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Beautiful, wishing you a long and happy life together.
 

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So cute ❤ What's his/her name?


Chel and Juice xx 🐾🐾
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thank you we are just trying to get here to stop crying at night but from what I see its a battle of wills and she will just
 

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What do you mean by 10 days and ready to go? My vet said we were ready to go immediately after the second jab. We’re already enrolled in puppy obedience classes and have been to two, been to one ringcraft class and taken a turn around the market. My puppy will be 12 weeks tomorrow. Don’t leave it any longer, you’ll be missing out on seriously valuable socialisation time.
 

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Vets all seem to have different ideas, some straight away after the second jab, some a week after and some two weeks after. For what it's worth I take mine out straight after the second injection. In fact, if I'm honest mine go out after the first jab. But I have private woodland and fields where I can take them so it's not quite the same thing because I know they wont be meeting any other dogs. :)
 

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We had to wait a week after 2nd injection before could take her for walks so was 12 weeks old. Mine is now 10 months old and is still massively timid. Went to puppy class and there was a black lab of the same age there. She was a complete extrovert. Still not sure whether we did anything wrong or if timidity is just her nature
 

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The vet told me the compony that manufactures the vaccine say 7 to 10 days I also understand that I could take her out its only a week so I will wait if anything happened to her I would not forgive myself thank you all for your input I also found out different componys who make vaccines have different time schedules so that maybe the confusions
 

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Vets all seem to have different ideas, some straight away after the second jab, some a week after and some two weeks after. For what it's worth I take mine out straight after the second injection. In fact, if I'm honest mine go out after the first jab. But I have private woodland and fields where I can take them so it's not quite the same thing because I know they wont be meeting any other dogs. :)
My vets also said I could have taken her to low dog traffic areas after the first jab. I didn’t because I have space and vaccinated dogs she could be with to get doggie socialisation. She was also fed by two different bitches (her mother didn’t have as good a supply as the other bitch who had gold top milk so was put in with the smaller litter for a few weeks) so possibly had double maternal antibodies too.
 

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Knowing that my pups are going to have to work around sheep and cattle, I always like to get them around them as soon as possible, so they grow up familiar with them. But also the farm know me so know I'd never allow my dogs to cause any damage to their livestock.

Also, I'm very old!! Had my first dog in 1955, before vaccinations were around. My friend said to me one day, "You are old, you must have seen loads of distemper, what are the signs?" I had to tell her that I'd only ever seen one case, a dog down the other end of the road when I was about 10 years old. Contrary to what people think, in those days Distemper was very rare and dogs were not dying on the streets.

Of course, all this was many years before the first cases of Parvo Virus, which started around 1973. At that time I was instructing at a dog club, and one of our members was one of the very first cases. She bred a litter of GSD's which contracted Parvo. The pups were taken to the vet college in Edinburgh, which at that time was the place doing the research on it. It was there that they found that the cat flu vaccine helped, but it was too late for Marion's pups, all but one died from the parvo, and the one who survived that was so brain damaged that the vets put it to sleep. Trouble was, being a completely new illness dogs had no natural immunity to it and at that time, to contract it really was a death sentence! We really did wonder if it could spell the end of dogs! But of course that was not the case. The next generation of dogs started to acquire a certain amount of natural immunity, and a vaccines were developed, and the risk was greatly reduced. But I'm now hearing that there is a new strain doing the rounds causing problems. But I'm sure the research labs will soon get a handle on that too.
 

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A bit of help please with feeding. she is on Purina beta. large breed I was going by the instructions but she still was hungry so I give her what she wants then take anything left away she has 4 means a day last one 90 mins before bed I would like you opinions ??
 

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Labradors are always hungry, thats their normal state! The geneticists have actually found the gene responsible! So it’s not really a matter of being hungry, it’s all about “Thinking” they are hungry. Have a read of the link below. It’s up to us to regulate their food for their sake.

We have to be continually assessing our dogs. Run your hands along their sides, what do you feel? If you can feel the ribs, hard edged then your dog is to thin. If it is only with difficulty that you can feel the ribs then she’s too fat. Ideally you should be able to feel the ribs, nicely covered. Think of it like this. Ribs covered by a sheet, too thin. Ribs covered by a blanket, ideal,. Ribs covered by a duvet, too fat.

The penalty of a Labrador being too fat, particularly when young, can be very serious. Joint problems, heart problems. There was a paper written a short while ago stating that on average an obese Labrador dies around 2 years younger than one of the correct size.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/09/10/chubby-labradors-genetically-hungry-say-scientists/
 

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A bit of help please with feeding. she is on Purina beta. large breed I was going by the instructions but she still was hungry so I give her what she wants then take anything left away she has 4 means a day last one 90 mins before bed I would like you opinions ??
If your pup is 12 weeks now you should consider only feeding 3 times a day now. So you can get it down to twice a day at 6 months. Don’t go to twice before 6 months though
 

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Hi all thanks for the input I called purina today they say a puppy 13 weeks 13kg on beta large breed should be on 220 grams a day split into 3 or 4 meals based on a dog heading to 25/30 kilo increasing as needed up to 375 grams for a 5 month old, but this is just a guide but as one of the replies check the ribs looks a good way to check. many thanks.PS whats your thoughts on puppy schools
 

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Many work bred dogs are quite sensitive. These are often the easiest to train. Show bred dogs on the other hand would really not be a lot of use in the show ring if timid. They would not show themselves well.
 

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I’ve took my Ruby to 2 puppy classes, a beginner then a slightly more advanced for 6 months and older and she is now 10 months and she is still as timid as anything. These are just the basics sit, stay, heel, and off lead training and leave training. She is brilliant at the training, hates the play time. Still tries to hide under chairs, I’m going for a 3 class with her starting in July.
 
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