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THANK YOU FOR PUTTING THIS ON - I WAS BEGINNING TO THINK OUR 1 YEAR OLD BOY COOPER WAS JUST BEING BAD AS WE HAD ANOTHER LAB WHEN I WAS GROWING UP AND SHE NEVER BITE ONCE, WHERE AS COOPER WILL HAVE A NIBLE/BITE AS OFTEN AS POSSIBLE

THANKS AGAIN
 

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It's great to hear this biting is all normal for lab pups. Our boy is 14 weeks and has broken skin and really hurts when he bites. I was starting to think he had anger issues. I researched lab dogs but never focused on the pup stage. Besides doing everything recommended...ie yelp and give a toy, tap snout etc what is the best way to discourage him from biting us? We do have kids as well and now that hes been with us almost two month they are becoming familiar with his ways ..at first they all hid from him. He is 3 1/2 months. Thanks for any advice.
 

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Different things seem to work for different puppies, but one thing that will probably not make any difference is tapping him on the nose. What you could try when he bites is yelp, fold your arms, turn around and ignore. If you are sitting, stand up. If he is biting ankles walk away. It does get better, so persevere :)
 

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Try this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vrPDMc-I-k&list=PLE69C623A53AFE753&index=29&feature=plpp_video

Also long trousers and long t-shirts to avoid damage and don't put your face at puppy height. Get a baby gate on your main room and keep toys in every room, any nipping at you gets a 'no' then give him/her the toy, if he/she continues leave via baby gate pup can still see you but can't get to you, a couple of mins later go back play together with the toy, pup will soon learn that to get your attention they need to not nip and that any nipping will result in being left and the game ending.
 

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Great Information On Labrador Biting -- And How To Stop It!

Jules,

Great info. I find that a lot of Labrador owners don't realize that biting when a pup is small can turn into a much larger problem when they grow up. You've got to spend the time and solve this issue once it shows up. Otherwise you're going to be in for some painful moments in the future...!

- John


[MOD: link removed]
 

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Jess is 8 weeks and has just had her first injections. We got her at just over 6 weeks which we knew was not ideal. Everthing is going great regarding toilet training etc. The onlly problem which we knew was going to happen is the biting. If its not the trees in the garden its your hands !!
I can say NO and naughty and she will leave me alone and go in a huff either behind me or lie on the floor, however my 12 year old son is in bits as he cant seem to get her to react the same. She even jusped yesterday and caught his lip making him bleed.
As I said I feel myself and my wife are certainly winning the battle however my young son Im not so sure feels he is.
Anyone any tips on lowering a 12 year olds voice :)
 

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bucker said:
THANK YOU FOR PUTTING THIS ON - I WAS BEGINNING TO THINK OUR 1 YEAR OLD BOY COOPER WAS JUST BEING BAD AS WE HAD ANOTHER LAB WHEN I WAS GROWING UP AND SHE NEVER BITE ONCE, WHERE AS COOPER WILL HAVE A NIBLE/BITE AS OFTEN AS POSSIBLE

THANKS AGAIN
I don't know if you will come back to see this, but this thread is about young puppies biting, which is perfectly normal. I don't know what you mean by a "nibble/bite" (people have different interpretations of quite what these are), but a behaviour that is normal and usually grown out of in a young puppy, may be undesirable in an older dog.
 

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Parsy said:
Jess is 8 weeks and has just had her first injections. We got her at just over 6 weeks which we knew was not ideal. Everthing is going great regarding toilet training etc. The onlly problem which we knew was going to happen is the biting. If its not the trees in the garden its your hands !!
I can say NO and naughty and she will leave me alone and go in a huff either behind me or lie on the floor, however my 12 year old son is in bits as he cant seem to get her to react the same. She even jusped yesterday and caught his lip making him bleed.
As I said I feel myself and my wife are certainly winning the battle however my young son Im not so sure feels he is.
Anyone any tips on lowering a 12 year olds voice :)
My son is a big eleven year old, my puppy is 13 weeks.

