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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Jas has had a manky ear for just over a week now, wasn't scratching at it , in fact I discovered it by accident! We cleaned it gently with cool boiled water for a few days but it wasn't improving so a trip to vets was in order. Due to covid restrictions I wasn't allowed in with her but was told they had treated her ear with a foam ( apologies I can't for the life of me remember the name of it ) we were to leave it alone and return in a week when the treatment would be repeated. I asked about possible cause and was told by the locum vet that it could be mites therefore she must also have a catch all worming tablet as well.
We went back today after an uneventful week with the ear - same vet - she saw me give Jas a little bit of cheese as a reward and very excitedly told me that was the problem, no doubt in her mind, Jas must not have any dairy and that it would also make Jas have problems with her anal glands . Once again Jas was taken into the consulting room without me and on coming out I was told the ear was treated and the anal glands emptied and the stuff coming out of the anal glands looked exactly like cream cheese - this last said with a little note of triumph in the vets voice.
Now, I'm quite prepared to accept putting Jas on a dairy free diet, I know dogs can be intolerant to dairy, but I am very uncertain about all this, can this diagnosis be so definite?
I've read on here about a couple of tried and trusted remedies for keeping dogs ears clean and hopefully preventing another infection, how do members of this forum feel about those products?
One things for sure I'll be very glad when our regular vet is back.
Feedback appreciated
 

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Crikey, that's a magical diagnosis! Mine have bits of everything and I've never been told that they have ear problems because of a bit of cheese or dairy. One thing I have found is that it is definitely seasonal, so pollen, seeds, mucky weather can have an impact on their ears and eyes for that matter.

Are you sure it was a foam? There's a gel called Osinura which sounds similar in application, ie you put it in, leave it, and then repeat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Crikey, that's a magical diagnosis! Mine have bits of everything and I've never been told that they have ear problems because of a bit of cheese or dairy. One thing I have found is that it is definitely seasonal, so pollen, seeds, mucky weather can have an impact on their ears and eyes for that matter.

Are you sure it was a foam? There's a gel called Osinura which sounds similar in application, ie you put it in, leave it, and then repeat.
I think you are right about the gel, the name sounds right - thank you 😊
 

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You been stuffing the cheese up the wrong end??? 🤣 😁 🤣 Sorry, I dont like saying this but your vet it talking rubbish! The anal glands do not take stuff in, they actually produce the stuff. The anal glands produce a secretion, and are connected to the anus by a small tube. As the dog defecates, the stool passes along the anus causing it to expand. The expanded anus then presses on the anal glands squeezing them and causing a little of that secretion to travel along the tube into the anus and onto the stool, part of the scent marking process. Whatever you feed your dog makes not the slightest difference to what's produced in the anal gland. Either your vet was trying to baffle you with science, or was self isolating when this part of dogs systems was being taught!
 

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I think your vet is talking tosh.

We had a foam cleaner, I’ve just binned it as it was way out of date. You put it in, foam it up, leave then rinse out.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks all for the humour and support - very reassuring to know it wasn't just me that thought she was talking nonsense 😀
 

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You been stuffing the cheese up the wrong end??? 🤣 😁 🤣 Sorry, I dont like saying this but your vet it talking rubbish! The anal glands do not take stuff in, they actually produce the stuff. The anal glands produce a secretion, and are connected to the anus by a small tube. As the dog defecates, the stool passes along the anus causing it to expand. The expanded anus then presses on the anal glands squeezing them and causing a little of that secretion to travel along the tube into the anus and onto the stool, part of the scent marking process. Whatever you feed your dog makes not the slightest difference to what's produced in the anal gland. Either your vet was trying to baffle you with science, or was self isolating when this part of dogs systems was being taught!
Thanks John and no need to apologise, I was relieved that you thought she was talking rubbish as the 2 consultations we've had with her rang alarm bells on several levels, another example being:
Vet - have you noticed your dog limping?
Me - goodness , no......is there a problem?
Vet - when she stood on the table her feet are turning out.......and she is shifting the weight from side to side.........

Anyway the conclusion she reached was that on examination there is nothing about Jas's front legs to be concerning at present, but I'm not an experienced lab owner and the seed of doubt has been sown......

