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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
;-)

Not being of the pocket or mindset to be able to travel up for the 12th, I'd be so appreciative if you are gentle with us when you answer these quick questions - those definately in the know:

- Are the Grouse all 100% wild?......I realise its its moors after all? Or are there pens and poults like the rest of us with Phessies/Partridge? And if its a bought in poults business, when abouts are the poults bought in? April, March?

Di
 

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glorious 12th

I`ve been following this forum for a while and have enjoyed the discussions and topics discussed. When I saw the above post at first I thought it a joke. Grouse are a truly natural bird. The game keeping aspect is all focused on the management of the moor, burning heather ect, and vermin control. If the birds have a successful breeding season and the predators are under control the grouse are plentiful and the shooting season is successful. If the breeding season co-insides with wet weather the offspring can die with the cold damp weather combined with a parasite that infects them. Often, statistics show several good seasons followed by poor seasons.
The grouse are left alone, not caught up at the end of the shooting, providing breeding stock for the following year. The keepers hoping for clement weather during the hatching and subsequent weeks. Sometimes the weather can be good around the hatching time but then turn later. This also causes problems as the young grouse find it difficult to find shelter under the mother in the wet, as they are too large but small enough to be vulnerable.
 

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Thanks for posting that John

Nice to see that the GWCT concur with my views of the coming season on the moors I work on, expressed in this very section a few weeks ago!! :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Andrew
 

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Thanks Andrew, and thankyou Pontbeck. Around here we simply dont have the suitable land conditions for Grouse, so it's something my dogs have never picked. Like most working gundog people I like my dogs to pick as varied selection of game as possble, but have to be content with Pheasant, Duck (Mallard and Teal) Canada's, a few Red Legs and the odd Snipe. We never shoot more than about 1 Woodcock a year and I never seem to be in the right position for that. (Although Amy has retrieved them still warm.) Although we have plenty of Rabbit and Hare we also have a "No ground game" rule so these go unshot. (Unless I'm out for a wander with the keeper or shoot captain, in which case the will occasionally take one.

Regards, John
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you everyone, highly appreciate your input.

No pontbeck - no joke. Some of us have no grouse within 200 miles of us and so know little about them. Excuse my ignorance.

Di
 

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There’s a piece about the Grouse Moor on here ……

http://www.fieldsportschannel.tv/index2.html

Open the 12th August broadcast, it talks about the conservation aspects.

Also about half way through is a review of the CLA Game Fair and it shows the new remote launcher attachment from Turner Richards, that some of you may be interested in. There is also a piece about Deer Stalking, that shows a deer being shot, probably not to everyone’s taste, but I actually found that bit fascinating, with some of the techniques they use to get a shot.

John
 

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di working your dog on a grouse moor is like nothing you ill have seen before.
on the moors i go to in northumberland ,the moor totals some 18000 acres of managed ground for grouse rearing,4 full time keepers for sometimes less than six shooting days a year.
as mentioned earlier grouse are totally at the mercy of the weather conditions despite what the keepers do in managing there habitat.
as far as the dogs are concerned they usually divide into three groups
one picker up per butt with two to three dogs ,who have to be silent and able to sit steady for long periods up to an hour or more before the shooting starts,once it starts its fast and furious with the double guns ,the loaders having to earn there keep.pickers up have to mark and record shot and pricked birds on a marking disc and account for the birds at the end of the drive.its very hard work for the dogs as the heather can be very dusty and pollen laden if its dry or if its wet very poor scenting.
the dogs need to be very fit as the heather saps energy.
the next lot of pickers up the back line are way back behind from the butts and come forward picking birds that go way backmeeting up with us at the butts after the whole area has been covered.and finally a sweeping sqaud comes through after the drive for any that have ran on or been missed.
trying to explain the scale of the shoot is hard as the distances the beaters bring the birds in from is in miles not just pushing them out of a wood or game crop.often the beaters are just a speck on the skyline at the start ,thats why it takes so long to complete drives.
i will try and get some photoes over the next few days.
take a look at the post of paddy and bracken and see the size of just one drive
 
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