We have the same problem, Byron dives at my son. The problem is, the actions and reactions of my son make Byron think this is a game. So here's what is working for us. My son has to stand up quickly when Byron jumps at him, (this puts his face out of reach) and as soon as he is able, when Byron has all four legs on the floor, he grabs the back of the collar and holds him still. If my daughter or myself are there, we pick him up and put him on the other side of the lounge door, and close it. We just keep repeating it. If it goes on three or four times, he goes in his crate for a few minutes. We take him out and stroke his head and chin, saying "this is nice" over and over in a calm voice. It seems to be working. But he does it every day, and I have noticed it is in the evening before his last meal, and again when he is tired for bed, and over excited. If Byron is sitting next to one of us (we do allow him on the sofa) and starts to nip, we have a rope toy which we put between our chosen limb and his mouth, and he will gnaw at that.

It's hard work, boring and repetitive, but it does work. Good luck whatever way you decide to handle it. xx
 

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Busby is still doing it at 5 months old, and he doesn't show any sign of stopping, whats making it worse now it that he is teething aswell. A chew toy, rope toy or frozen carrot for him to chew on and eat work well. But we do also get to the stage where we have to put him in his crate to calm down when over excited and over bitey with either me of the OH.
But like Chrissie said, Busby does it more at certain times of day. Just before his last meal of the day (like his last burst of energy before he settles right down for the night), whilst settling down he mouths alot, but this has become softer which much less pressure.
 

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I know its a cliche but it does improve, you wont even notice it improve either.

Its not like suddenly the bites stop hurting, but over time he will just have your fingers in his/her's mouth and it wont hurt, it will be remember how that used to really hurt.

A big OW from us would excite George, so it was the NO and ignoring standing up turning back, any repeat would be a minute time out in his crate.
 

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...sigh..i feel so guilty..i slap my puppy "thor" ( a male yellow lab puppy) becoz he bite me..and ruin my office pants..so i punish him..putting him on our roof deck..i cant sleep,so i search for the net about labs biting,and found it is normal to a puppy..after i read this, i took thor out of the roof deck and put him beside my bed..i love my puppy so mch,,i thought i bought a vicious one and decided to sell him...but no more after i read your forum..thnk you very mch Jules!!!you help a lot..but now he still biting my bedsheet..i love thor..lol
 

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I just stand up and walk away from Tia, shouting at her, or nose tapping makes her believe it is a game and makes the behaviour worse. I have taught this technique to my nephews, who are 9 and 11 and they handle her very well! Of course I never let them play with her unsupervised, but they understand doggy behaviour better than I thought they would!
 

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Thankyou - Bite Inhibition

Just would like to thank all the forum members for this thread on biting

Finn (at 12 weeks) was always biting and we were worried, biting us, the children all the time, we were trying to stop it, all the time and putting him in his crate every time.

We were so wrong, after reading your thread we realised that he wasn't biting but mouthing, did more research, found this video. Now he mouths us very gently, even the children when he is calm and under supervision. Its going great, he is more relaxed, we are more relaxed, he now mouths much less, and hardly ever actually bites, all in a few days of new approach :)


So thanks for the advice, we are all much happier now :lol:
 

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i have two choc labs 10 months and they still bit when excited. If someone comes into the house they latch onto anything they can dresses/skirts/trs/cardigans/hands/feet. One of them always tries to bring you something and if he has something that's okay but if not tries to take your wrist and it's awfully sore. If you sit to play with them on the floor they just bite anywhere they can playfully of course but not good. Does anyone have any idea why they do it and also how to stop it. I am concerned for any children that come into the house.
 

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We also had this but not as bad I think,
puppy training classes has really help us to understand it and how to manage it.

We see the biting as just play or trying to get a reaction out of us and if he bites hard he gets a reaction for sure :)

So our trainer was great and she suggested that if you remove the thing that they like and they will stop it, so following the advice if finn bites (not mouths but bites) then we all stand up a leave the room for a few minutes.

It only took a few times for him to work out why his source of fun had just been removed leaving him all alone. If he is calm and playing without biting then we reward him with lots of praise.

There are times when he needs to bite, especially if teething, so when its these times we give him a toy to chew, this is hard work as every time he thinks about biting (you can tell with the way he acts) a toy appears in his mouth but its worth it. The good thing is so far he has never been tempted to chew anything else.

The technique of saying Ouch or squealing when bitten really didnt work for us at all.

