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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I really need some help to stop Rueben from pulling on the lead.

He managed to pull me completely off my feet this morning (right outside the school gates :oops: how embarassing!) I am now on the sofa nursing a swollen, bruised and bleeding knee and foot. :roll:

When we go on the school run, I always put him in his halti harness as he gets so excited when he sees the other dogs and all the children and I find him easier to control whilst wearing this. However, I wish I'd taken notice of all the posts on here that say a harness is not a solution to pulling as they eventually learn how to pull into the harness. They were all SO right!!

When we go on our country walks, he's only on the lead for 2 minutes tops and whilst he pulls like a train, I know its only for a couple of minutes then he's off lead.

I'd be SO grateful for any help. Am I using the harness wrong or do I need to work more on teaching him how to walk properly on just a collar and lead? There's a lady outside the school who has had labs all her life, she said she always used a slip lead with hers but I'm not sure how to use one of those either! :roll:

I want to enjoy walking him, not dread it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I'm having the same trouble with Roxie at the moment . I'm off to buy a slip knot lead today!!! I think the idea is that it tightens round their neck when they pull so they learn then not to pull. Will let you know if it works.
 

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Do you go to a dog training class at all? If not it will really help you.

Not only will it teach you how to lead train it will also help to steady your dog in situations it currently gets excited in.

Lead training can be one of the hardest things to crack, especially if you have a dog who is already pulling etc.

I think you really need to go right back to basics, as if Rueben was a puppy again and start with very short sessions as home. 5 mins at a time. Personally, I would use treats and walk around the garden with him by your side, rewarding ONLY when he is walking nicely at your side by holding the treat at nose height. He needs to understand that you are more interesting than everything else!

Find a good training class if you can.
 

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Roxie2009 said:
I'm having the same trouble with Roxie at the moment . I'm off to buy a slip knot lead today!!! I think the idea is that it tightens round their neck when they pull so they learn then not to pull. Will let you know if it works.
They are great if used correctly but you must be aware they are not an instant fix and you could end up with a dog that is still pulling but also getting strangled at the same time. ;)
 

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hope your feeling better soon, must have been embarrising and getting dragged.

missy has fits and stages, ive learnt that with an ordinary lead to just hold the lead which is attached to her collar, holding the other end of the lead, the lead in the middle to put that also round her neck, does that make sense.

as she tries to pull she has got the lead in her neck and finds it uncomfortable so doesnt pull

candy on the other hand is brilliant on the lead, she keeps looking at me, i give her a treat when she does that, she troats along with me always having a loose lead.she will walk at my speed to.

as you say i imagine a slip know coller will do the same, i only found this out a few months ago, it may not work but only an idea

hope your wounds soon recover

take care

all the best

gary
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I would love to take Rueben to training classes, I think he'd really benefit from it.

The problem is the local one has a waiting list of 3 months 8O and the only others I can find are over 20 miles away and only in the evenings. I don't drive and the buses stop at 7pm here so I'm kind of stuck!!

I will take your advice though and go back to basics in the garden. The funny thing is off lead he walks to heel beautifully! :roll:
 

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Charlie can certainly pull when the fancy takes him too. Usually he walks pretty nicely on the lead whilst we are on his patch, but if we are anywhere particularly exciting then I have to revert to a headcollar again until he settles down.

I am one who would not recommend a body harness for a dog as powerful as a labrador unless there is some reason why it cannot wear a collar. Think about working dogs that pull sledges. They wear body harnesses, and put all their strength into them.

I would suggest a headcollar, though I am not sure how old Rueben is. If he is over 6 months of age (I think) then he should be OK with one. I have used virtually all types of headcollar (halti, gentle leader, kumfi dogalter and gencon). My favourite is my gencon (see Vicky's thread on them), as it is the only one I have found that does not ride up into Charlie's eyes. I have the clip to collar version, because then even if he tries to back out of it ( :twisted: ), the integral lead remains attached to his regular collar and I still have hold of him. :D

Headcollars do not always stop pulling, but they do make it more manageable. You can use them as a tool to aid your heelwork training. We did.
 

