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I'm planning on crate training my puppy but have a couple of questions about it.

Having done lots of reading, I've decided to have him in our room at first, but when he's settled into his new home, move him downstairs. Would it be best to move him downstairs as quickly as possible (within a week), or wait until he's a bit older (12-14 weeks)? I've read conflicting advice on this - I definitely don't want him in the bedroom full-time though.

We have a secure utility room, which I am planning on using as his 'safe place' during the day and where he will eventually sleep at night (in his crate). Is there any need to shut him in his crate within this space during the day, or should I leave the door open?

Thanks you in anticipation of your advice. I have had puppies before but never crate trained and want to get it right. He won't be left alone during the day for more than 2 hours (and not at all before he's 14 weeks old).
 

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Having done lots of reading, I've decided to have him in our room at first, but when he's settled into his new home, move him downstairs. Would it be best to move him downstairs as quickly as possible (within a week), or wait until he's a bit older (12-14 weeks)? I've read conflicting advice on this - I definitely don't want him in the bedroom full-time though.
I've always started off with my pups crate down stairs, but a number of my friends do as you are thinking. If you do decide to have your pup up stairs with you to start with then there is a certain amount of playing it by ear. I would like to get pup out of the bedroom quite quickly before it becomes set in his/her mind, maybe moving the crate outside the bedroom door after a few days as a "halfway house" before finally moving it down stairs.


We have a secure utility room, which I am planning on using as his 'safe place' during the day and where he will eventually sleep at night (in his crate). Is there any need to shut him in his crate within this space during the day, or should I leave the door open?
This really depends on you and your lifestyle, how you live. If you are leaving the pup for any length of time, such as going to work, then how safe is the room, allowing for the fact that puppies can chew? I always shut the door if I'm leaving my pup. Before I started using a crate I twice lost my kitchen floor and had the door chewed, and that was only leaving my pup for an hour or so while I went shopping. Normally during the day I'm home, (being happily retired) so my pups and adult dogs are with me. When Chloe arrived I fell ill and had to attend hospital every day for treatment for best part of a year, which meant leaving her for around 4 hours a time, and there was no doubt the crate was a godsend. I could leave her happy in the knowledge that everything would be fine when I got home. I never de-crate until around a year old, because both times when I had a chewer the pup never really started chewing until 9 or 10 months old.

If leaving your pup you will also need to sort out toilet arrangements. Being shut in a crate will help that, (providing the crate is not too big) because a pup does not want to foul it's bed. But that means you MUST allow plenty of breaks outside, or he will be forced to foul his bed, AND have to lay in it! Obviously not fair to the dog.

Talking crate size, I use a 24 inch to start with for my bitches, moving to a 36 inch when the pup grows out of the 24 inch. Dogs are a little bigger than bitches so you might need a 30 inch and a 42 inch for them. You can use the large crate with a divider in initially but these days crates are so cheap on places like Ebay that it's really not a problem. For me, when the crates are no longer needed I put them up into the loft to await the next pup!

That should give you a few things to think about, but if you have any more questions, just ask.
 

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I've always started off with my pups crate down stairs, but a number of my friends do as you are thinking. If you do decide to have your pup up stairs with you to start with then there is a certain amount of playing it by ear. I would like to get pup out of the bedroom quite quickly before it becomes set in his/her mind, maybe moving the crate outside the bedroom door after a few days as a "halfway house" before finally moving it down stairs.




This really depends on you and your lifestyle, how you live. If you are leaving the pup for any length of time, such as going to work, then how safe is the room, allowing for the fact that puppies can chew? I always shut the door if I'm leaving my pup. Before I started using a crate I twice lost my kitchen floor and had the door chewed, and that was only leaving my pup for an hour or so while I went shopping. Normally during the day I'm home, (being happily retired) so my pups and adult dogs are with me. When Chloe arrived I fell ill and had to attend hospital every day for treatment for best part of a year, which meant leaving her for around 4 hours a time, and there was no doubt the crate was a godsend. I could leave her happy in the knowledge that everything would be fine when I got home. I never de-crate until around a year old, because both times when I had a chewer the pup never really started chewing until 9 or 10 months old.

If leaving your pup you will also need to sort out toilet arrangements. Being shut in a crate will help that, (providing the crate is not too big) because a pup does not want to foul it's bed. But that means you MUST allow plenty of breaks outside, or he will be forced to foul his bed, AND have to lay in it! Obviously not fair to the dog.

Talking crate size, I use a 24 inch to start with for my bitches, moving to a 36 inch when the pup grows out of the 24 inch. Dogs are a little bigger than bitches so you might need a 30 inch and a 42 inch for them. You can use the large crate with a divider in initially but these days crates are so cheap on places like Ebay that it's really not a problem. For me, when the crates are no longer needed I put them up into the loft to await the next pup!

That should give you a few things to think about, but if you have any more questions, just ask.
Thank you, that's really helpful.
 

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We brought our puppy home 2 weeks ago & just like you, I was in a real dilemma about this. In the end, we decided to just go for it & have her in her crate downstairs. She’s been great, she absolutely loves her crate & when she’s tired she sits by it & whimpers to go to bed! She just has her vet bedding & a seasoned blanket in there with her, nothing else. We have a blanket over the top but leave one side (the side a few inches against the wall) uncovered so there’s plenty of ventilation. We’ve been waking her at 4am for a toilet break & then up at 7am but last night we let her go through the night & she slept from 11pm until we got her up at 6:15am. My advice would be definitely have a seasoned blanket & to keep using the crate throughout the day for naps.
 

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We brought our puppy home 2 weeks ago & just like you, I was in a real dilemma about this. In the end, we decided to just go for it & have her in her crate downstairs. She’s been great, she absolutely loves her crate & when she’s tired she sits by it & whimpers to go to bed! She just has her vet bedding & a seasoned blanket in there with her, nothing else. We have a blanket over the top but leave one side (the side a few inches against the wall) uncovered so there’s plenty of ventilation. We’ve been waking her at 4am for a toilet break & then up at 7am but last night we let her go through the night & she slept from 11pm until we got her up at 6:15am. My advice would be definitely have a seasoned blanket & to keep using the crate throughout the day for naps.
Thank you. Fingers crossed mine will be the same! We bought the crate today and have vet bed which she's used to. She'll also have a blanket from the breeder (we were getting a male but now have chosen a female).
 
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