With people visiting this is a completely different thing, again in puppy classes, we were taught to put him in a known state before they arrive or meeting strangers, so we put him in a sit position (from which its difficult to jump up from) or the down position. We try this on walks and with visitors, and it really works. He gets rewarded when he stays calm with people. You have to also explain to the other person that only give him attention if he is sitting or lying down, and stop if he stands. Finn soon got the message what he has to do to get the attention he craves.

Hope this is helpful, also a local puppy class is really rewarding, but not easy to find a good one.
 

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OK there is a lot of good advice in this thread for you already but here's a couple of points that might help with your two -

1. Have toys located by the door and give each dog one BEFORE you open the door, practice this lots of times with someone you know or even your own family and reward them with lots of praise and play when they greet the person by wagging with the toy - my dog may have taken this a bit far if hes really overexcited (now aged 2) and there are no toys in sight he gives our visitors my shoes!

2. Don't let them in until they calm down, move things about/get a baby gate so they can't get to your visitors straight away, let the visitors in let them sit down then let the dogs in to say hello, if necessary pop a soft harness/collar and lead on so if they get too boisterous then you can guide them out which is where they stay until they calm down then they can come in and try again. This will take practice don't expect instant results but it is worth it.

3. If they are biting at/jumping up a person then 'be a tree' fold your (or whoever it is) arms turn your back on the puppy and say NOTHING if they try to come around you and jump up simply turn away again and again and again until the dog calms down - the instant they get four feet/bottom on the floor big praise, that way you teach them jumping up gets you nowhere sitting down gets you attention. I teach the sit and then use it as 'please' so if the dog wants something he says 'please' by sitting that gets him his food/his toy/to say hello to our visitors or a dog and so on.

4. Give it time and keep practising - they are still young and they will get there in the end if you are consistent, insistent and persistent - just like they are!

5. Floor - don't sit on the floor or if you do everytime they come too close etc then stand up and turn your back as above, basically any behaviour you don't want means 'game over' and you stop playing.

6. The video from Dr Dunbar above is great - there is a whole series of Sirius Puppy Training clips you can watch.

7. For safety don't leave your dogs alone with kids, you should always monitor anyway but be more careful than usual for now to ensure they don't accidently grab a child, they are only playing but the parents of the child probably won't see it that way.

HTH
 

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puppy biting

We have a four month old lab, Ruby. She is growing into a big, beautiful, strong dog, but unfortunately she is a serious biter. We are a retired couple and at our age skin gets thin, so there is a lot of bleeding puncture wounds on hands, arms and ankles, as well as ripped clothes. Ruby is our second lab, we lost our precious Tess two years ago, aged 13.
We remember Tess as a delightful, lively pup, but Ruby is really testing us. We have tried all the remedies, squealing like puppies, startling her with a loud noise, ignoring her, leaving the room, but she just attacks us more fiercely, and my hands and arms are now covered in bandages. She also is a lead puller and goes frantic and over enthusiastic when we meet other people, especially dog walkers. We took her to puppy classes as soon as allowed after her jabs, but the trainer expelled us after three weeks because of her behaviour. We have now found another trainer.
Ruby has started losing her puppy teeth, and she is getting stronger and more boisterous. I need some advise, we had looked so much forward to Ruby accompanying us on our walks in the local countryside and to having a dog in the house again, but this is mayhem.
Please, can anyone help?
 

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A great post, that I am sure will bring alot of comfort to new owners wondering what they have taken on!! Our old lab Lucy is 13 now, and I admit to haven forgotten quite how bitey and boisterous lab pups can be. Dottie at 6mths has settled down in the biting department, but is still large as life in every other way :lol: :lol:
 

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Puppy biting...reply to Elin

Elin, I am sure some of the more experienced lab owners will support you after reading your plea for support. I am sorry you are having such a difficult time, but understand completely as I have had many a moment with my 6mth old pup Dotty where I have wondered how I am going to cope.

She was a terrible biter/mouther but has settled now..., the jumping up and pulling on lead are still two big problems for us though. I got to the point where I could not handle her on the lead, when I took her out with our little Jack russell as she was just too strong for me. She still pulls, but I think we are slowly getting there, after applying advice gleaned from this forum, and local dog owners. I hope you get the support you need, and things settle down for you soon
 
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