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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Poor Stanley cut his front paw pad on Sunday. We are not 100% sure what on. We noticed he was licking it and it was bleeding. We’re away in North Yorkshire so not at home. We took him to the local vet who originally thought they’d have to give him a GA and stitch it but when they called us they said they hadn’t stitched it and had cleaned it out and put a bandage on under sedation.
We have only been taking him out on the lead for toilet visits and he has been really good about it. However this morning he got the bandage off. We rang the vet who said put another bandage on and a sock and plastic bag when outside. Easier said than done! We have had a look at it as best we can and it doesn’t seem to be bleeding anymore. There is still a flap of skin/pad loose. As we have tried to bandage and cover it for toilet trips Stanley isn’t very happy with us at all. He has slept most of the day under the kitchen table.
we are back to the vet in the morning and then I think we are going to head home as we can’t go out with him and he might be happier at home in familiar surroundings. The vet prescribed antibiotics and metacam. He has only had 1 dose of metacam last night.
He is really quiet which isn’t like him. I don’t know whether I should give him the metacam tonight as he didn’t seem to be in pain before the bandage came off. Since this morning he’s been a different dog but I think that’s more to do with us touching it and trying to bandage it rather than him being unwell.
I have read some of the posts on cut pads and it seems that it might take a while to heal.
Does anyone have any advice on trying to bandage a poorly paw? Or is it better to leave it to air dry?
At night he has been sleeping with the buster collar on, should we do the same tonight?
sorry for the long ramble. We are new pet parents and it’s so hard as they can’t tell you how they feel.
Thanks Lisa

just to add he ate his meals fine but hasn’t had a drink since this morning.
 

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Cut pads are quite common, so again I have a saved article on it which I wrote a while back:-

There is very little that can be done for cut pads. The pad is actually layers of hard skin, and thats the problem. Stitches tend to pull out faster than the vet can put them in so rarely successful. So the cut never closes. The pads are continually wearing just like the soles of shoes, but unlike shoes they never wear out because new layers of skin are continually forming on the inside of the pad. So effectively, as the outer layers of skin which forms the pad wears away it is replaced by the new skin which had formed on the inside. So although the cut never closes, it will slowly wear away, so appear to get shallower and shallower until it finally disappears. But don’t expect that to be any time soon, It will take several months before a deep cut finally disappears.

So what to do? Normally I give a couple of days before giving much exercise, to allow time for the edges of the cut to seal, so it does not start to bleed again. Longer if it's winter and there might be antifreeze on the path, or if the ground is wet. (Water tends to soften the pad so making it more likely to reopen, though a short walk is unlikely to cause problems.) I would also try to avoid running for a week or so for fear that the power going through the pad could open the cut again. Salt water is a good antiseptic and bathing a couple of times a day for a couple of days can only help. Personally I don’t cover pad cuts, except when he goes outside for a couple of days or so. A baby’s sock is useful. Put the paw in and tape around the leg with wide Micropore. It protects the pad and does not stop the air getting to it. Depending on the dog after around a week it's back to normal, though with a quiet calm dog, not prone to 100mph hoolies I'd probably relax after 3 days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Cut pads are quite common, so again I have a saved article on it which I wrote a while back:-

There is very little that can be done for cut pads. The pad is actually layers of hard skin, and thats the problem. Stitches tend to pull out faster than the vet can put them in so rarely successful. So the cut never closes. The pads are continually wearing just like the soles of shoes, but unlike shoes they never wear out because new layers of skin are continually forming on the inside of the pad. So effectively, as the outer layers of skin which forms the pad wears away it is replaced by the new skin which had formed on the inside. So although the cut never closes, it will slowly wear away, so appear to get shallower and shallower until it finally disappears. But don’t expect that to be any time soon, It will take several months before a deep cut finally disappears.

