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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi we lost our beloved black lab 3 months ago aged 12 to neuropathy, mainly. We hopefully gave him a very good life and he gave us so much. He was a real character and everyone that knew him loved him.

Although we’ll never forget him, we think we’re getting to the point of having another dog and it can only be a lab.

Our dilemma is that although we’re healthy and fit and active, my husband is 75 and I’m coming up for 70, we wonder if it would it be fair on the dog as they could get up to 13/14 years and possibly outlive us. I mentioned this to a friend who is in his 50’s and was very attached to our dog and did some dog sitting for us and he said if anything happened to us he would take the dog, also my step daughter a dog lover, would take it -we’d make sure our dog knew these people well, so we’d have contingency plans in place.

This would be our 4th black lab and we know we could give a dog a good loving home and we’re lucky to live in a village surrounded by great dog walking places.

What do people think of this? We’d want to get a pup or maybe a young rescue dog but we are aware of possible issues with rescued dogs
 

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I can relate to this post. I was 72 when I got Chloe and she will be my last ever dog.

I was, I thought reasonably fit and well, but within a couple of weeks of her arriving I was diagnosed with Prostate cancer. I have to say, Chloe was so good for me, taking my mind off what was going on, and hopefully my treatment has sorted the cancer. But Chloe did miss out during those early days, with me spending more time in hospital than at home.

But you are in a different position to me, there is two of you where I am on my own. Only you know how fit and well you are. But providing you are reasonably fit and able bodied, then I'd so "Go for it!" Life does not stop when we get into advancing years, we just have to find easier ways of doing things. There is a lot to be said for growing old disgracefully.
 

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Hi we lost our beloved black lab 3 month ago aged 12 to neuropathy, mainly. We hopefully gave him a very good life and he gave us so much. . He was a real character and everyone that knew him loved him.

Although we’ll never forget him, we think we’re getting to the point of having another dog and it can only be a lab.

Our dilemma is that although we’re healthy and fit and active, my husband is 75 and I’m coming up for 70, so would it be fair on the dog as they could get up to 13/14 years and possibly outlive us. I mentioned this to a friend who is in his 50’s and was very attached to our dog and did some dog sitting for us and he said if anything happened to us he would take the dog, also my step daughter a dog lover, would take it -we’d make sure our dog knew these people well, so we’d have contingency plans in place.

This would be our 4th black lab and we know we could give a dog a good loving home and we’re lucky to live in a village surrounded by great dog walking places.

What do people think of this? We’d want to get a pup or maybe a young rescue dog but we are aware of possible issues with rescued dogs
I think it's great that you are considering another lab, after all you're experienced so lab pup quirks aren't going to phase you. Life is for living, all the best in whatever you decide. 😀
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you both of you that’s very true - and dogs and labs in particular are good for our mental health aren’t they? People make you feel old st 70 sometimes but my mum is 95 and we could live another 20 years or more.

John sorry to hear of your prostate cancer, I hope you’re on the mend
 

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I get yearly checks, and so far all fine, so the treatment has brought me another 6 years so far, which cant be bad! My mother was nearly 102 when she died, my father 91, so I'm not ready to stagnate just yet.

I pick up on a shoot during the winter and three of us assist our gamekeeper all through the summer. Officially I'm the (Unpaid!!) underkeeper. Of the three of us, Rod on the far side of the table is the youngest at 77, Ellis at the head of the table celebrated his 84th birthday last Saturday and I'm on the near side of the table (With the orange 2 way radio on my collar) am 78. I've no intention of growing old for a long time yet!

26751
 

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Why not start researching and see if you feel like another puppy (it's a minefield out there at the moment) or possibly taking on a youngster? There may be a few of those about following lockdown easing, with people buying pups they don't really have time for.

The other thing to consider is that a good breeder will stay in touch and offer a life time back up for that pup/dog, so if you're struggling in a few years time, even ten years down the road they should help out xx
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
That’s great, John, keep doing it.
Tarimmor yes thats good advice. We thought we’d wait til the covid madness has calmed down and that there’ll be lots of dogs up for rehoming - we can’t decide on a pup that you have from the beginning thats a clean slate or a re-homed young lab that you have to unpick bad habits and retrain them Whatever we get we’ll love
 

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Hi we lost our beloved black lab 3 months ago aged 12 to neuropathy, mainly. We hopefully gave him a very good life and he gave us so much. He was a real character and everyone that knew him loved him.

Although we’ll never forget him, we think we’re getting to the point of having another dog and it can only be a lab.

Our dilemma is that although we’re healthy and fit and active, my husband is 75 and I’m coming up for 70, we wonder if it would it be fair on the dog as they could get up to 13/14 years and possibly outlive us. I mentioned this to a friend who is in his 50’s and was very attached to our dog and did some dog sitting for us and he said if anything happened to us he would take the dog, also my step daughter a dog lover, would take it -we’d make sure our dog knew these people well, so we’d have contingency plans in place.

