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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ripley has had red, gunky eyes for several weeks now & has seen the vet 3 times. She gave her an ointment (now on 4th lot) & has also put her on piriton as it may be an allergy thing. It is SO difficult getting the ointment into her eyes, she gets so distressed no matter how I go about it so the vet suggested putting a bit on to a cotton pad & rubbing it onto her eyes. I’ve been doing this twice a day for weeks & they are just not getting any better. 😢
I did some reading of old posts on here & a lot of people recommended using optrex infected eye drops, which I have now got for her. My question is, do I follow the instructions on the box i.e. 1 drop every 2 hours for first 48 hours then 4 hourly for remainder of the 5 days treatment? I have to say I’m nervous about using it but I don’t know what else to do. So far the vets bill is £250 & we’re not getting anywhere ☹
 

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To be honest, if you're not getting anywhere with your vet I would switch vets. If there is a serious underlying cause I wouldn't mess about with eyes. I do use either golden eye or optrex infected eye drops for mild conjunctivitis, but anything that lasts more than a couple of days and is no better then I'd want it sorting out properly rather than using mild treatments.
 

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She is 8 months old now I believe? Sorry but there are so many things it could be, several of them bad news. Glaucoma is not normal for Labradors, and also she is rather young for that, but for all that it's possible. Distichiasis is possible, I've seen it on a Golden Retriever. Trichiasis again is possible. These are all serious and MUST be treated!

Conjunctivitis can be home treated. To me the best medication would be Brolene which is available as drops or ointment, though personally I find the drops easier. It's a human eye drop and available from most chemists. (I've brought it in ASDA chemist.)

Yes an Allergy is possible, but really, to help with this you really need to find what she is allergic to. Treat the cause rather than the condition.

But eyes are serious things and I always tell people, if a home cure does not fix it VERY quickly, and I'm talking just 2 to 3 days, then really it needs a vet to eliminate the really serious things. Any of those things I listed at the top can in time result in blindness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for the replies. She’s now almost a year old so still young.
The vet has given her 4 tubes of Isathal drops, we’ve finished 3 & she’s about to start on her 4th tube. She’s been on piriton for the last 10 days & I honestly don’t think there has been much, if any, improvement, but the vet keeps giving her the same treatment.
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She’s not rubbing or scratching at her eyes at all & she seems happy in herself but they just look so red & swollen particularly when she’s tired. When she’s up & about playing etc, they’re not really that noticeable. Will try to attach photos
 

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The vet needs to be more proactive, if you are not happy with what they are doing then I personally would seek a second opinion, and express that you're unhappy with the service. It simply isn't fair to be leaving a dog with swollen and red eyes for that length of time.
 

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Ripley has had red, gunky eyes for several weeks now & has seen the vet 3 times. She gave her an ointment (now on 4th lot) & has also put her on piriton as it may be an allergy thing. It is SO difficult getting the ointment into her eyes, she gets so distressed no matter how I go about it so the vet suggested putting a bit on to a cotton pad & rubbing it onto her eyes. I’ve been doing this twice a day for weeks & they are just not getting any better. 😢
I did some reading of old posts on here & a lot of people recommended using optrex infected eye drops, which I have now got for her. My question is, do I follow the instructions on the box i.e. 1 drop every 2 hours for first 48 hours then 4 hourly for remainder of the 5 days treatment? I have to say I’m nervous about using it but I don’t know what else to do. So far the vets bill is £250 & we’re not getting anywhere ☹
 

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My dog frequently got infected eyes due to rubbing his eyes on the ground which in turn was a reaction to a head collar which I no longer use.

Yes you can follow the instructions for Optrex infected eye you can buy in a chemist, it contains chloramphenicol like the ointment from the vets. It comes as a thick lotion or liquid whichever is easiest. Providing it goes in the eye I doubt if it matters exactly how much goes in, but you can't just wipe the eye with it. Note: the chemist may ask who it's for!

Isathal contains fusidic acid which is also used for bacterial infections. However if it's not a bacterial infection, neither may be appropriate.

If it's an allergy it might come and go as the pollen the dog is allergic to gets released. At this time of year it's usually tree pollen and it's very bad this year due to the dry weather. It may help to get a pollen filter and place it near to where the dog usually sleeps or resides. Unfortunately anti-histamines don't work as well for dogs as humans, and the dosage is high for a Labrador sized dog (8 priton tablets a day for my dog).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
My dog frequently got infected eyes due to rubbing his eyes on the ground which in turn was a reaction to a head collar which I no longer use.

Yes you can follow the instructions for Optrex infected eye you can buy in a chemist, it contains chloramphenicol like the ointment from the vets. It comes as a thick lotion or liquid whichever is easiest. Providing it goes in the eye I doubt if it matters exactly how much goes in, but you can't just wipe the eye with it. Note: the chemist may ask who it's for!

Isathal contains fusidic acid which is also used for bacterial infections. However if it's not a bacterial infection, neither may be appropriate.

If it's an allergy it might come and go as the pollen the dog is allergic to gets released. At this time of year it's usually tree pollen and it's very bad this year due to the dry weather. It may help to get a pollen filter and place it near to where the dog usually sleeps or resides. Unfortunately anti-histamines don't work as well for dogs as humans, and the dosage is high for a Labrador sized dog (8 priton tablets a day for my dog).

Thank you do much for your reply. That’s really interesting you say that 🤔 We have also used a head collar on her which drastically improved her pulling but she really didn’t like it & would also rub her head on the ground. We stopped using it a few weeks ago & her eyes are definitely improving.
 

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Some head collars can pull up very close to the eye, and this can be very dangerous.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Some head collars can pull up very close to the eye, and this can be very dangerous.
She goes to a puppy class & the trainer recommended it, in fact, she is against all harnesses apart from this particular head collar. It was great in terms of stopping her from pulling but she wasn’t happy wearing it & I hated it being on her head. I’m so glad we stopped using it.
 

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I'm not happy with harnesses. There has been a lot of slick advertising there. Remember collars have been in use for hundreds of years, then somebody designs a harness and as part of their advertising campaign has weighed in saying collars damage your dog! What damages the dog is not training it to walk to heel. And on that front the big influencer is extending leads. Extending leads allow a dog to within reason go where it likes, rather that the owner saying "We are going this way." In other words, the dog is being given the choice of both direction and speed. It is literally taking the decision making and control away from the human and giving it to the dog. So is it any wonder that the dog does not walk to heel? It's being allowed to decide for it's self. Below is Chloe learning to walk to heel, and below that, her putting it into practise. I'm taking charge of the situation and she is walking with me, not me with her. Note the loose lead.

Chloe heel 1 - YouTube

Chloe Heel - YouTube
 

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She goes to a puppy class & the trainer recommended it, in fact, she is against all harnesses apart from this particular head collar. It was great in terms of stopping her from pulling but she wasn’t happy wearing it & I hated it being on her head. I’m so glad we stopped using it.
I'm really surprised a trainer recommended a head collar, particularly with a youngster, as most head collars going around the muzzle may well hurt as they are still developing and possibly finishing teething, there are only a couple of headcollars that don't tighten around the muzzle. All any head collar or harness will do is mask the problem, ie stop pulling at that point in time. It is an ongoing process, and even when you think you've got them walking nicely they prove you wrong in a different situation. Keep at the training, it does eventually fall into place and it's usually us that need training how to train our dogs.
 
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