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As per the title really. Sherbet's biting/nipping had seemed to really settle down over the past couple of weeks (he's just coming up to 16 weeks now) but the past 2 days he's been absolutely awful - a right git, if I'm honest. Chewing us, ripping up the hallway carpet(!!!), biting heels and ankles, getting worked up and snappy etc. He was sick this morning (then ate it) but didn't throw up again. He also seems a bit dribbly, and he's not dribbled previously, so I'm assuming/hoping this is teething - does this sound about right? Got the various kongs etc at the ready...

Please just reassure me I've not accidentally created a monster :eek: (and that I was right to not be worried about sicking up his breakfast, as it was a one-off?)

Also, when he gets worked up I've been putting him in his crate to calm down (with mixed results mind you). Is this likely to create a negative association?

Sorry, lots of questions again!
 

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Teething normally starts from around 12 weeks old, so yes, at 16 weeks he's right in the middle of it. It's usually over and done with by 6 months. (The last teeth to normally drop are the canines, and they can hang on a bit.)

You often hear the story that the adult teeth push the milk teeth out, but this is not strictly accurate. At a point between 8 and 10 weeks old the roots of the milk teeth start to atrophy, until there is literally no root and nothing holding the tooth in place, and the tooth simply drops out or is dislodged while eating. Mean while the adult teeth have been growing ready to take the place of the milk teeth. (Aint nature clever!) Most of my dogs appear to not even notice the teeth falling out! (Except Chloe who brought me almost every one, which I still have!) But occasionally nature gets the timing slightly wrong and the adult teeth arrive slightly before the milk teeth are ready to drop, and thats when the puppy, (or child) gets pain. In cases like this, something hard, such as a frozen carrot to nor helps.

Often you will find the adult canine teeth arrive before the puppy canines have dropped. If you look at them the canines are so much longer than the other teeth, and because they are designed as tearing teeth, tearing meat apart to eat, they have to take high side loads so need longer roots. So it takes so much longer for the roots to atrophy. But by this time the head shape is changing, the muzzle is extending, so the new canines dont grow exactly where the puppy canines are, so it's no problem. The adult canines grow beside the puppy canines, which hang on until the roots are gone and the teeth drop out. So many people panic when they see both canines and vets put their worry to bed by removing the puppy canines, but honestly this is totally unnecessary, give them time and they WILL drop on their own.
 

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As per the title really. Sherbet's biting/nipping had seemed to really settle down over the past couple of weeks (he's just coming up to 16 weeks now) but the past 2 days he's been absolutely awful - a right git, if I'm honest. Chewing us, ripping up the hallway carpet(!!!), biting heels and ankles, getting worked up and snappy etc. He was sick this morning (then ate it) but didn't throw up again. He also seems a bit dribbly, and he's not dribbled previously, so I'm assuming/hoping this is teething - does this sound about right? Got the various kongs etc at the ready...

Please just reassure me I've not accidentally created a monster :eek: (and that I was right to not be worried about sicking up his breakfast, as it was a one-off?)

Also, when he gets worked up I've been putting him in his crate to calm down (with mixed results mind you). Is this likely to create a negative association?

Sorry, lots of questions again!
Hi, whenever I see a post about puppy biting I feel compelled to write a reply as our girl Jas at nearly 5 months has given us lots of experience in this and hasn't done with it yet!
No, I'm sure you haven't raised a monster and yes, use the crate ( we like to call it den ) it's better to have a few minutes space between you and pup than to end up irate and in a downward spiral with it , you'll have noticed I'm sure that 9 times out of ten when pup goes in the den he's asleep within minutes. As much as possible if biting starts and the den isn't appropriate, I try to change activities with Jas, a little training or some fresh air and most days she has something very chewy/hard to champ on that is edible, but I never leave her alone with a bone at this age. John mentioned carrots, and filled frozen kongs or even just an ice cube to chase and cool those gums is fun.
Recently though I've gone up a gear with my attitude towards the biting, Jas is getting older so I'm being firmer about the ' no biting ' and also jumping up, we feel now is the time to work a bit harder on her manners in general 😀
You also mentioned chewing the carpet and being a right little git......so funny.....I don't know if you've found this but if Jas needs to poo, her behaviour is awful just beforehand!!! So it's worth checking, so many times just before ' going ' she's been having a mad 5 minutes, then out in the garden - " Busy " the deed is done and she's instantly calmer!
The other day she pulled a throw off the sofa and was having a good chew on it, stopped, shook her head, licked her lips looked at me in that quizzical way labs have.....there on the floor was a tiny tooth, the first I've seen.
Anyway, keep up your good work with your little chap, we'll all get there won't we? Thank goodness for this forum x
 

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My first puppy was such a dream, she barely mouthed at all. As she was such a gentle and lovely girl, I went back to the same breeder and brought home her half sister, what could go wrong? Well I soon found out that other half of the genetics could make a huge difference, the breeder had warned me, it was like owning a cross between a Tasmanian devil and a whirlwind, my sitting room was her own personal wall of death during mad moments, and I looked like I self harmed. But she matured into the loveliest girl, very calm and sensible, and I had my first dabble at gundog training with her.
They do tend to get a bit giddy around toileting, particularly pooping, both before and after. My now nine year old bum tucks after pooping, she is a perpetual puppy.
I've not had an overly destructive one, they've chewed some things, I lost a beautiful leather coat as it got nibbled all around the bottom of the sleeves, but then I'd still rather have the dog in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks all, appreciate the insight and experience as ever!

Mrs H.A. - unfortunately he doesn't fall asleep in his crate in the day. :confused: He will just sit there and wait, occasionally whining, but mostly just waiting. Sometimes this is enough to calm him down and he settles when he's out, sometimes he just leaps straight back into biting and nipping. I don't know whether I should be leaving him in the crate until he does have a nap? He's absolutely fine overnight in it (sleeps 7-8hrs reliably) but yes, daytimes are a battle.

No evidence that the biting is linked to needing a poo, if anything he's worse first thing in the morning not long after he's had one. He takes himself off to the back door when he needs to go out and either dive-bombs the cat flap or paws at it to be let out.

I feel horrible for moaning about him because over the past couple of weeks he's really been absolutely smashing with going overnight, house training (in fact it's been weeks since we've had an accident), sit/stay/wait/come commands all going really well, he's starting to walk nicely on lead and is fantastic off lead. It's just this blasted biting that's come back - but 10 times worse - all of a sudden :cry: This too shall pass, this too shall pass...
 

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He’ll calm down...when he’s about 3 🤣🤣

The best thing I ever did with mine was down time in the crate, regularly every afternoon for an hour or so. They all know that crate time is relax time and happily go in there with a biscuit or chew and chill out. The kennels I use comment on how he’s so easy to deal with as he understands “box time” is time to chill and he makes no fuss.

It will get easier and one day you’ll just think where did that evil biting monster go to? 🤣🤣
 

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My lovely Baymax is now 5 months and is a very mouthy lad but he's learned bite control with us humans so just don't wear fancy Armani and Gucci when playing with him ;) but he doesn't hurt us anymore. His new grown up teeth are also less pointy so less painful. He still does happily chew at furniture and LOVES to steal and shred his young master's toys. I've never used a crate, was unable to, but he's quite good at responding to "stop it" when we want it. So I'm sure things will be just fine with your little piranha !!! Hang in there.
 
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