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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there, just DNA tested our bitch and although clear for CNM, EIC, HNPK, prcd PRA, she appears to be a carrier of SD2. A bit of research suggests that this is quite common in working dogs and doesn't have any effect on health, but that one has to be careful to mate her with a clear dog. She is actually from a previous litter that we had (and we still have her mum), but at the time of breeding her mum, DNA tests were not available and we just got lucky with the Sire who is clear - so mum must be the carrier.

My question is: Assuming that she was mated to a clear dog, would a potential litter of pups from her that are carriers be less desirable and thus harder for us to move on and we should simply stop the lineage or is this not much of an issue?

Your views welcome!

thanks,

R.
 

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Before the arrival of the DNA test for PRA there was a very well known working Labrador with a reputation for passing on his working genes. Towards the end of his stud career the DNA test arrived. Although he was never tested (to my knowledge. The KC were not recording results at that time) I dont think there was any doubt that he was DNA affected, (I never found a single clear dog sired by him.) the fact that the DNA test arrived when it did, combined by the fact that people used that test meant that we now have many great and clear working dogs with him in the pedigree. I am a great believer in using the DNA tests to clear lines rather than using them to eliminate lines. It is important that good dogs remain within the gene pool.

Sadly it is a fact that to many, a possible carrier is less desirable, though not everybody has that short sighted opinion. To me it is all about what a dog/bitch has to offer to the breed. A poor quality dog should not be bred from regardless of DNA tests, but a good quality carrier, mated to a clear is perfectly acceptable. My own Chloe was the result of an EIC carrier mated to a clear dog. Her breeder offered to DNA test some of the bitch pups for me to be able to choose a clear bitch pup, but I said no. I wanted my choice of pup, regardless of it's DNA status, happy in the knowledge that the worse it could be was a carrier. I still dont know if my Chloe is a carrier or not and I dont care! Were I to be wanting to breed from her I would test, but as I'm now too old to want the hassle, to me it's unimportant. I know she can never develop EIC and that is all that matters, and to me I have the best bitch in the litter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks John, much appreciated. Our Pip (daughter of perfect Polly) is a lovely, biddable dog and a her mum was a great gundog. Their pedigree is definitely a who's who of the FTCHs, so i would have no issues in believing that any pups would make great working dogs, which for my purposes is what I am personally looking for. There are of course the exceptions in any litter but hopefully the odds are in their favour. I won't be picking by DNA tests though but rather by character!
 

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I agree with John. I'm of the opinion that DNA testing should be used to include rather than exclude dogs from the gene pool. Mating a clear to a carrier ensures none of the puppies are affected and conditions can be bred out further down the line
 

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I'm another that thinks the DNA tests should not be used to exclude carriers, but rather to include them where appropriate. If we excluded all carriers then we'd be creating unnecessary bottle necks in the gene pool. One of the dogs I like for my bitch is a carrier for a couple of conditions, it certainly doesn't put me off using him, although I can see by the litters he's produced despite good results in the show ring, he hasn't been used much, and I suspect that's down to bitch owners wanting to use stud dogs with all clear results, which is sadly short sighted in my opinion.
 
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