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Hi my names is Debbie first time owner of labardor puppy who is 10 weeks old and 2 days,
Only had him for 3 days getting the grips of goingnout for wee but now and then has accidents if I am not fast on the ball.
Great at night in crate wakes up every 3 h for wee and number 2
But will not stay in crate through the day when I am around want to sleep next to me.
Apart from that started to click train him sit ,paw.
26669
 

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They are a fairly sociable breed, and mostly want to be with you, I've got two under my feet as I type.

Lots of good advice on the forum, with training, I only concentrate on recall, manners on lead/heelwork, and the sit/stop, those are the three basics you will need as building blocks for any other training. Recall is the one that goes out the window first, I can't remember how many times I've seen people say their puppy can do sit, down, paw, play dead, roll over, etc, but at six months of age when they are gaining in confidence the recall is straight out of the window, and again, I wish I had £1 for every time I see posts similar to 'my dog has 100% recall except when there's a squirrel/dog/rabbit/person etc'. Right from the start, never recall unless you think they will, as otherwise you're training them how long they can ignore you for, so build up distance over time. With heelwork it's easy to get into the habit of letting a small puppy pull you, but as they grow and become much stronger you wish you'd stuck at the training. The sit/stop is one that comes in useful when you're out and about, if your pup's going to jump up, ask for a sit instead. If they're running back to you and there's something in the way like a cyclist, you can ask for a sit/stop, as long as you put in the training while they're young, and again, build up distance over time.

Welcome to the forum
 

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Also work on useful stuff, touching and gently wiping/cleaning ears, touching feet, walking on different surfaces, grooming, looking in mouth/cleaning teeth, I did walking onto a slightly raised wooden platform and getting them to sit (only a couple of inches) to replicate getting on vets scales, politeness around food. Lots of little things you can do indoors.

enjoy, they don’t stay little for long.
 

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I have started to get him to sit and walking away making him stay doing well I will work on the recall will have to look that one up. I want him to be trained as good as possible and heel work don't want to through to much at him
 

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Start heelwork straight away. As with everything the secret is to make it fun. Keep lessons short because their attention span is very short. Have a read of this for heel training It's something I wrote a while ago.

Heel training seems to be the main stumbling block for most new puppy owners, yet there is no reason why it should be. But just looking on various dog forums there seems to be a common theme. HARNESSES! Everybody is looking for the holy grail in the latest harness, and are seduced by the silky language of the advertising agent who is paid to make their product seem the best thing since sliced bread. “Use my harness and your dog will never pull again!” and such things as “This harness is kind to your dog, unlike collars which are cruel and can cause untold damage!” What they never tell you is why your dog wont pull on their harness. So ask yourself? Question, Does your dog read the label and say, “Oh, this is a XYZ harness, we don’t pull these!” No of course they don’t. The reason why any harness works is because it inflicts pain somewhere on the dog so that it makes it painful to pull. The very thing they accused collars of doing! Think about this for a minute, THERE IS NO OTHER WAY THEY CAN WORK! But the main problem with seeking the holy grail of harnesses is that your training then lacks consistency. Every harness or collar works in a slightly different way, exerting pressure in a different place meaning there is no consistency in what you are doing. Dogs learn by repartition, but every time you change harnesses you are starting a new series of repartitions and your training starts from day one again. But you are not really training at all. All you are doing is using different things in the forlorn hope that you will bore your dog into submission and that he/she will eventually grow out of pulling. Then “Oh joy! This new harness really works! I’ll have to tell everybody about it!” No it didn’t. Your dog just grew tired of pulling! So, how do you actually TRAIN your dog heelwork?

First off, as in most things, there is more than one way to skin a cat. This is just my way.

Firstly, I never take a puppy for a walk. Every time we go out of the gate it’s training. But not too regimented, rather fun training. Think about this for a moment. You are going on the school run and take your pup with you, killing two birds with one stone. Kids to school and puppy walked! You are in a hurry as you always are at this time, trying to get the kids to school on time, and preferably with them not getting run over by a lorry on the way! You meet other mothers on the way and have a nice natter as you go. Once you have posted the kids in through the school gates you can relax and walk back home with the other mums. In all honesty pup did not get much of your attention for the whole of that time, you were too busy. Training the pup was the last thing on your mind! Yet your pup was learning. He was learning that there were exciting smells and sights just past the end of the lead, people to greet and to make a fuss of him, so he wanted to get there in a hurry. In other words, he was learning to pull you along!

Better to leave pup at home. A lesson learned by him that he cannot go everywhere you go! Take him out only when you can give him undivided attention. But I’m getting a bit in front of myself. Training starts the minute the pup arrives, well before it has had it’s vaccinations and able to go out.