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Poor you Anita.

I used a balancing lead for Skylar which worked a treat for me. I now only use the harness bit with her normal lead and she walks beautifully for me. My DH uses a slip lead on her which works well for him as he takes her to work with him. I could not get a long with the slip lead as I find there is a certain knack to it, which my DH has off to a fine art... :eek:

I too find that Sky walks well to heel off the lead, but daren't let her walk off lead on the main roads etc.


Good luck. :)
 

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_anita_ said:
I would love to take Rueben to training classes, I think he'd really benefit from it.

The problem is the local one has a waiting list of 3 months 8O and the only others I can find are over 20 miles away and only in the evenings. I don't drive and the buses stop at 7pm here so I'm kind of stuck!!

I will take your advice though and go back to basics in the garden. The funny thing is off lead he walks to heel beautifully! :roll:
Wow, 3 months!

I don't know if you can afford it but it might be worth contacing the local club and asking how much their one-to-one training lessons are. You would get so much from a personal lesson and you might only need one or two to equip you with enough knowledge to work on.

Good luck!
 

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By the way, where in Essex are you (its a big county, I know)?

I am in the Great Dunmow area, and there are a number of good classes round here run by the same instructor who does ours. If you are near enough I could try to find out more. :D
 

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he's only on the lead for 2 minutes tops and whilst he pulls like a train, I know its only for a couple of minutes then he's off lead.
Just wanted to add that by releasing him after 2 minutes of pulling you are effectively rewarding him for it, not only is he getting to where he wants to go faster but you are then giving him freedom.
Try to wait until he is walking nicely for at least a few minutes and then releash, or maybe even a nice sit stay but something you can reward with the unclipping other than his pulling :)

Bit of a pain about the classes, though it's nothing you can't teach at home. Start in the garden with an ordinary lead and collar. Set yourself up to succeed so maybe train after he's had an off leash loon to start with and preferably hungry so he will focus on you for praise and the odd titbit.
Work on a 'look' command helps too as dogs find it impossible to carry on pulling forward while looking up at you - I find this preferable to changing direction every 30 seconds. Only reward when he's in the correct position, don't worry if it's a bit stop and start to begin with you'll both get the hang of things.
Try to make his leash walking when you have time and patience and preferably nowhere special you need to be, so he might need to stay home for the school run for a while if you can? Don't worry if you only get halfway up your street in half an hour, it's not the distance that tires them it's the concentration :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
They are great if used correctly but you must be aware they are not an instant fix and you could end up with a dog that is still pulling but also getting strangled at the same time. ;)[/quote]


True!!! Also thought I'd get one as she's managing to pull lead and collar off over her head and I'm soooo worried she'll end up in the road!! Do you think their good for that? Sorry Anita for hijacking this :oops: :oops:
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I don't know if you can afford it but it might be worth contacing the local club and asking how much their one-to-one training lessons are. You would get so much from a personal lesson and you might only need one or two to equip you with enough knowledge to work on.
Thats a great idea! Have just looked into it and have found a lady not far from me who offers one to one sessions for £25 an hour. Might give that a go, on her website I also found she runs training classes very close to me. In the evenings again though so transport may be a problem :roll:

I am in the Great Dunmow area, and there are a number of good classes round here run by the same instructor who does ours. If you are near enough I could try to find out more.
I am about half an hour (by car) from Great Dunmow. Not sure how you'd get there by bus but will look into it. Problem is that most classes in the evening and in the winter months the buses stop at 7pm :roll:
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Basil said:
he's only on the lead for 2 minutes tops and whilst he pulls like a train, I know its only for a couple of minutes then he's off lead.
Just wanted to add that by releasing him after 2 minutes of pulling you are effectively rewarding him for it, not only is he getting to where he wants to go faster but you are then giving him freedom.
Try to wait until he is walking nicely for at least a few minutes and then releash, or maybe even a nice sit stay but something you can reward with the unclipping other than his pulling :)

