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Discussion Starter #1
Having just seen the lovely pictures of Andrew's labs clearing stock fence with wire strand over the top, it prompts me to ask your opinions on allowing your dogs to jump fences like this. My friend's dog had a nasty incident when picking up on monday when she got caught in wire and was hanging from her back leg upside down. It took two people to hold her weight and a long wait for someone to rescue them with wire cutters. Thank goodness they were with others at the time.

When I pick up I am often a long way from anyone. I do not allow my dogs to jump fences unless I put my coat on the top first. They do agilty, so are very capable of clearing the jumps, I am just too afraid of them slipping and catching themselves. My boys will always seek a hole that they can squeeze through, even if I am out of sight.

I have come unstuck at working tests because my boys won't jump unless I am close - but I think the safety aspect outweighs the lost marks.

What are your views?

Katy
 

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I dont like mine jumping fences with Barb wire along the top and so dont encourage it, but when out on boxing day picking up (which was a great day) shady couldnt believe her luck as we havn't been out for a couple years picking up due to moving and life being complicated, as I looked to watch were a bird fell and turned back Shady had cleared a fence picked and come back over again I wish I had my camera as it would have made a great picture. I encourage them to jump Gates and wooden rails but not wire. I guess it depends on the dog and the owner knowing his ability to whether or not the dog can clear it safely. :D
 

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We do 'play' jumps with Roo when out on walks (he doesn't work) and I send him for retrieves over obstacles. However, I don't send him over wire fences, only wooden rails and gates. I will send him over metal gates, brick walls and hedges etc, but nothing that he could get tangled up in.

I *think* Di's Deeds recently had an accident to his manhood jumping a dodgy set-up :?

KMH - that's a good idea to put your coat over the jump first - they have less chance of getting caught and can see the height better :D
 

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Mine have been taught to jump what ever is put in their way. Up here we have lots of barbed wire. I don't let them jump barbed wire unless there was no other option, and if I'm near them I would put my game bag, or boot over the wire and then get them to jump over. I dont see a problem with normal strand wire, but I guess you need to be sure of your dogs ability.


Ian
 

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As you've no doubt gathered, my dogs are taught to jump, on command.

Like Ian, we do have barbed wire fences, and again like Ian, I will if possible, help the dog over, but in some cases the dog has to go it alone.

My dogs have sustained all sorts of injuries whilst out working, but thus far, none have been related to jumping fences.

I do think this does have something to do with the type of dog that I work, they are lean, athletic, and kept very fit. Having said that, I would never give my command "over", if I was n't confident that they could clear the obstacle in front them.

Andrew
 

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One of the areas that working showbred dogs CAN certainly cause problems - and is one of the 'higher level drawbacks' I often talk about, is in jumping. Naturally the heavier more substantial frame can cause a dog to struggle, not always with the height of an obstruction, but if they pause and need to go from a standstill. YES the extra strength is there, but the extra weight, shorter leg and more bone can hinder hugely.

I have to say my heavier showbred dogs are not great jumpers and one good knock or fall can set their confidence back a long way so I do have to be cautious. It took most of the summer to get Deeds jumping again with confidence after his accident. And it was not just his stupidity that caused him to injure himself but simply his frame not allowing him to get himself out of trouble by doing some 'gymnastics' that some of the light framed working dogs could when they met it wrong as many did.

Anyway, Katy, a good thread just ran with some great photos and interesting opinions on jumping recently from many I will find the link and slot it below...


Di
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you all for your replies. I have only just logged on to check emails after 4 days of being a doting auntie and having so much fun I didn't even consider my computer once! So I will study all this tomorrow when I have more time and reply then. Many many thanks for all your replies though!

Katy

PS HOW do parents get anything done?!!! I have done nothing other than play with Hannah for her whole visit!! And it was great!!!!
 

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Thanks Di, interesting link. Didn't have time to read it all (if I am going to get out of the office tonight!) but got the gist.

In summary after reading all your comments I think if you want to trial you seem to have to be prepared for anything. With what was said in the link article, and my own experience in the past, working tests seem to have less scary jumping fences, and I have in the past said, "actually if you don't mind Mr Judge I would rather not put my dog over that sheep fence" Mr Judge was most understanding and gave me an easier retrieve for my young dog which I accepted very gratefully, not bothered in the slightest about the zero points - my dog acheived what he was asked and I was happy and very grateful to be allowed that opportunity (it was a puppy test).

Regarding picking up - you have all made some very worth thinking about points. However I will stick with the woosy approach of teaching my dogs to go through, under, or round if I am not right there.

Many thanks to you all!

Katy
 
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