Footnote to the anal glands melarky, the vet said I should routinely book Jas in for a 3 monthly 'empty ' - is this necessary? My gut says no........many thanks again John
 

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None of mine have ever needed this doing, ie anal glands emptying. It's only a problem if the stools they're forming aren't firm enough to naturally empty the anal glands, and it's usually poor quality food that produces softer stools so as long as they're on a good quality food the anal glands should really be naturally expressed. Once you go down the road of having to have them done at the vets (some groomers do it as well) then I think it's a slippery slope, if it ain't broke, don't fix it sort of thing.

Raw fed dogs tend to produce hard poops, which may be one reason why none of mine have ever needed any interference of any kind, but I do switch them onto kibble sometimes, and it's never been a problem. The only problem I've ever had with kibble was recently, and one of mine became itchy and lost a couple of patches of fur, so I upped the variety to their 80/20 mix and she's been fine since, but she's the only one of my dogs to ever have a problem with commercial food, I raw feed usually just because I like to know what they're getting, not that I don't believe commercial foods are suitable.
 

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I've never, in almost 70 years in dogs needed to empty anal glands! Firm, or even firm'ish stools will do that for you. Even when mine have had gippy tummies for a week or more there has been no problem. The problems arise in the very few cases where the anal glands are misplaced, so stools passing by do not press on the glands, meaning they are not expressed naturally. Faulty plumbing can happen but it's very rare. So many people are being convinced that it's necessary when all they are doing is lining their vet's pocket with a nice little earner. Think dogs in the wild. (Or even foxes, they share the same plumbing.) They dont walk in the vets every three months!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
None of mine have ever needed this doing, ie anal glands emptying. It's only a problem if the stools they're forming aren't firm enough to naturally empty the anal glands, and it's usually poor quality food that produces softer stools so as long as they're on a good quality food the anal glands should really be naturally expressed. Once you go down the road of having to have them done at the vets (some groomers do it as well) then I think it's a slippery slope, if it ain't broke, don't fix it sort of thing.

Raw fed dogs tend to produce hard poops, which may be one reason why none of mine have ever needed any interference of any kind, but I do switch them onto kibble sometimes, and it's never been a problem. The only problem I've ever had with kibble was recently, and one of mine became itchy and lost a couple of patches of fur, so I upped the variety to their 80/20 mix and she's been fine since, but she's the only one of my dogs to ever have a problem with commercial food, I raw feed usually just because I like to know what they're getting, not that I don't believe commercial foods are suitable.
Thank you so much for this - I've never had my 2 older yorkies anal glands done and had hoped that Jas wouldn't need it either. She's on Burns with a small amount of home stuff occasionally, also has a raw meaty beef rib bone about 3 times a week. Her poos are firm is how, certainly formed and I've never seen her dragging her bottom along the ground or anything like it. I am going to start giving her some other raw stuff soon as there's a place quite near to us that does it........and the dogs certainly love it don't they - the pleasure she gets from the bones is very obvious 🙂
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I've never, in almost 70 years in dogs needed to empty anal glands! Firm, or even firm'ish stools will do that for you. Even when mine have had gippy tummies for a week or more there has been no problem. The problems arise in the very few cases where the anal glands are misplaced, so stools passing by do not press on the glands, meaning they are not expressed naturally. Faulty plumbing can happen but it's very rare. So many people are being convinced that it's necessary when all they are doing is lining their vet's pocket with a nice little earner. Think dogs in the wild. (Or even foxes, they share the same plumbing.) They dont walk in the vets every three months!
This is music to my ears John, and yes, it's certainly a good little earner for the vets and groomers isn't it, there was £20 added to the bill yesterday before vat!
As mentioned above, Jas's stools are firm to firmish, she eats a good mixed diet and drinks well, shame isn't it that vets occasionally want to make healthy dogs seem unwell and carry out unnecessary procedures.
After this discussion I won't be allowing any vet to do this, thank you for the information.
 

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No absolutely no to regular anal gland expressing! Beware if you ever use a groomer, some do it automatically.

I have had one dog whose anal glands needed attention. It was resolved by changing the diet but my vet showed me how to do it myself. You can do it in some dogs with external manipulation but I wasn’t that lucky. It is very easy to do, if a tad aromatic and you ideally need an assistant to hold the front end while you rummage and catch.
 
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