Bit of a pain about the classes, though it's nothing you can't teach at home. Start in the garden with an ordinary lead and collar. Set yourself up to succeed so maybe train after he's had an off leash loon to start with and preferably hungry so he will focus on you for praise and the odd titbit.
Work on a 'look' command helps too as dogs find it impossible to carry on pulling forward while looking up at you - I find this preferable to changing direction every 30 seconds. Only reward when he's in the correct position, don't worry if it's a bit stop and start to begin with you'll both get the hang of things.
Try to make his leash walking when you have time and patience and preferably nowhere special you need to be, so he might need to stay home for the school run for a while if you can? Don't worry if you only get halfway up your street in half an hour, it's not the distance that tires them it's the concentration :)
I hadn't looked at it like that (the bit about me letting him off after pulling) :oops: :roll:

There's some great tips there though Sarah! I think you're right too about leaving him at home for the school run, its always such a mad rush, especially in the mornings! I can then come home and take him out just one to one and really work on this. My neighbours will probably think I'm mad if I only get half way up the lane, but then they all think I'm a bit of a loon already! :lol: :lol:

Sorry Anita for hijacking this :Embarassed: :Embarassed:
No worries! Feel free!!
 

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My puppy trainer suggested a canny collar as Ruby pulls to get to other dogs
and I'm only small. She was pulling my arm out of it's socket.
The collar fits really snuggly a bit higher, by the ears, than a regular collar. It also has a strap that goes over the nose but not into the eyes. You then lead them from the top of their head.

It was first designed for horses and they adapted it for dogs.

I searched the internet and on here and found this old thread

http://www.labradorforums.co.uk/ftopict-417.html
Mr. Canny is on page 4

I used it for the first time on Sunday. It was amazing.
Ruby tried to get it off her nose at first. I just walked a bit faster and she was great. My 10 year old daughter even got to walk her too!

It really is worth the money
 

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Roxie2009 said:
I'm having the same trouble with Roxie at the moment . I'm off to buy a slip knot lead today!!! I think the idea is that it tightens round their neck when they pull so they learn then not to pull. Will let you know if it works.
Please don't use one of these without being properly trained to do so. We tried all sorts with Indy and eventually she learned to stop pulling when a slip lead was used but Indy and I spent a day with two gundog trainers to allow us to do this. I'm worried you'll cause your dog harm if you buy one and just start using it :sad:
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Milford -Cubicle, Really, Only a number of people have suggested it. One of them being a trainer. To be honest I'm more worried about her coming out of the lead and collar than pulling as it was quite scary when they both came off. Any alternatives that you can suggest????
 

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I stop walking when Eddie pulls - it took him no time at all to realise it was bloomin' boring to keep having to stop and return to heel before we could continue. Now, when he does tend to wander in front a little, I just say his name in a 'warning' voice and he slinks backwards to my side again!! Granted, we are having to do it every few hundred yards but at least he's not actually pulling, pulling.
 

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Im having the same problem with Lucy as well and were plan to tack her to training class on a tuesday night i going to try to see if any on could take her there be cause i got the girl bridge on the night as well .
 

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Roxie2009 said:
Milford -Cubicle, Really, Only a number of people have suggested it. One of them being a trainer. To be honest I'm more worried about her coming out of the lead and collar than pulling as it was quite scary when they both came off. Any alternatives that you can suggest????
Luna managed to escape from a normal collar and lead a couple of times before I discovered the half-check collar. I found this one on a website as an example to show you, we have the one available at petsathome.

http://www.collarsandtags.co.uk/leather-half-check-collar-black-tan-p-441.html

The collar sits normally when the dog is walking on a loose lead but tightens so that it cannot go over head if the dog tries to back out. Luna panicked when having her injection today and despite backing up couldn't escape. I find now that the noise of the chain as it tightens can often remind her to walk next to me instead of pull so I've begun to give the lead and so the chain a shake if she is getting too far ahead.

Luna began her pulling on the lead during the icy weather and I found the halti headcollar was brilliant for giving me control over her whilst not giving her the power to pull me over; however, I only use/d this as a temporary solution as she has learnt to pull in it meaning her head and neck are strained as have other dogs I know.
 
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