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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there,

I was wondering what opinions are out there on electric fences. Where I live they are quite common. My husband had one for a dog he had before we married, and as I had never had an experience with them I agreed to try it. After all, I thought, it will give him freedom. It was one of the worst decisions I ever made. I know this is dumb, but I didn't understand that it hurt them, I thought it just warned them away from the border or something. I heard Bailey just shriek and come running to me trembling, he was terrified to go back outside. So I took the blasted thing off and put it on my hand cause I thought I should have sample what I expected him to go through. It was awful, I cannot imagine having that feeling on my neck.

I made my husband throw that horrid collar away. Am I being over sensitive? Or are those things truely inhumane? It seems to me that it is worth the effort to watch and train him to not leave the yard. I would really appreciate your thoughts. ~Jennifer
 

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wow first time i have heard of ppl using electric fences but i persume its mostly ppl that live near or on farmland??? sorry if im wrong..


i would definatly say they are dangerous(but thats my opinion) what do you mean throw the collar away??? did this trigger the shock? i thought as soon as anything touched the fence you would automatically get shocked??didnt know the dog had to wear a collar to trigger it sorry if im misunderstanding :eek:

i agree train him not to go from the yard or is there a safe way to tie him up with enough rope for him to roam then again he could tangle himself up..lol...so ignore that..lol..
i would just train him not to leave the yard really dont like the sound of the electric fence :shock:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi there,

Yes, the shock mechanism is on the collar...there is an electrical current under the ground that shocks through the collar when the dog crosses the border. So we threw away the collar part of it. Another name is "invisible fences". I think that name is just a way to make it sound nicer.

These are pretty popular here is Wisconsin, even in urban areas, which is why I didn't question it. I am all for dogs knowing their boundaries but shocking them just doesn't seem right to me. When we had it up he got shocked going after a toy. He was terrified of this toy afterward, I had to gently reintroduce t to him. It was so sad cause it was his favorite toy!
 

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I think this is a common problem with aversives like shock collars - they often have an unintended effect; whatever the dog is looking at when they are shocked is often taken to be the cause of the pain. Hence if someone uses an anti-bark collar and the dog happens to be looking at a child while barking and setting off the shock, the dog will often associate the pain with the child - you can imagine the problems that this can cause! I would always look for positive ways of training and steer well clear of punishment/pain training. Is there any way you can put a real fence up or is that not practical?

I am sceptical that these shock things are any use even in the hands of 'experts' and certainly shouldn't be on sale to the public. My opinion!

On a positive note, it's a good sign that Bailey came running to you for comfort - he obviously trusts you and sees you as protector.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My husband agreed to try another way. He wasn't quite as moved by as I was (I had a stomach ache the rest of the night), but did feel badly how Bailey was effected. I guess he got his other dog as an adult and the collar did not affect him as much.

We are looking into getting a fence (a real one!), but for now we are working hard to teach him our yard boundaries. It is a large yard, so he has plenty of space to run.

I agree, I don't think these should be used. It just doesn't seem right to use such fear and pain to teach.
 

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These "Invisible Fences" can have a number of problems. As an example. If a dog is running fast it is possible that the dog won't be able to stop when it feels the shock. The impetus carries the dog OUTSIDE the fence and is now prevented from returning! Another problem is that any other dog, not wearing the collar, is free to enter. The problems this can bring are rather obvious, particularly if you own a bitch and she is in season!!!

Sorry, I agree with you, there are better ways!

Regards, John
 

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sorry to go off on one but i personally think those dammed things should be banned. they are a quick fix for people who do not have the patience to do the job the proper way. sorry if ive offended any one but thats my opinion
 

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We use quite a bit of electric fencing for stock. It's the only way we can keep Foxes out! Occasionally a dog touches one, I dont like it but it's a fact of life in the countryside. My keeper said to me one day, "Just touch that fence and see if its working." I said, "What did your last assistant die of?" he said, "ELECTROCUTION!" Anna only once touched a fence. Now I only have to say "Keep Clear!" and she jumps back!

Regards, John
 

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i can see your point completely john and agree that in some situations like with stock they have to be used but these are the visible ones not the collar type which are the ones i object to.
 

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I agree with you completely Jane. Those fences can cause more problems than they cure. Imagine someone on the other side of the fence. The dog goes towards them and gets hurt. It is so easy for the dog to relate the shock to the person rather than the fence (Which he can't see anyway!) It could lead to aggression.

Regards, John
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you everyone, I feel varified that I am not being over sensitive. I have been working with Bailey for two days now and he knows not to cross the sidewalk. the test will be the next time he sees another dig across the street.

I am really glad we threw it away, I think Bailey just would have learned fear of the yard. I want his home to be safe to him!

It makes sense to use a visible fense for stock...but an invisible one seems sneaky and mean. Thanks! ~Jennifer
 
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