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Our 5-yo Lab Harvey appears to be suffering from CECS. We're in the U.S. but picked him up in Europe while stationed in Germany. It's considered more of a Terrier-specific problem than a Lab problem over here. But yeah, looks more like CECS than standard canine epilepsy to us. He's fully alert and oriented throughout his episodes, which can last up to a half-hour in total and 'visually' he looks like the dogs in a number of the YouTube CECS videos. He is obviously distressed throughout his experience.

He had his latest episode about an hour ago, and he's running around acting like a knucklehead again now.

We are hoping for some specific dietary recommendations for him, hopefully a specific brand of dog food. He's been on Iams for all of his life, aside from the occasional 'off brand' bag during tight months.

You've got a great site her and we miss Europe. London might just be the best city in the world.

 

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That sounds dreadful and very distressing for both dog and owner. Having looked up CECS (Spikes disease) people seem to be suggesting a low protein, grain free food to reduce attacks.

I hope you manage to reduce episodes, it can't be nice for any of you to experience.
 

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Hi there,

Several of us have dogs who exhibit 'Atypical Collapse in Labradors' (which is similar.) My George has had a few episodes (typically from being asleep to awake quickly) That said, his episodes only last from two to five minutes. After that he is right as rain.

You may want to have a look at this thread and there are links to studies being done at the University of Minnesota

http://www.labradorforums.co.uk/ftopict-75222.html
 

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Hello Max_Hoffa,

Sorry to hear you are having problems. I see Tim has drawn your attention to that earlier post. Things move along slowly, and as yet I've heard no more than we discussed in that post. I cant help thinking that as CECS is seem as mainly a Border Terrier problem and although BT's are one of the numerically largest of the terrier breeds, it is still a relatively small breed in the greater scheme of things, (6500 registered in the UK last year against 45000 Labradors) that the big laboratories dont see it as a big enough earner for them to devote large sums of money towards developing a DNA test for. So I've a feeling we are not going to see a test any time soon.

Diet has proved a help in dome documented cases, but in others it seems to have made no difference. My own personal feeling is that possibly additives and colourants probably have more effect that what the food is composed of.

Regards, John
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the link to the other thread . . . much appreciated. I'll keep my questions over in that thread from now on.

re: low protein . . . I've read people's experiences with the low protein diets have been pretty hit and miss, seeing a bit more hope in the gluten-free diets right now. Leaning towards making the switch to a gluten-free diet over the weekend and give that a few months.

Yeah, it's hard to see Harvey deal with these episodes. But he's quick to recover and seems good as ever afterwards. It's actually a bit of a relief to find out about this . . . we were worried about far worse.

Artificial colors and additives? Thanks for the tip.
 

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Don't know if you've seen video clips of Monty?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MdifQO2qevg

He was diagnosed as having paroxysmal dyskinesia. CECS is thought to be a form of paroxysmal dyskinesia. He's now nine years old and has been having these episode since the age of two. He remains fully conscious and responsive throughout an episode. An average episode for Monty is around ten minutes - after which he immediately reverts to normal and runs around as if nothing had happened. He occasionally has shorter episodes but has also had a few very severe prolonged episode which have lasted almost two hours. The longest he's gone between episodes is fourteen weeks - but around once a month is his average.

I have tried many dietary changes without any success. If I can be of any help please let me know.
 

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That looks a lot like what Harvey goes through, especially the way the hind quarters appear more involved than the front. Harvey's episodes tend to be a bit more severe though. But yes, same awareness, same trembling, same sign of distress, same wobbly attempt to walk.

Normally it looks like Harvey's right hind leg is the most affected. Not sure if it is or whether he just tends to lay on his left side more often so it's more noticeable.

I see you try to get Monty to move while this is happening, using treats even. Why is that, can I ask? I normally try to keep Harvey as still as possible.

This clip looks like a 'typical' event for Harvey (it's not him though, Harvey is much more handsome).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXJfMrBII9U

His normally last at least 10 to 15 minutes. Yesterday's fit was over a half hour, and looked like two fits back to back honestly. It was his longest ever and the one that kick started me into researching his trembling.

I would love to talk with you about different diet's you've tried and maybe some tips (like trying to making him move?) to help him during events. But I'm just about out of posts here. I've used 4 of my 5 now.
 

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Max_Hoffa said:
I see you try to get Monty to move while this is happening, using treats even. Why is that, can I ask? I normally try to keep Harvey as still as possible.
You are absolutely correct in trying to keep Harvey as still as possible. When I filmed those clips of Monty's episodes around the time of his diagnosis, I did so specifically to show neurologists not only what a typical episode is like, but also do demonstrate Monty's ability to respond during an episode and to show what would happen if I allowed him to move around. I usually mention this fact when directing people to the clips on YouTube. I have found that it is essential to keep him lying down as much as possible as allowing him to repeatedly try to struggle to his feet usually makes the episode last longer and become more severe.

I'm happy to talk further with you - you can either subscribe to LF (as you are allowed only 5 free posts) or you can contact me via email
 

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One of my dogs has what I suspect is CECS. Will had his first 'episode' almost 3 years ago at just over a year old. Despite numerous investigations I was never able to get to the bottom of the problem. His episodes are very much excitement induced, although the circumstances that triggers one on one occasion won't necessarily trigger one at another time. I sit on the floor with him when it's happening and try to keep him as calm as possible. Fortunately they've only ever happened at home and never when we're out and about.
 
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