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Oscar (8 months, been with us 2 weeks), squeaks at us, but if we don't respond instantly, he jumps up at me. When I tell him to get "off" he puts his mouth round my arm. There's no pressure, but it's behaviour that needs to change and soon. I'm not sure what to do... What signal to teach and how to do it. I am not sure "poochie bells" would work as he's likely to tug and tug till they come adrift and become a new toy. Our house is such that the way to the garden is through the utility room. There's a baby gate between kitchen and utility to prevent him snacking in the cat tray (eeeew!). So he passes through the utility room, never stays there. We don't leave him unattended in the garden, so there is no need for him to ask to come in. Ideas welcomed :)
 

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Amy gives me the hard stare, and if I then say, "Is it urgent?" she'll take a few steps towards the back door.

But you say "When I tell him to get "off" he puts his mouth round my arm. There's no pressure, but it's behaviour that needs to change and soon." Question, why does it need to change? Amy loves to take me for a walk! It's a Labrador thing, they love to hold things. There is no malice in it, no thought of inflicting pain or dominance, it's simply "Come with me!" If she starts to get a bit harder I just say "Hey, gently" and she eases off. My old Beth used to take my face in her mouth if she got the chance, it was her kiss! If you really want to stop it then a firm "No" and remove your arm from his mouth and give him a toy to hold.

Regards, John
 

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Mine look at me and look outside whilst standing or sitting at the back door. If I am not in the kitchen, so can't see them at the door, they will pace up and down looking at me and trying to get my attention. It is not something I have taught, just a learnt behaviour. If they urgently need to go out at night they will bark, a different type of bark to their usual.

With regards the mouthing I would firmly say 'NO' and turn away, removing any eye contact. He will soon learn that unwanted behaviour gets no reward.

Hope this helps.
Chloe
 
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Mine just stand and stare longingly at the door, then if they get desperate they come and stare at me, then run to the door in a sort of "Come quick, Timmy has fallen down the well" Lassie way, until I follow them. I never deliberately taught them this, but as all my dogs use the same technique, it must be something I inadvertently teach them.

My sis has a hand/arm holder, not a Lab but a huge Rottie x Pyrenean Mountain Dog. She is very gentle as she leads the way and we've never been unduly concerned about this behaviour, although it does raise the eyebrows of guests sometimes..lol.

At 8 months old and only been with you for 2 weeks, I'd be thankful he was SO insistent that you let him outside to go to the loo. I know plenty of others who'd just pee on the floor at that age, if the owner wasn't quick enough to open the door for them.

If you really want to break this habit, then when he approaches you and squeaks, ask him what he wants and go straight to the door with him, so he doesn't have to use more persistent methods to get you to move. Hopefully he'll eventually link "What d'you want boy?" with running straight to the door, instead of bouncing on you then.
 

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As said above, I think if your dog has their own way of letting you know it's time to go out then stick with that. I wasn't always switched on enough for this with Gemma, I could never tell if she was trying to tell me something or just pestering for attention and play.

Like you, I can't see our back door, so when she went to lay down there to be let out, I could miss it and left too long, she'd puddle on the mat. She would never bark or whine to tell me, she's not the vocal type at all which in every other way is a complete blessing. So I did actually go with the poochie bells. Sure it takes time. Gemma did think they were some kind of new chew toy to begin with, but once she'd investigated them thoroughly and got it out of her system, she got bored of that. I didn't try to teach her anything about them for the first couple of weeks, just left her to satisfy her curiosity. Then it took some time for her to learn their purpose. But we got there in the end :)
 

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Chewy sits by the back door but if I'm not in the kitchen I can't see her there, when she can't hold it much longer she does a sqeaky bark to alert me and I know that means "NOW MUM or your rug gets it!"
 

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I've got to say thank you for starting this thread - the replies from everyone have cheered me up enormously!

I've been feeling like a big fat failure for sometime now because I have not managed to teach Elsa to ask to go out - she just goes and lies down in the archway leading from the lounge to the back door, never makes a sound and if I didn't pick up on it immediately to begin with we would have an accident. It took me a while to twig that she was asking to go out, it was me that was missing all her signs.

And now I see that loads of other people have labs that don't ask either - its great! I've just gone with the flow with Elsa, she lies in the archway or heads in that direction I ask "do you want to go garden?" and if she does, her eyes light up and she heads off determinedly.
 

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:cheesygrin: Got to admit my lot drive me to despair sometimes:(, none of them actually make it clear, may get a whinge from Mischa at back door, but the other two never ask, they just fly out when I open door so never really sure about them.
Worse though is at night, I sometimes get a cold nose in my ear about 4/5 am, am never sure if its a good morning gesture or 'I need the toilet mum', so I do get up and let them out, I say them because they are like siamese triplets:rolleyes:, they do everything together:eek:.

I do love em though, so take the rough with the smooth so to speak:rolleyes:.

June
 

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Our old boy Barney would walk everywhere, inside and out, holding your hand gently in his mouth if he could. He just wanted the contact.

Poppy 'twangs' the door stop - one of those springy things you put on the skirting to stop the door handle hitting the wall - when she wants to go out. So far she has worn 3 out, they lose their 'twang' after a while. No one taught her, she just started doing it! If we don't hear her she will give a good old 'woof'.
 
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