genetics as a cognitive neuropsychology graduate. I would like to research the age related issues of our dear mascots as an analogy of age related degeneration in their adoptive parents; us. I shall edit the Cornlands Labradors website in due course and the original email addresses will be checked. Thanks for reading, Angus McGregor
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,534 Posts
Many people will know that James Hindley of Cornlands died aged only 46 after a very sudden and short illness in 2018. He and Peggy Rae lived for their Labradors, and I was the unseen partner of James and the unseen third person since the nineties. James and I lived together for 22 years and I decided early in my bereavement to continue Cornlands as a legacy to both James and Peggy. I am still looking after our dogs at Cornlands and the campaign by the executors and their hangers on has failed. We were needlessly stll in probate when James died in 2018.

I shall Continue with Cornlanlds Labradors as a legacy to both James and Peggy. James should not have left us so young. I know the breed well and both ackowledged my ability as a farmer's son and stockman's grandson to understand the essentials of this special breed. It will launch when legal procedings are fnalised and be a Not for Profit legacy venture.

It is an honour to have spent my 22 years with James, and I have until now kept in the background. Cornlands is an historic breed of dual purpose black and yellows. After over seventy years of breding, it would be sinful not to allow the continuation of this loved strain of dogs. I am Angus McGregor and my professional angle is through genetics as a cognitive neuropsychology graduate. I would like to research the age related issues of our dear mascots as an analogy of age related degeneration in their adoptive parents; us. I shall edit the Cornlands Labradors website in due course and the original email addresses will be checked. Thanks for reading, Angus McGregor
I'm sorry that you've joined this forum under such sad circumstances, but what a lovely legacy you will hopefully make.

And I will be interested to see how you continue on, as I am very much a fan of Labradors that are good examples of not only how they appear, but that can also perform the function they were bred for. Welcome to the forum.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,633 Posts
Thank you for posting. I started in Labradors in 1972, after dabbling in various other breeds. I'm not really into showing, being more involved in the working side but I've sat beside the ring so many times watching the judging, so have seen so many Cornlands dogs in that time. I do love good looking Labradors who can work, and think it important that the working instinct is kept strong in the breed.

Probate can be very time consuming, even in straight forward cases. I've been through it twice, once when my father died, then again when my mother died. Both took quite a few months, even though the wills were very straightforward.

Sadly my time in dogs is fast drawing to a close, time marches on remorselessly. But I can look back on the past and think, "That was fun!" and that is the most important thing.

Regards, John
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,813 Posts
Welcome to the forum and, as others have said, sorry it’s in sad circumstances. I’m always interested to see breeders that work and show their dogs. In France where I am, it’s more common to do that, in fact you can’t get any title without actually taking part in trials.

All the best to you.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top