So what to do? Normally I give a couple of days before giving much exercise, to allow time for the edges of the cut to seal, so it does not start to bleed again. Longer if it's winter and there might be antifreeze on the path, or if the ground is wet. (Water tends to soften the pad so making it more likely to reopen, though a short walk is unlikely to cause problems.) I would also try to avoid running for a week or so for fear that the power going through the pad could open the cut again. Salt water is a good antiseptic and bathing a couple of times a day for a couple of days can only help. Personally I don’t cover pad cuts, except when he goes outside for a couple of days or so. A baby’s sock is useful. Put the paw in and tape around the leg with wide Micropore. It protects the pad and does not stop the air getting to it.
Thanks John that’s really helpful. He is coming around a little now and has let me put a sock on it to take him out (albeit unwillingly)
Lisa
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sorry to hear about poor Stanleys paw Lisa, hope it hasn't ruined your holiday.
Get well soon Stanley x
Thanks Ali,
It’s just one of those things, we are a little disappointed as we were really looking forward to taking him to the beach for a swim. He is sleeping loads so we’re happy that he isn’t too bothered by it. I always think we sleep ourselves better 😊. x
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi everyone
Can I please ask for your advice again?
We came home on Wednesday as it’s easier to look after Stanley here.
The cut on his pad isn’t flapping anymore but it is still open and you can see pink flesh. We have left it uncovered and bathed it in salt water in the evenings.
He is eating and drinking fine and has adapted to less active days well. He is quite happy to potter in the garden and then snooze on the sofa.
He has been prescribed antibiotics which he takes am and pm and metacam on an evening with his meal.
He started the meds on Monday and we watched for any signs of upset and he was fine.
Yesterday he had diarrhea before bedtime. He was clean in the night and a more solid toilet this morning. He’s since got diarrhea.
He seems happy enough and isn’t limping anymore.
I was going to stop the metacam now as I wasn’t sure if it was this that had upset his tummy. Does a reaction to this medicine usually show immediately or can it take a few days?
He is quieter than usual but that is a good thing as he needs to give himself time to heal.
Is there anything else I should be doing? We didn’t bath his paw last night. Should we do this daily?
Sorry for all the questions.
Thanks in advance for any advice you can share. Lisa
 

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Does a reaction to this medicine usually show immediately or can it take a few days?
Yes, a reaction "Can" arrive fast, or "Can" take quite a time.

But to me vets are too quick to prescribe pain killers. OK, there is a temptation to prescribe for two reasons, both to be seen to react to pain avoidance, (pandering to the owner??) and to make a profit out of supplying it. We all want to do our best for our dogs, but sometimes pain is a good thing. It deters the dog from doing too much. Much harm was done to footballers, giving pain killing injections before a match, to the extent that many footballers end their careers as virtual cripples. I try to avoid pain killers, both for myself and my dogs. Dont get me wrong, if it is essential then I will move heaven and earth for them. Towards the end of life again I think being pain free is more important than extending a life of pain. But in a case like this, no. But this is just me, the way I prefer. I'm not saying my way is right, just right for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes, a reaction "Can" arrive fast, or "Can" take quite a time.

But to me vets are too quick to prescribe pain killers. OK, there is a temptation to prescribe for two reasons, both to be seen to react to pain avoidance, (pandering to the owner??) and to make a profit out of supplying it. We all want to do our best for our dogs, but sometimes pain is a good thing. It deters the dog from doing too much. Much harm was done to footballers, giving pain killing injections before a match, to the extent that many footballers end their careers as virtual cripples. I try to avoid pain killers, both for myself and my dogs. Dont get me wrong, if it is essential then I will move heaven and earth for them. Towards the end of life again I think being pain free is more important than extending a life of pain. But in a case like this, no. But this is just me, the way I prefer. I'm not saying my way is right, just right
Yes, a reaction "Can" arrive fast, or "Can" take quite a time.

But to me vets are too quick to prescribe pain killers. OK, there is a temptation to prescribe for two reasons, both to be seen to react to pain avoidance, (pandering to the owner??) and to make a profit out of supplying it. We all want to do our best for our dogs, but sometimes pain is a good thing. It deters the dog from doing too much. Much harm was done to footballers, giving pain killing injections before a match, to the extent that many footballers end their careers as virtual cripples. I try to avoid pain killers, both for myself and my dogs. Dont get me wrong, if it is essential then I will move heaven and earth for them. Towards the end of life again I think being pain free is more important than extending a life of pain. But in a case like this, no. But this is just me, the way I prefer. I'm not saying my way is right, just right for me.
Thanks John, I will stop the metacam and hopefully his tummy will settle. I’m probably over thinking it all but it’s a new world for me I'm learning on the job 😉. Hopefully Stanley doesn’t want to trade me in just yet!
 
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