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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
HI,

I HAVE A PROBLEM WITH MY 12 WEEK OLD PUUPY, HOLLY, SHE IS GREAT IN HER CREATE UNTIL I GO OUT AND THEN SHE HOWLS AND HOWLS, WE HAVEN`T THE BEST OF NEIGHBOURS AND THEY ARE ALREADY COMPLAINING, I AM AT HOME MOST OF THE DAY AND ONLY POP OUT FOR THE ODD HOUR NOW AND AGAIN, I HAVE TRIED LOTS OF THINGS BUT SHE JUST WON`T STOP, PLEASE CAN ANYONE HELP? OR AM I JUST GOING TO HAVE TO WAIT UNTIL SHE GROWS OUT OF IT? :?
ANY ADVICE WOULD BE APPRECIATED, MANY THANKS


TRACE :wink:
 

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Hi

My understanding of this is it is going to take a bit of patience and training. A lot of animals have this problem and it can be solved with a bit of work.

Your neighbour needs to realise that you are working on training your puppy so this does not become an ongoing problem. You're being a responsible owner so don't get too frustrated!

I found some stuff online and this might help...

Don’t make your departures emotional and prolonged, but matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give him a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don’t reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to him in an excited, enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low key. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you’re home so he doesn’t associate crating with being left alone.


Keep arrivals and departures low-key. For example, when you arrive home, ignore your dog for the first few minutes, then calmly pet him.
Leave your dog with an article of clothing that smells like you, an old tee shirt that you’ve slept in recently, for example.
Establish a "safety cue"--a word or action that you use every time you leave that tells your dog you’ll be back. Dogs usually learn to associate certain cues with short absences by their owners. For example, when you take out the garbage, your dog knows you come right back and doesn't become anxious. Therefore, it’s helpful to associate a safety cue with your practice departures and short-duration absences.
Some examples of safety cues are: a playing radio; a playing television; a bone; or a toy (one that doesn’t have dangerous fillings and can’t be torn into pieces). Use your safety cue during practice sessions, but don’t present your dog with the safety cue when you leave for a period of time longer than he can tolerate or the value of the safety cue will be lost. Leaving a radio on to provide company for your dog isn’t particularly useful by itself, but a playing radio may work if you’ve used it consistently as a safety cue in your practice sessions. If your dog engages in destructive chewing as part of his separation distress, offering him a chewing item as a safety cue is a good idea. Very hard rubber toys that can be stuffed with treats and Nylabone-like products are good choices.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
THANKS

HI

MANY THANKS FOR YOUR KIND INFORMATIVE REPLY, I HAVE JUST STARTED PLAYING THE RADIO WHEN I GO OUT, JUST TO SEE IF IT HELPS, NOT AT THE MOMENT BUT I WILL CONTINUE AND I ALREADY GAVE HER MY T-SHIRT, WHICH SHE SLEEPS WITH, IT IS NICE TO KNOW I AM DOING SOMETHING RIGHT!

DON`T THINK MY NEIGHBOURS WILL EVER UNDERSTAND WHATEVER I SAY, I HAVE BEEN SLEEPING DOWNSTAIRS, SO I CAN HEAR HER ON A NIGHT, SO THAT THEY CAN`T COMPLAIN ABOUT THAT, WELL AT LEAST THEY HAVE LEFT MY CHILDREN ALONE FOR A FEW EEKS WITHOUT COMPLAINING!! :roll:

I WILL TAKE ON BOARD EVERYTHING YOU HAVE SAID AND WILL TRY IT OUT OVER THE NEXT FEW WEEKS AND LET YOU KNOW, ONCE AGAIN MANY THANKS

TRACE :D
 

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Good luck.

Just remember that for her behaviour - crying/ howling if your response is to rush and give attention of any kind you are enforcing that crying/ howling gets your attention and she gets what she wants.

I think as a puppy have set hours you get up to let her out for 'business' and she will learn you will come to her. As long as she is warm, has water, been fed, been business etc there should be no reason for you to run to her so just stick to your routine and ignore her when she howls and praise her when she is sitting quietly. It takes time and she is very young still so just be patient. Sounds like you're doing all the right things.
 
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