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Hi - I'm new to the forums (and to puppy ownership). I was brought up with dogs, but only ever adult rescues. My 19 weeks old lab, Murphy, was rescued locally and is really challenging! Our biggest problem is his jumping up. We've tried turning around and ignoring him and giving him a command such as sit, but when he gets the idea in his head there doesn't seem to be any getting through to him. When we turn around he jumps up and bites whatever he can reach (actually, he does that whichever way we face). Any attempts on our part to prevent him usually just end with our hands getting ripped to shreds! All of our clothes are ripped, and he's started doing it to friends and family too.
I'm aware he's hitting adolescence now, but we can't keep this up - I'm running out of clothes! Any advice would be very gratefully received.
Thanks,
Kate.
 

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Kate, this dog has found jumping up an affective way, naturally because it is pretty negative and ALWAYS creates a response from people one way or the other.

Reschooling such a behaviour is not easy. There is no simple two minute way to do this (and then make the behaviour stop rather than just stop it for THAT occasion) other than counter conditioning. Basically the dog needs to learn there is something which reaps him something more pleasant than jumping up.

Does he have a sit command? A reliable one? Trained in using treats and one where he knows he will be treated when his bum hits the floor? If not you are on a losing battle trying to cure him jumping up, so get working on teaching that first. Its essential.

The its not about only having something to use when he IS jumping up, you need to TRAIN him not to, and that means setting up the situation over and over under different circumstances.

have a pocket of treats. Creat a situation where he jumps up. Then SECOND his front feet leave the floor, put your hand up to a sit command, and say siiiiiit! If he reaches full height on you, physically shove him off with a knee and hands and the minute he is on the floor say 'sssiiit'. If he ignores, you have not yet taught sti reliably and well enough for the command to override his desire to jump up - so get working on that. Lots of REALLY nice treats and a very simple command. Coupled with a hand signal for sit. A flat palm facing the dog and held about boob height.

Set it up over and over again, the minute he goes to jump up, say 'ssiiiit' and treat immediately. Hold him there (so a stay command would be very helpful) praise him calmly....release him quietly and walk away. Repeat over and over and over until there comes a time, honestly, when you could beg him to jump up but his arse hits the deck.

You need to keep treats in the picture for a long time yet. You also need help from other people to set the dog up and them having treats ready for those sits AND knowing the rules of the game and using decent timing.

Wear old clothes to train to begin with ;-)

Ask if it seems unclear. Its not easy.... quick, and the alternative is throwing the dog to the ground and making it so unpleasant to jump up he will remember not to do that again. But that is a very unpleasant way compared to making the dog think of something positive for not jumping up. The physcial way of dealing with it also means WEVERYONE would have to do this to the dog.... and that would turn the dog into a nervous wreak. So train a sit. Train a stay. and set the dog up in the most pleasant way for days on end and under all sorts of circumstances. Set them up. Thats training ;-) Just waiting it to happen to deal with it doesn't get you anywhere.

Di
 

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Diana - once again you've said it all and very clearly too. We're at the 17 week stage and obviously Mitch has been sat on from the beginning as a potential Guide Dog. But they do like to push boundaries at that age, and if Murphy has never known any clear boundaries then you've got a slightly tougher job. BUT well worth it.

You really can't do the nice cuddles and petting until you've got this sorted so don't even try :roll: And EVERYone in the family has to do the same thing or you're stuffed. Just fell out with OH over a "good boy" when Mitch had in fact been a little toad but then smiled at the right (?) person 8O It took a full afternoon of me feeling I was being rotten to him before the penny seemed to drop and HURRAH he remembered it overnight so we could build on it and not start from #1 again!

And yet - Mitch is a very good pup and we're experienced dog handlers, so don't feel bad about it. You just need to persevere.

Good Luck :D
 

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Brilliant advice from Di!

One thing that I taught Luna to do to prevent her overwhelming guests or workmen when they enter the house is to lie on her bed. I started like Di says by teaching her what BED means and getting her to go and STAY there for varying lengths of time followed by fuss and praise and reward galore. If she strayed she simply got put back on. Then it was a case of telling someone they could come into the house in a moment when the doorbell rang - arrange Luna on the bed while visitor comes in and settles (returning Luna to her bed if she moved and instructing visitors to ignore her - not look at her at all). Eventually, when Luna is calm and has stayed for a good, reasonable length of time I give her lots of praise and let her greet guest (they have to keep ignoring her until she is calm and push her off if she attempts to jump).

I also find that if Luna has a toy in her mouth she doesn't generally jump up - she performs a wiggle-dance instead!

Good luck and stick with it, being consistent will get you there.
 

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Just want to say it does get better, Saska was exactly the same and my husband kept on saying he did not want a vicious dog, but she calmed down in the end, I kept on putting a toy in her mouth if she tried Jumping and biting, I am sure most of us went through this stage at one time or another. Good luck with the training
 

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Good advice above.

I find that if mine has a toy in her mouth she doesn't jump up. She still gets very excited but won't knock people over.
 
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