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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For the past month our 9 month puppy has become very sensitive to noise. If she hears a noise, it could be a book dropping or a noise outside she becomes very protective, she barks and growls and rushes to the door. We don’t want to totally discourage this as it is helpful for security purposes. Is this as a result of immaturity. Any advice, training trips would be appreciated.
 

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Just quietly work through it. At 9 months old she is now in "The Second Fear Stage" This is a recognised part of development of a puppy. This is a piece written by the American Kennel Club which offers good advice. Puppy Fear Periods: Why Is My Puppy Suddenly Afraid? – American Kennel Club (akc.org)

But one other possibility, has she been in season yet? Seasons can make a bitch a bit flaky. With my Chloe it was the ghost under the washing machine. She refused point blank to eat there until well after her season finished! (Nowt so strange as women!)
 

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Thanks for the advice, she has been neutered. I was worried about rewarding her resulting in her thinking she got a treat every time she reacted to a noise, it’s up to me to work that out! Article you mentioned was very helpful.
 

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Oh dear. Treats again. I have this very moment written a post about treating on a different forum! In that particular case the person was concerned about her dog not responding to her calling him when playing with another dog. She said, "I call him and when he comes I make him sit and I give him a treat." So my question, what does the dog think he is getting the treat for, the play, the recall or the sit? With the dog it's likely to be the sit, the last thing he did. The recall never earned him anything!!!

Imagine this scenario. Your dog sees another dog. You tell it to leave, but it goes anyway. You think, there is no point in calling him because he is not going to come back until he has finished his play, so you stand there twiddling your thumbs until he's finished then you call him back and when he comes you give him a treat for coming. But what does your dog think. "I just had a lovely play, then when I got back mum gave me a lovely treat! Isn't life good!!" He has ignored the command to leave, no bolt of lightening has descended from the sky and smite him down. So, "Obviously that sound "Leave" which I heard obviously means nothing. I can ignore it with impunity."

Treats are so useful for shaping behaviour, but dogs rarely see the treat as meaning the same thing as the owner intended. Timing is all important. Reward the action, instantly! Dont add something else in or you wont be rewarding what you think you are.

In the instant we are talking about here I would not treat. I would not want my pup thinking that barking brings a reward. My usual way, supposing I dropped something and my pup started barking, I would just use a happy voice, pick it up any without fuss, show it to her saying, "It's OK love, nothing to worry about!" The happy chappy approach is the way to go.
 
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