This would be our 4th black lab and we know we could give a dog a good loving home and we’re lucky to live in a village surrounded by great dog walking places.

What do people think of this? We’d want to get a pup or maybe a young rescue dog but we are aware of possible issues with rescued dogs
I think we cant live our lives on the What If's. You have contingency plans in place so if it were me, I'd go for it and have fun!
 

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I am almost age 65, put my 11 year old down 5 weeks ago and pondered same but the the void is so awful and my love for Labs so strong, I put a deposit on a litter last week. I say do it. Sure, first puppy year not gonna be easy with training but the love they give us for hopefully 14 years is worth it. Plus, they keep us outside, keep us young, keep us moving and social and nothing but good about having a Lab. My plan is to pick her up at 8 weeks, keep her at home to bond and love on her and socialize her etc until 5 months old, and then send her to a two month serious obedience board/train facility for some really good obedience training. All of the really good breeders recommend that. Keep them at home with you until they are 5 or 6 months old and then send them off for a couple months for professional obedience training, so that's my plan. With good solid breeders, with a deposit placed today, you won't get your pup until Fall or later so do it now if you want one. I suggest do it. We only live once and the love a Lab gives us is well worth any hassle. Do it. good luck.
 

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I am almost age 65, put my 11 year old down 5 weeks ago and pondered same but the the void is so awful and my love for Labs so strong, I put a deposit on a litter last week. I say do it. Sure, first puppy year not gonna be easy with training but the love they give us for hopefully 14 years is worth it. Plus, they keep us outside, keep us young, keep us moving and social and nothing but good about having a Lab. My plan is to pick her up at 8 weeks, keep her at home to bond and love on her and socialize her etc until 5 months old, and then send her to a two month serious obedience board/train facility for some really good obedience training. All of the really good breeders recommend that. Keep them at home with you until they are 5 or 6 months old and then send them off for a couple months for professional obedience training, so that's my plan. With good solid breeders, with a deposit placed today, you won't get your pup until Fall or later so do it now if you want one. I suggest do it. We only live once and the love a Lab gives us is well worth any hassle. Do it. good luck.
That might be so in the US, but I don't know any good breeder in the UK that would make that recommendation. Part of the bond I have with my dogs is in training them, both by myself and at training classes.
 

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The dog doesn’t need training but the owner needs the training 9 times out of 10. My sister used to live in Australia, they sent their dog away for training because they thought throwing money at it would do the trick (much like they did with their kids 🤣🤣), it made no difference because when the dog came home they just weren’t consistent with their commands and behaviour and the dog still ran riot. Huge waste of money. As John and Tarimoor have said, I don’t think any decent breeder would recommend it for pet type obedience.
 
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I can identify with this post.Bob and i are both old.We too thought about,whether we would die before Martha our black lab.We are fortunate we have a Son who has agreed to have Martha,if she outlives us.So glad that you have all replied to go for having another lab.They are the best of dogs.
 

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My 2 cents.
The simple fact you are asking these thoughtful questions suggests you'll be a beautiful owner for your Lab, so I would personally give it a go. Life is too full of surprises, good and bad, to believe you can plan and foresee everything. You would raise an happy dog which would be loved by anyone getting to know it.
 

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Two of the finest dog breeders/trainers in the US breed and train British Labs here in the states and do exactly as I posted 12 days ago. Pick up pup at 8 weeks, bring home to family to love and bond and learn surroundings and have fun. Work on basic 3 obedience commands and then for older folks like myself with some ailments and still working, send them to their "board and train" obedience training when pup is 6 months old for 6 weeks, and again, these are UK breeders/trainers, their programs work perfectly. I've seen it over and over and the dogs are lovely, well behaved, for life companions. Nothing negative. These dogs want to work and learn and that's what they do while away. British Labs as we know are not as hard driving as American Labs so are really sweet and soft and lovely temperaments so don't need much. They require exercise, obedience training, encouragement and love and you'll have a companion for life.
 

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A number of kennels in America have specialised in importing UK working Labradors. In fact Mike Stewart at the Wildrose kennel imported Baildonian Baron of Craighorn, the sire of my Anna. (I think Anna's litter was the last sired in the UK.) Robin Watson (Tibia) was in America for some years, though I believe he has now returned to the UK.
 

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Perfect example of what I’m talking about as Robin has trained in the US for years in North Carolina, recently moved back to UK I think but I believe will travel back and forth. Excellent dog trainer.
 

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I think the terminology is skewed, I have a very UK Labrador, and she is very, very driven. In fact I helped out at a working test last weekend and the trainers commented afterwards (we had a bit of an impromptu training session) that she was incredibly focussed on the retrieve. She is show (dual purpose) bred, so in your terminology, English. But then the terminology doesn't stack up, because our field trialling Labradors don't look anything like some of the 'American' Labradors. Someone somewhere needs to have a chat with the US guys and point out actually, our UK show Labradors are nowhere near as substantial as the US show Labradors, and our working Labradors aren't like the US style Labradors, huge misinterpretation across the board with the terminology.
 
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