The first part of training is to get the pup use to a collar, and this literally starts the day the pup arrives home. I always put the collar on immediately before feeding. That way the food takes the pup’s mind off the collar. I leave the collar on all the time unless pup is in her crate. (It has been known for collars to get caught up in the bars and strangle the pup, so don’t take chances!) I like the softest, lightest collar I can find.

My first actual heel training takes place off lead in the garden. Armed with a few treats I call the pup to my left side, waft the treat in front of his nose so that he is aware of it and with the command “Heel” walk forward 3 or 4 paces then stop, praise him and give him the treat, then give him my “End of training command.” In my case I use “OK” as the command. Basically it means “We’ve finished and you can do what you want now.” Talk to your pup while he’s walking at heel, tell him how wonderful he is, keep his attention on you.

After a few days of this, two or three times a day I’ll start using a lead. And for my first lead I use a piece of string! It’s lighter than any lead, which is ideal because I don’t want pup to really notice the “Lead.” We are starting to walk a little further now, so time to think about where to walk. Aim at 10 seconds of heelwork at first, keep it short and keep it fun. Walk pup on the left and If he tries to get in front turn in an anticlockwise direction across in front of him. If he lags behind turn clockwise away from him and encourage him up to heel. Never walk in a straight line for more than 5 paces, straight lines are boring! Squares, Triangles and circles are the order of the day. Add other exercises in to provide variation. Stays are so useful for when you need to clear something up on the floor, or even for taking photographs. Recalls are obviously useful. But don’t combine the exercises at this point. For example, if doing a sit stay then make sure you praise the sit stay before moving on to a recall. Make sure your pup KNOWS it’s finished it’s sit say!

There is a lot of talk about the relative merits of collars or harnesses. But in reality they only secure the dog from running off. Really they play very little part in the actual training. Because my pups are destine to be working gundogs I don’t want a collar on my dogs when working because of the risk of getting caught up and strangled. So I use a slip lead, so named because it is quick to slip on or off and does not need a collar! If you do your training right then you never have a tight lead so what you use is really unimportant.

So now the vaccinations have been given and your pup is able to go outside the gate. I slip my pup into my car and take her to the park where I can continue training along the route I’ve started. I don’t want to walk there because it’s too far to be able to keep my pup’s attention. Plenty of time for that when the habit of walking to heel is set. All the training in the park is the same as at home. Short pieces of work interspersed with games. Even sitting on a seat watching the world pass by is still training, it’s training patience! Work at your training and you will end up with a dog to be proud of. I don’t take my dogs for a walk. I go for a walk with my dogs, and thats a big difference.
 

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Baymax, b.Nov2020
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Not sure one of our more experienced friends has mentioned and this might be a personal choice but on top of all of the other good advice I also think it's important to train them to not protect their food aggressively. Not that mine has ever done so, he's just too busy barfing all down and then kindly asking for more :) but I want to be 100% that if someone gets near him while he's eating he'll never dream of growling/biting.
 

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Resources guarding! Think about this. The two most important things for ANY animal are food and procreation. Food keeps you alive and procreation means there will be a next generation to continue. They are both that important. It is bred into all animals to look after our food. With humans there has been wars fought over it! So you could imagine any dog looking after it's food.

It's often been said that you should take food away from your dog. But why? What are you hoping to prove? That you are bigger and stronger than your dog? That you are capable of bullying it? What exactly does it teach your dog? Somebody smaller comes along and the dog says, "He might be able to, but you are smaller and I can stop you taking my food!" DONT DO IT! You are setting your dog up for a confrontation! Remember, when your puppy first arrives he does no know you, does not know if you are trustworthy or not.

I'm very careful around food, I want my pups to trust me, to KNOW that I'm not going to steal it. I wont even walk across in front of my pups when feeding. I might sometimes only give my pup around three quarters of their food, keep some back to add to the bowl when they have nearly finished, so my hand is seen as a giver rather than a taker.
 

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Baymax, b.Nov2020
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Well, being a gourmet I've never stolen my dog's food ;)

More seriously, just like you I would never taunt or otherwise harass any dog, less so mine while they're eating.

I just get them used to me patting, caressing them while they eat so they know that I'm not threatening their food in any way.
They seem to enjoy the treatment and trust me and they do the same with all family members friends.

PS It's quite amusing to see that Baymax ALWAYS goes back to his bowl after finishing at least 2-3 times hoping some magic food appears :)
PPS Having done it thrice I also start to think procreation is somewhat overrated ;)
 
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