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I'm sure it is John, in fact I know that many vets are still pushing annual vaccinations instead of going by the recommended 3 year protocol by the WSAVA. That said, I think people rely on vets more than they would a GP, for whatever reason they don't feel they can question anything a vet tells them. I used to be a bit like that, but am a lot more pushy these days :oops:
 

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I wish I could say I was shocked John, but I wasn't. I think this type of thing goes on in our vets all the time; for example you only have to look at what foods they are telling you to feed your dogs. Dolly is due for her 'Junior' health check....vet sent a letter informing me of this, which will cost £10.66...for what????

Ernie the cat has to go back for a check up just so the vet can check the ulcer on his eye has gone. After I enquired about cost I was told I need to speak to the vet on arrival????

I'd actually prefer to be treated by a vet than my doctor....but the costs....nearly always inflated.
 

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I'm always split on the subject of vets; I can understand that they have some pretty big overheads now with all the top spec equipment they need to buy (if they don't, their clients complain about it) and they've lost a huge chunk of their worming and flea treatment sales due to online deals so I'm sure it's not easy to be a vet!

On the other hand, there are some bad vets out there (just as you'd find bad tradesmen) and vet practices that would basically try and push it until you dig your heels in!

Perhaps us owners are partly to blame? the biggest problem the vets are dealing with at the moment is overweight pets (over 50% of cats and dogs are very overweight) so I find that whenever I've brought a dog along with a 'proper' problem, some vets seem to struggle as all they see day in and day out are weight related problems. Another problem is also that some vets don't seem to give you a straight answer and they seem to try various different (often very expensive) treatments maybe because some owners are clinging on to hope a bit too long?

Natasha
 

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I've thought this for a while. The problem is,if you go against what your vet advises it can void your insurance. The big question is "Do you trust your vet?"
I've taken to asking the vet to itemise everything on the bill and even explain the cost of the drugs used when they are cheaper on line.
 

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So far as the vaccination goes, I've started to use a different vets where they agree with vaccinating every 3rd year. I think that with so many pet owners having insurance there's a tendency for some vets to advise unnecessary treatment, simply because the insurance company will pay out.
 

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This was the reason I left our previous vet, walked in with a puppy in a lot of pain and a limp and the FIRST question was "is she insured".

We were not at all shocked by what we witnessed in your link, sadly.

Mandy
 

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Of course they do, they are businesses at the end of the day, they have overheads, and therefore they need to make money.

The old fashioned vet practices where there was hands on care is long gone, it all about ££££'s
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I can understand vets as a business and completely understand that they have to recover their outlay and make money. But that should be from correctly pricing of treatment, not from putting our dogs through procedures which they have no need to be submitted to. I look at some of the things vets are advocating for dogs on here and wonder why on earth are they pushing that??

Regards, John
 

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JohnW said:
I look at some of the things vets are advocating for dogs on here and wonder why on earth are they pushing that??
Because in general owners expect it! Joe public expect the same diagnostics and treatment as they get on the nhs - if owners didn't want it in the first place it wouldn't be available to be offered.
 

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I have access to the same expertise, a top veterinary school hospital (that'll do hip replacements on cats), specialists galore but no insurance required or expected. I can pay any big bill in installments, even euthanasia, with no quibble. IMHO insurance made vets greedy.
 

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I got asked today by a neighbour if Luna had had an MRI on her elbows... nope, just the arthroscopies... but then her elbows aren't insured and MRI is expensive and the MRI would likely have shown that arthroscopy could be helpful!?! I like to think I'm getting better and more confident and competent at making a vet really convince me what is necessary and what not... so ultimately I can take the responsibility for the stuff that I pay for and give/put my dogs through. I blame/credit you John!!!

We had a lovely common sense, very local, reasonably priced vet until they sold into a big practice :( I travel further to a vet I'm more comfortable paying now. Ones that do their own out of hours emergency care, have nurses and vet on site overnight (rather than leaving animals overnight in a non-occupied building!!! If my dogs need hospitalisation then they need 24hr care BETTER than having me watching their every breath 24hrs!!) and who recognise that I'll do what's necessary and needed for the care of my dogs not wasted stuff!

I love that Luna's specialist gave her a quick dental for me while she was coming around from her last GA! Bonus! :wink:
 

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elsarivka said:
I've thought this for a while. The problem is,if you go against what your vet advises it can void your insurance. The big question is "Do you trust your vet?"
I've taken to asking the vet to itemise everything on the bill and even explain the cost of the drugs used when they are cheaper on line.
Maybe it's because we have the farm, but our vet has always been good - they aren't cheap but they are fantastic and reliable. They will itemise everything and also put what it is, antibiotic, anti-inflammatory and so on. I suspect they have to, because with livestock you have to by law make a note of anything medicinal given to them, batch numbers, expiry dates and so on.

If I needed to whinge, why is it I can collect any sort of medicine, injection,whatever for the sheep and administer it myself, (within reason) yet for the dogs/cats/ferret, the vet needs to do it. Does not compute.
 

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why is it I can collect any sort of medicine, injection,whatever for the sheep and administer it myself, (within reason) yet for the dogs/cats/ferret, the vet needs to do it. Does not compute.
The law is a bit hazy about this, if in fact it is the law and not just BVA Guidelines. It was explained to me that we could inject subcutaneously but not intravenously or intramuscular. At the time when Katy was Diabetic I injected insulin into her daily. (Though I had to attend the surgery daily for a week to be supervised, but after that I was on my own.) I think where they have us over a barrel is that most stuff to inject is prescription only so we simply cannot get it here on mainland UK (Though i think the situation with vaccinations is different in Ireland.)

Regards, John
 
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