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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any suggestions on teaching my 4 month old lab to stop jumping into the glass sliding door?

I currently have 3 dogs: 14 yo Austrialian Shepherd, who until the "babies" arrived had always barked to go outside and to come back in. My "babies" are 4 month old yellow lab siblings Holly and Sugar. I have a bell hung at the back door, and Holly quickly learned to ring the bell to go outside and she'll bark to come back in. It actuallly took her a little while to ring first, wait for the door to open, then pee, but she has the idea now. Sugar just doesn't seem to be getting the idea, she''ld rather go along for the ride with Holly. Sugar jumps up into the door,( she reaches the top) and will do it over and over again. I'm worried she'll either hurt herself or break the door!

My vet suggested I get to the door first before she gets to jump into it, but that is not always a luxury I have. I will not open the door when she is jumping into it, but wait until she calms down, while shaking my head and saying "no jump". Then I'll open the door for her. Any other suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
 
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how about giving a treat when he does not jump as a reward and a treat when he gets it right. Have you though about putting MDF over the glass bottom section to protect the door. We have glass doors downstairs and we worried so put a piece of MDF over the bottom. Penny
 

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Hi KT
Personally, I never teach a dog to give me a signal, just learn the signals that they give. I currently have one that puts a paw on my knee, and one that sits and stares hard at me :D (it's almost like he's willing me to understand :D ).
Have you taught Holly to use the bell, and where is the bell placed. Is it possible that Sugar could be trying to copy Holly, but has not realised it's the bell she needs to jump up to. If that is the case, can you move the bell so that it is away from the door.
she''d rather go along for the ride with Holly
I don't know any breeders that allow littermates to go into the same home, because they do bond with each other more than the owner, thus making the training four times as difficult not just twice as difficult. :shock:
You may have to go back to the beginning and start from scratch.
I would not do what the vet suggested, you risk making it into a game for her (ie race to see who gets there first), and risk making the situation worse.
HTH :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Holly, Sugar and the bells...

The bells are hanging down from the handle, so they are well within 'nose' reach. It was a tip that I had picked up from the many training books I had read prior to getting my pups. Holly just seemed to get right into the game of it. Sugar just appears to be my slow learner. Most of the time its just me who gets them out on schedule (1st thing morning, after naps, playing, eating, before bed) and in a family of 6...
The breeder told me I could return either one or both, if it got to difficult and it has been! However, they are both good dogs, and still puppies, and I'm just not ready to throw in the towel I take heart that their individual training time goes well and they will carry some to most of it over to when they are together.
Now, if I can just get the door jumping under control. Sugar's funny because she'll go to the dining room window and paw at it to get my attention, I'll signal with a finger pointing to the sliding door in the next room, then meet her there to let her in. It's when I'm not right there for her to view, the door slamming is the worse...
 
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